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The Criterion Collection Will Resurrect Night Of The Living Dead, Silence Of The Lambs With 4K Blu-Rays

The Silence of the Lambs and Night of the Living Dead, two bona fide horror gems, are officially joining the Criterion Collection.

Each film classic will receive a 4K restoration, along with scores of special features, which will be available from February 13th, 2018. Now how’s that for a Valentine’s Day treat?

On a more somber note, news of this re-release arrives at a difficult time for the horror community: Silence of the Lambs director Jonathan Demme passed away back in April, while George A. Romero, the undisputed king of zombies, died in July. Indeed, it was difficult losing two legendary filmmakers in the space of three months, but this posthumous recognition ensures their finest achievements are ushered into the pantheon of great cinema.

Each release will come with different bonus features – Lambs, for instance, includes audio commentary from Demme himself, along with Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins and screenwriter
See full article at We Got This Covered »

George A. Romero’s Night Of The Living Dead Criterion Collection Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
An absolute game-changer for the horror genre, George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead introduced the modern zombie as we know it, packing in as much social commentary as it did gore. Now, nearly 40 years after its initial release, the influential horror film is getting The Criterion Collection Blu-ray treatment it so justly deserves. Criterion is coming to get us, Barbara...

Slated for a February 13th release, The Criterion Collection Night of the Living Dead Blu-ray features a 4K digital restoration that was overseen by the late, great Romero as well as John A. Russo, Gary R. Streiner, and Russell W. Streiner. The new Blu-ray is packed with bonus features both old and new, and you can get an idea of what to expect from the official release details and cover art below, as well as information on another February 13th Criterion Collection Blu-ray release: Jonathan Demme's The Silence of the Lambs.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018

‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018
The Criterion Collection will be paying its respects to the late Jonathan Demme and George A. Romero in February 2018 by finally making “The Silence of the Lambs” and “Night of the Living Dead” members of its prestigious library. The two horror classics are joining famous titles from Kon Ichikawa, Satyajit Ray, and Tony Richardson as February additions to the Criterion Collection.

Read More:The Criterion Collection Announces January 2018 Titles, Including ‘The Breakfast Club’ and ‘I, Daniel Blake

Criterion will release a new 4K digital restoration of “The Silence of the Lambs,” which has been approved by the movie’s cinematographer Tak Fujimoto. Included on the DVD and Blu-ray sets are 35 minutes of deleted scenes and audio commentary from 1994 featuring Demme, Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, screenwriter Ted Tally, and former FBI agent John Douglas. “Night of the Living Dead” will also be released in 4K, with never-before-seen 16mm dailies included as a bonus feature.
See full article at Indiewire »

George Romero Discusses ‘Night of the Living Dead’ in Previously Unavailable 1972 Interview

George Romero Discusses ‘Night of the Living Dead’ in Previously Unavailable 1972 Interview
George Romero was making TV commercials in Pittsburgh when he created “Night Of The Living Dead.” He started with an allegorical short story and $6,000, intending to make a real blood and guts film. The seminal 1968 classic amped up the gore and redefined horror movies for fear-sated audiences in the ’60s. It’s seen as a progenitor for modern zombie pop culture. When he died July 16, 2017 in Toronto, obits declared Romero “father of the modern movie zombie.” In 1972, I spoke with Romero in Pittsburgh for Filmmakers Newsletter Magazine — in honor of today’s dedication of his star on the Walk of Fame, here is the complete interview.

Would you describe the development of “Night of the Living Dead” from the beginning?

We had $6,000 and a loose idea based on a short story I’d written which was in fact an allegorical thing. We decided to take that and turn it into a real blood and guts film, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Critical Content Takes Stake In UK’s Renowned Films – Mipcom

In a move towards international, La-based Critical Content has made a strategic investment in UK production company Renowned Films. Founded in 2012, Renowned makes unscripted, factual entertainment, features and documentaries for TV and digital. Back in 2015, Channel 4 took a share of the company that was launched by BBC radio host Duane Jones along with Max Welch and Tim Withers. The terms of the deal call for Critical to acquire the Renowned stake owned by Channel 4's…
See full article at Deadline TV »

A New Phase of Horror: Close-Up on "Night of the Living Dead"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) is playing October 1 - 31, 2017 in the United States as part of the series Prelude to Halloween.For all of its social and cinematic influence, its current notoriety as the granddaddy of the contemporary zombie movie (and television show and comic book and videogame), George A. Romero’s 1968 debut, Night of the Living Dead, was a remarkably unassuming production. Shot in mid- through late-1967 on a budget of around $114,000, with a cast and crew of unknown actors and amateur locals, the film went on to accumulate an international gross of more than $30 million, setting the standard for a progressively popular horror sub-genre in the process. One now marvels at its systematic structure, its discerning formal design, its clever manipulation of time and space, and its shrewd exploitation of generic conventions.
See full article at MUBI »

George A. Romero’s Night Of The Living Dead 4K Restoration to Screen at New York’s Film Forum This October

The great George A. Romero's films will live on forever to influence and inspire future generations of filmmakers, especially 1968's Night of the Living Dead, which invented the modern-day zombie as we know it. Late last year, The Museum of Modern Art and The Film Foundation premiered their 4K restoration of Night of the Living Dead (a restoration that was supervised by Romero himself), and this fall it will begin its screening tour in the Us, giving fans the chance to pay tribute to one of the most unique voices in independent filmmaking.

The Night of the Living Dead 4K restoration will screen on October 13th at New York's Film Forum before being shown in theaters across the Us (specific dates and cities have yet to be announced). To learn more about the restoration, visit here and read on for more details.

Press Release: The first masterwork of the
See full article at DailyDead »

George A. Romero’s Night Of The Living Dead Coming to Blu-ray This October from Mill Creek Entertainment

In the weeks since the passing of the legendary George A. Romero, fans far and wide have found comfort in revisiting his filmography, including Night of the Living Dead, which forever changed the horror genre as we know it. Soon, Mill Creek Entertainment will release what is perhaps Romero's most seminal work on Blu-ray in the USA.

As reported by Bloody Disgusting, Mill Creek Entertainment will release George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead on Blu-ray this October, on the 3rd according to Amazon and on the 17th according to Mill Creek.

No special features have been announced at this time, but we'll keep Daily Dead readers updated on further announcements, including the rumored, potential 4K Criterion Collection Blu-ray.

Directed by George A. Romero from a screenplay he co-wrote with John A. Russo, Night of the Living Dead stars Duane Jones, Judith O’Dea, Karl Hardman, and Marilyn Eastman.
See full article at DailyDead »

George Romero Was a Legend Who Never Got the Respect He Deserved

George Romero Was a Legend Who Never Got the Respect He Deserved
George A. Romero rarely had it easy. From the beginning, he faced obstacles to getting his vision on screen and condemnation once he succeeded in doing so. It took him 20 years to make his way into the big leagues, yet faced frustrating interference once he did. Yet today, the work endures. He never abandoned his vision, even when it prevented him from having an easier time of the process, and his movies, once attacked as grotesque exploitation, are now properly celebrated as landmarks of cinematic horror.

Indeed, Romero not invented more than a new and enduring kind of zombie movie when he directed “Night of the Living Dead” 50 years ago; in many ways, he invented independent horror cinema as we know it. There had been lots of off-Hollywood fright films before “Night” hit screens in 1968, of course—even some showcasing graphic if cheaply executed gore, like the Herschell Gordon Lewis flicks.
See full article at Indiewire »

George A Romero and the meaning of his zombies

Ryan Lambie Jul 18, 2017

As George A Romero sadly passes, we pay tribute to Night Of The Living Dead, and the meaning behind the writer-director's zombies...

In April 1968, director George A Romero threw some reels of film in the trunk of his car and took a long drive from Pittsburgh to New York. The grainy, black-and-white footage stored on those reels was little short of incendiary: then called Night Of The Flesh Eaters, Romero's film would, in time, change horror cinema forever.

See related  Cloak And Dagger director discusses the show's diversity The Defenders: snazzy new poster Jessica Jones season 2: Leah Gibson joins the cast

Shot on a budget of just $114,000, Night Of The Living Dead (as it was later renamed) was aggressively lo-fi: its producer, Russell Streiner, also played one of the film's first victims - he gets the immortal line, "They're coming to get you, Barbara" before
See full article at Den of Geek »

George A. Romero: A Maestro of Zombie Terror Who Created the Ultimate Horror-Movie Metaphor

George A. Romero: A Maestro of Zombie Terror Who Created the Ultimate Horror-Movie Metaphor
The first time I ever saw “Night of the Living Dead,” the low-budget masterpiece of flesh-eating midnight terror directed by George A. Romero, who died on Sunday, it was in 1974. I was at home on a lonely high-school Saturday night watching TV, and at 11:30 p.m. an oddball black-and-white movie that opened in a cemetery just kind of…appeared.

I knew absolutely nothing about it. At that point, low-budget horror films — even those that became notorious and sold a lot of tickets on the drive-in and grindhouse circuit, as “Night of the Living Dead” had — possessed an up-from-the-underground, not-quite-on-the-radar quality. They weren’t all that easy to find (especially if you were 15). Yet here was “Night of the Living Dead” on TV. As I sat there in the darkened living room, the film’s end-of-the-world atmosphere of rapacious anxiety seemed, at that moment, as if it had been fashioned for the small screen, and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Guillermo del Toro: George Romero 'Created an Entire Subgenre in Cinema'

Guillermo del Toro: George Romero 'Created an Entire Subgenre in Cinema'
George Romero's death on Sunday at age 77 inspired tributes from scores of directorial peers and acolytes praising the pioneering horror director. For Guillermo del Toro, who earlier on Sunday called Romero "one of the greatest ever," the filmmaker's contribution to cinema transcended the genre he helped conceive.

"George created an entire subgenre in cinema," del Toro tells Rolling Stone. "He singlehandedly forged the tale of the cannibalistic undead Zombies.

"Before him, the Zombie existed mainly as a vague Afro-Caribbean myth about the powers of Voodoo and such," he adds.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Stephen King, James Gunn, Jordan Peele & More Pay Tribute to George Romero

Stephen King, James Gunn, Jordan Peele & More Pay Tribute to George Romero
On Sunday, horror movie icon George A. Romero died after a battle with lung cancer, surrounded by his family.

Now, With his creative flame extinguished, many of his friends, colleagues and admirers are paying tribute to the beloved director, and sharing the ways in which his career and legacy impacted their own lives.

Horror author Stephen King -- who worked with Romero several times over the years, including their collaboration on the cult classic Creepshow in 1982 and The Dark Half in 1993 -- took to Twitter to share a few words of love for his friend.

"Sad to hear my favorite collaborator--and good old friend--George Romero has died," King wrote. "George, there will never be another like you."
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

George Romero, Rip: 4 Ways He Changed the Modern Horror Genre

  • Indiewire
George Romero, Rip: 4 Ways He Changed the Modern Horror Genre
When George Romero died at the age of 77, he was in the process of developing more zombie movies with the insightful Diy ethos that first put him on the map nearly 50 years ago with “Night of the Living Dead.” The horror community has embraced Romero over the years, and as the decades wore on, he went from being one of the genre’s most exciting contributors to its preeminent guru. Here’s an overview of the factors that contributed his legacy.

The Modern Zombie Movie

While the initial concept of zombies dates back to a mix of African and Haitian folklore, George A. Romero cemented the modern vision with his seminal 1968 classic “Night of the Living Dead.” While the word “zombie” is never uttered in the film, his spin on the lurching undead forever changed pop culture. The director cemented this legacy with five more films in the “Night of the Living Dead” series,
See full article at Indiewire »

George A. Romero, Pioneering Horror Director, Dead at 77

George A. Romero, Pioneering Horror Director, Dead at 77
George A. Romero, the Night of the Living Dead director who helped turn zombies into a pop culture phenomenon, died Sunday. He was 77.

The horror filmmaker died following a "brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer" while listening to the score of the 1952 film The Quiet Man, his producing partner Peter Grunwald told the Los Angeles Times.

In addition to Romero's revered, influential Zombie Trilogy – 1968's Night of the Living Dead, 1978's Dawn of the Dead and 1985's Day of the Dead – the director also helmed horror films like The Crazies,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Horror Highlights: Salem Horror Fest, Domitianus, Midnighters, Dances with Films 2017, Good Time

George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead will be featured at the Salem Horror Fest, and we have info on the special screening. Also in today's Horror Highlights is an excerpt from Nicholas Forristal's Domitianus, stills from Midnighters, Dances with Films 2017 details, and the trailer for A24's Good Time.

Salem Horror Fest: Press Release: "Salem, Ma. - Salem Horror Fest, in partnership with the Peabody Essex Museum and CinemaSalem, today announced four weeks of screenings, parties, concerts, panels and exhibits that explore societal themes of fear and anxiety in horror at the Halloween capital of the world; Salem, Massachusetts

Amidst the notorious backdrop of the 1692 Witch Trials, the festival will feature a city-wide program set to kick off at the Peabody Essex Museum on Thursday, September 21 as part of the Pem/Pm evening party series in conjunction with their upcoming exhibit “It’s Alive” Classic Horror and Sci-Fi
See full article at DailyDead »

How Filmmakers And Film Critics Need To Adapt In the Age Of President Trump — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
How Filmmakers And Film Critics Need To Adapt In the Age Of President Trump — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday morning. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In the wake of the election, Filmmaker Magazine published a piece about the intrinsically political nature of movies, in which the writer argued: “For the next four years (and long afterwards), every time someone leaves a movie theater feeling contented, feeling set in their values, feeling numbed and entertained and nothing else, that’s a problem.”

How does filmmaking — and film criticism — need to adapt in the age of Trump?

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

Filmmakers need to make films and film critics need to write about them. None of them need instruction; the hardest thing in good and bad times
See full article at Indiewire »

Q&A: Michael Coast Discusses Ben’s Journey in Night Of The Living Dead: Revival Graphic Novel Soul

  • DailyDead
Brought to life with a powerful performance by Duane Jones in George A. Romero's Night of the Living Dead, Ben is a beloved and compelling character from horror cinema. Despite what happened to him onscreen, Ben's story continued over the past year in Double Take's comic book series Soul, a key part of their Night of the Living Dead: Revival universe. With the five-issue Soul now available as a graphic novel (which can also be read in digital form right here on Daily Dead), we caught up once again with writer/editor Michael Coast to discuss the intriguing series that breathed new life into Ben. [Spoiler warning if you haven't read all five issues of Soul.]

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Michael. Ben from Night of the Living Dead is such an iconic cinematic character. What was the most daunting part of approaching his story and taking it in a new direction in Soul?
See full article at DailyDead »

George Romero Says Nobody Will Finance His Next Zombie Movie and ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Wouldn’t Get Made Today

George Romero Says Nobody Will Finance His Next Zombie Movie and ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Wouldn’t Get Made Today
For nearly 50 years, George Romero has lived with a zombie legacy. In 1968, he directed “Night of the Living Dead” on a bare-bones budget. The movie’s resonance today is undeniable: The walking dead are the biggest motif of the modern horror genre, and millions of fans have Romero to thank for it. However, Romero himself has maintained a complicated relationship with his eerie creations. While he directed a series of sequels to “Night” over the course of many decades, it’s been seven years since his last entry, “Survival of the Dead.” But that’s not for lack of trying.

Still, Romero can rest easy on the cultural impact of his first zombie movie, which continues to receive institutional support. On November 5, the Museum of Modern Art will present a new 4k restoration of “Night of the Living Dead” as part of its To Save and Project festival taking place throughout the month.
See full article at Indiewire »

October Horrors Day 1 – Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Night of the Living Dead, 1968

Directed by George A Romero

Starring Duane Jones, Judith O’Dea, Karl Hardman and Marylin Eastmen

Synopsis:

Barbara and her brother Johnny are visiting their mother’s grave when the two are attacked by deranged assailants and Johnny is killed. Barbara manages to escape to a seemingly abandoned farmhouse, whereupon she is joined by fellow survivors as they come to terms with the fact that they are under attack from the walking dead. Plans are made and tensions flare as the survivors struggle to work together as the hungry masses gather outside, eager to feast upon the occupants inside.

This is the film that arguably created the modern cinematic depiction of the zombie. It created the now tried and tested plot of survivors under siege, with the flesh-hungry hordes beating at the doors eager to feast upon them. Without this film, you would not have video games like Resident Evil,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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