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Sung Kang Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Trivia (2) | Personal Quotes (14)

Overview (2)

Born in Gainesville, Georgia, USA
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Sung Kang was born on April 8, 1972 in Gainesville, Georgia, USA. He is an actor, known for Furious 6 (2013), The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006) and Bullet to the Head (2012).

Trivia (2)

Has played the same character, "Han", in five movies directed by Justin Lin: Better Luck Tomorrow (2002), The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006), Fast & Furious (2009), Fast Five (2011), and Furious 6 (2013).
Korean American actor. He also owned a restaurant named Saketini in Brentwood, California.

Personal Quotes (14)

My belief system is that you laugh at racism, and that's how it goes away.
When I started acting, I hoped I could make some kind of positive contribution to this world. When I get a letter from some kid in Nebraska saying that, prior to Han, nobody wanted to be his friend because Asians weren't cool if they weren't into martial arts - Now he's accepted and recognized as a human being. That's pretty awesome, right?
Sometimes idealism and all that make believe makes the world a better place.
Pre-'Tokyo Drift,' I was like: 'Am I gonna play Yakuza #1 and Chinese Waiter #2 for the rest of my life? Is America even ready for an Asian face that speaks English, that doesn't do Kung Fu?'
When I did 'Tokyo Drift,' a lot of the philosophy that Han lived by I have actually gone through in my own life. As I got older, I realized that I really believe in those philosophies, like the importance of family.
It's always on everyone's list, like, 'What's New Orleans like?' I think people have a pre-conceived idea, like it's just Mardi Gras and Bourbon Street. But really, there's so much culture, the music's great, the food's great. It's not good for the waistline! But I'm actually from the South, I'm from Georgia, so the weather doesn't bother me.
On a studio film, you don't have to worry about running out of film or messing up your costumes; you have five other sets of it. Studio films make you the most comfortable so you can just act.
I've actually started to drive slower. I never want to see a news headline that reads, 'The Chinese Guy from 'Fast & Furious' Pulled Over for a Speeding Ticket.'
The more projects you do, the more actors you meet, the more people you meet, it's harder and harder to give your heart and your complete attention or absolute sincerity to that person.
I think when we shot 'Tokyo Drift' I was a little too young to really understand what made Han who he is, and then I got older, and you start to make a little bit of money, and you realize that money will never buy you happiness.
Prior to 'Tokyo Drift,' the iconic perception of Asians in Hollywood films has been either the Kung Fu guy, the Yakuza guy or some technical genius. It used to be such a joke, to be laughed at rather than with.
Because of economics, you have to feed the demographics that are buying your product. So, as Asia becomes a much more economic influence on the products that are being made from America, I think people have to be sensitive.
I've produced before, and sometimes it's by default. In the indie level, you can't just come to set and be like, 'Oh, I'm an actor.' You have to be willing to help out, make the project happen.
A lot of times, you do independent films for passion because you may even lose money doing one, but it doesn't matter.

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