News

Al Franken Cut From PBS' Kennedy Center Tribute to David Letterman

Al Franken Cut From PBS' Kennedy Center Tribute to David Letterman
If there was a Top 10 list of reasons to scrub a celebrity’s appearance from an upcoming TV special, a sexual harassment scandal would surely come in at number one.

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken has been edited out of PBS’ David Letterman: The Mark Twain Prize special (airing Monday, 8/7c), TVLine has confirmed. The decision to cut him from the broadcast comes just days after the Saturday Night Live alum became the latest politician to be accused of sexual harassment. The network on Sunday released the following statement to TVLine:

PBS will air David Letterman: The Mark Twain Prize on Monday evening.
See full article at TVLine.com »

CBS Moves Fast to Win New Ads for James Corden, Stephen Colbert

CBS Moves Fast to Win New Ads for James Corden, Stephen Colbert
When Jimmy Kimmel launched his latenight show on ABC in 2003, he served his audience liquor and beer. In 2015, James Corden has done him one better: A miniature tavern is located directly on the set of CBS’ new “Late Late Show.”

Bottles of Rolling Rock, Beck’s, Michelob Ultra, Stella Artois and, no surprise, Bud Light and Budweiser adorn a four-seat “Bud Light Bar” seen on set every night during the program, which launched with Corden as host in March. On most nights, its presence is hard to miss. A neon Bud Light sign hangs above the bottles of suds and is easily spotted as the show comes back from a commercial. Sometimes, the bar serves as a backdrop for a sketch, as when Dana Carvey did an impression of Michael Caine or a segment called “Stage 56 Bar Tricks” that had one contestant jump rope while sitting on her rear end
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Late Show with David Letterman

Network: CBS

Episodes: 4,263 (62 minutes)

Seasons: 22

TV show dates: August 30, 1993 -- May 20, 2015

Series status: Ended

Performers include: David Letterman, Paul Schaffer, Bill Wendell, and Alan Kalter.

TV show description:

Derived from Late Night With David Letterman, this Emmy Award-winning late night talk show was born as David Letterman switched networks from NBC to CBS. It's produced by Letterman's production company Worldwide Pants Incorporated and follows much the same format as its predecessor.

(more…)
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

I'll miss you, David Letterman

  • Hitfix
I'll miss you, David Letterman
As I begin writing this I'm watching David Letterman, in one of his final appearances as host of "The Late Show," walk out to greet the audience as he's done thousands of times. He's talking about the weather in New York, again, as he's done countless times. After Wednesday, he'll never walk out onto that Ed Sullivan Theater stage and shoot the breeze about the weather again. He'll never again throw it to Paul Shaffer and the CBS Orchestra to kick off the show. The misfits, alas, will have lost their shepherd. Because at his core, that's who Letterman is and has been. He has represented the off-brand sensibilities of an audience allergic to the vanilla stylings of his cool kid contemporaries. He has been the kind of personality who could give us Stupid Pet Tricks and turn throwing a football at a meatball-topped Christmas tree into an annual tradition.
See full article at Hitfix »

Watch Eddie Vedder Serenade David Letterman With 'Better Man'

Watch Eddie Vedder Serenade David Letterman With 'Better Man'
Eddie Vedder teamed up with Paul Shaffer and the CBS Orchestra for a rousing, fitting performance of Pearl Jam's "Better Man" on The Late Show Monday night as David Letterman began his final three-night stand as host.

As Letterman noted, Vedder has taken the Ed Sullivan Theater stage numerous times since Pearl Jam first appeared on The Late Show in 1996, even once trying his hand at comedy ("I think that will probably be the highlight of the man's career," Letterman cracked). Vedder's riveting performance on Monday, however, undoubtedly earned
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Letterman’s Top 10 Legacies

David Letterman’s Top 10 Legacies
Beginning with “Late Night” on NBC in 1982 and continuing with the “Late Show With David Letterman” on CBS in 1993, the gap-toothed, be-spectacled, Indiana-born “Dave” became America’s most exceptional everyman — finding unconventional ways to point out the silliness of daily life. Here’s how his hosting style forever changed late-night TV.

10. The Top Ten List

The segment mocked the media convention (ahem) of ranking everything from the eligibility of bachelors to the popularity of songs, while shunning anything in eleventh place and beyond. It debuted in 1985 with “Things That Almost Rhyme with Peas.” Over the years, guest presenters added another layer of humor: see actor John Malkovich reading “Top Ten Things That Sound Creepy When Said by John Malkovich,” or our current president and then-senator intoning the farcical “Top Ten Barack Obama Campaign Promises” in 2008. Total Top Tens by the time the show wraps: 4,605.

9. Recurring segments fueled by absurdity

Letterman
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Top Ten Things You Didn’t Know About ‘The Late Show with David Letterman,’ Courtesy Of the People Who Write The Show

Top Ten Things You Didn’t Know About ‘The Late Show with David Letterman,’ Courtesy Of the People Who Write The Show
Because CBS’ “Late Show with David Letterman” has been on the air since 1993, it’s easy for one to think there’s nothing new to be learned about the program. You might be surprised by the wealth of detail that can be gleaned from people who work behind the scenes.

The writing staff of the long-running program took to the stage at the New York outpost of The Paley Center for Media Friday evening, part of the New York Comedy Festival. Keith Olbermann moderated a talk with 14 different scribes for the Letterman show, including head writer Matt Roberts and longtime hand Bill Scheft, who has been with Letterman’s staff since 1991.

The crew sounded an early note of melancholy, as the show’s staff is likely to find itself in need of new employment next year. David Letterman has already announced he will step down in 2015, after which CBS will replace him with Stephen Colbert.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Foo Fighters End 'Letterman' Week With Top Ten List, 'Something From Nothing'

Foo Fighters End 'Letterman' Week With Top Ten List, 'Something From Nothing'
The Foo Fighters' weeklong Late Show With David Letterman residency came to a close Friday night with the band participating in a Letterman staple: The reading of the Top Ten list. The subject: "Top Ten Things Foo Fighters Would Like To Say After Spending a Week at the Late Show." "All in all, not a bad place to be quarantined," guitarist Pat Smear joked, to which Letterman replied, "When you were a kid, did you get teased about 'Pat Smear'?" But the real highlight comes when Smear
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Foo Fighters Skewer David Letterman With Top Ten List

Foo Fighters Skewer David Letterman With Top Ten List
Foo Fighters finished up a week-long residency on The Late Show by delivering their own Top Ten list. Each of the Foos got to share two thoughts — with the most awkward moment coming when Pat Smear revealed that he's really going to miss announcer Alan Kalter. See more TV Premiere Dates 2014-15: The Complete Guide The two then gave each other googly eyes for an uncomfortably long time, to David Letterman's frustration. Check out what the rest had to say in the video below.

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Martha Thomases: TV Jones

  • Comicmix
Last Friday, in eight major television markets, CBS stations disappeared from televisions served by Time-Warner Cable. In addition, stations owned by CBS, including Showtime and the Smithsomian Channel, are also off the air.

Except there isn’t any air. And that’s part of the problem.

When television first became a business, the various stations broadcast over airwaves owned by the people and licensed by the government. Having a broadcast license was like a license to print money, and, in exchange, the owners of the license were expected to do things “in the public interest,” like news programs and public service announcements.

Because of, you know, capitalism, people learned how to make money from these forms of public service. News divisions must now be profitable. Public service ads are often underwritten by for-profit corporations, which use them as occasions to build their brands.

In other words, CBS (and the other
See full article at Comicmix »

Watch David Letterman's audience-free 'Late Show' monologue

  • Pop2it
If a comic makes a joke and no one is there to laugh, is it still funny?

You'll get to answer that question for yourself Monday night (Oct. 29) when "The Late Show with David Letterman" airs without a studio audience. Letterman (along with NBC's Jimmy Fallon) went ahead with tapings of their shows Monday afternoon as Hurricane Sandy was barreling toward New York City, and both did so without live audiences. In Letterman's case, it sounds like regular announcer Alan Kalter was absent as well.

In the snippet of Letterman's opening that CBS released, he takes to his desk to read some of his jokes rather than delivering them standing up on stage. What follows is kind of a meta-monologue, with Letterman telling us how a joke would have gone and bandleader Paul Shaffer chiming in on whether the joke is funny.

"It's a whole different perspective when you're sitting here reading them,
See full article at Pop2it »

Julia Roberts gets an offensive introduction on Letterman

Julia Roberts' "Eat, Pray, Love" promotional tour is in full effect, so the actress stopped by "The Late Show" to chat up David Letterman.

The two have always had a charming rapport, so the actress felt comfortable griping about her ill-timed intro. PopEater points out that right after Roberts' name was called in the beginning of the episode, announcer Alan Kalter followed it up with some segment about varicose veins.

"Can I just log a tiny complaint?" Roberts asks. "I'm in the dressing room watching, and in the intro [Kalter says], 'And Tonight -- Julia Roberts!' And then they say, 'A problem with varicose veins?'"

Roberts seemed to brush it off, but then brought it up again when Letterman asks her about a possible sequel to "Pretty Woman." (Sidenote: really?)

"Not with these varicose veins," she answers. Hopefully not with the killer legs she has, either.

A few other
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Gay Group Slams Letterman Over Transgender Joke

  • The Wrap
Gay Group Slams Letterman Over Transgender Joke
By Dylan Stableford

David Letterman is under fire over a joke. Again.

On Tuesday’s “Late Show,” announcer Alan Kalter interrupted Letterman during his monologue when the host mentioned that Amanda Simpson, President Obama's appointment to the Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security, is a transgender woman.

"What?!” Kalter shouted. “Amanda?! Amanda used to be a dude?! Oh my God!!"

In a letter to CBS Entertainment President Nina Tassler, Allyson Robinson of the Human Rights Campaign -- the nation’s largest gay right...
See full article at The Wrap »

Sitges ’09: My Sitges Story—Part 10

  • Fangoria
Monday, October 12

If you are not into the sun, sand and cinema that Spain’s Sitges (see last report here and go here for the fest’s official site) has to offer, the next best thing about this international film festival is the socializing. Hundreds of genre celebrities, fans and journalists have assembled in this coastal town, and this edition has witnessed such folks as Thirst’S Park Chan-wook, Tetsuo’s Shinya Tsukamoto, The Abandoned’s Nacho Cerdá (busy teaching in Barcelona, he tells me), GhostbustersIvan Reitman, [Rec] 2 helmers Paco Plaza and Jaume Belagueró (“Doing better at the box office in Spain than the first film,” Belagueró says), Day Of The Beast’s Alex de la Iglesia (looking very professorial), Orphan’s tiny terror Isabelle Fuhrman and Irreversible’S Gaspar Noé (whose controversial new film Enter The Void is debuting here), just to name a few.

Of all this terrifying talent,
See full article at Fangoria »

Sitges ’09: My Sitges Story—Part 10

  • Fangoria
Monday, October 12

If you are not into the sun, sand and cinema that Spain’s Sitges (see last report here and go here for the fest’s official site) has to offer, the next best thing about this international film festival is the socializing. Hundreds of genre celebrities, fans and journalists have assembled in this coastal town, and this edition has witnessed such folks as Thirst’S Park Chan-wook, Tetsuo’s Shinya Tsukamoto, The Abandoned’s Nacho Cerdá (busy teaching in Barcelona, he tells me), GhostbustersIvan Reitman, [Rec] 2 helmers Paco Plaza and Jaume Belagueró (“Doing better at the box office in Spain than the first film,” Belagueró says), Day Of The Beast’s Alex de la Iglesia (looking very professorial), Orphan’s tiny terror Isabelle Fuhrman and Irreversible’S Gaspar Noé (whose controversial new film Enter The Void is debuting here), just to name a few.

Of all this terrifying talent,
See full article at Fangoria »

See also

Credited With | External Sites