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‘Dunkirk (1958)’ DVD Review

Stars: John Mills, Richard Attenborough, Bernard Lee, Robert Urquhart, Ray Jackson, Ronald Hines, Sean Barrett, Roland Curram, Meredith Edwards, Michael Bates, Maxine Audley, Lionel Jeffries | Written by David Divine, W.P. Lipscomb | Directed by Leslie Norman

While this year’s Dunkirk brought an intensity to the screen conveying the horrors of what was experienced by the soldiers at Dunkirk, there was a version of that same story that was released back in 1958. Now digitally restored and available on DVD and Blu-ray, this Dunkirk is an interesting look at how the true events affected many people.

When Nazi Germany invaded France, the British army found themselves in retreat. Making their way to Dunkirk which was the only means of escape, Operation Dynamo was put into action to get the soldiers out of France and home.

What is interesting about this version of Dunkirk is the fact it is a darker look at
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blast-Off

An admiring nod to ’60s dream siren Daliah Lavi! American-International leaps into an epic Jules Verne comedy about a trip to the moon, a good-looking but slow and unfunny farce that must squeak by on the goodwill of its cast of comedians. Burl Ives is excellent casting as P.T. Barnum, promoting a Greatest Show Off the Earth.

Blast-Off

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1967 / Color/ 2:35 widescreen / 119 99, 95 min. / Street Date March 21, 2017 / Those Fantastic Flying Fools; Jules Verne’s Rocket to the Moon / available through Olive Films / 29.95

Starring: Burl Ives, Terry-Thomas, Gert Fröbe, Lionel Jeffries, Troy Donahue, Daliah Lavi, Dennis Price, Hermione Gingold, Jimmy Clitheroe, Graham Stark, Edward de Souza, Judy Cornwell, Allan Cuthbertson, Sinéd Cusack, Maurice Denham.

Cinematography: Reginald H. Wyer

Film Editor: Ann Chegwidden

Original Music: John Scott

Written by Dave Freeman, Peter Welbeck (Harry Allan Towers) inspired by the writings of Jules Verne

Produced by Harry Allan Towers

Directed by Don Sharp
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Deddie Davies obituary

Actor who appeared in several popular TV dramas and sitcoms and memorably played Mrs Perks in the 1970 film The Railway Children

Deddie Davies, who has died of ovarian cancer aged 78, will be remembered as Nell, wife of the station porter Mr Perks, in The Railway Children, the director Lionel Jeffries’s lovingly made 1970 film adaptation of Edith Nesbit’s Edwardian novel.

The character brings the three children – played by Jenny Agutter, Sally Thomsett and Gary Warren – into Perks’s home life, away from the railway station where they have their adventures. “It’s a birthday such as Perks never had, not even when he were a boy,” she tells them on seeing the gifts they have collected from villagers. When Perks (Bernard Cribbins) insists he will not accept charity, Mrs Perks looks on fretfully as they persuade him that the presents were donated with kindness and respect.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971) Blu-ray / DVD Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
Giving the Brothers Grimm tale Hansel and Gretel a facelift is Curtis Harrington’s Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971), which will be released on Blu-ray / DVD on August 16th courtesy of Kino Lorber.

From Kino Lorber: “Coming August 16th on DVD and Blu-ray!

Brand New 2016 HD Master!

Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971)

• Audio Commentary with Film Historian David Del Valle and Film Scholar Nathaniel Bell

• Trailers”

Synopsis (via Blu-ray.com): “This is a retelling of the old tale of Hansel and Gretel, but set in England in the 1920’s. To the children and staff at the orphanage, Auntie Roo is a kindly American widow who gives them a lavish Christmas party each year in her mansion, Forrest Grange. In reality, she is a severely disturbed woman, who keeps the mummified remains of her little daughter in a nursery in the attic. One Christmas, her eye falls upon a little girl
See full article at DailyDead »

Book Review: "Family Films In Global Cinema: The World Beyond Disney"

  • CinemaRetro
Family Films in Global Cinema: The World Beyond Disney

Edited by Noel Brown and Bruce Babington (Published by I.B. Taurus, £62), 272 Pages, Hardcover, Isbn: 9781784530082

By Tim Greaves

Comprising a well-researched and eminently readable series of essays from around a dozen contributing writers, “Family Films in Global Cinema” delivers just what its title promises. Rather than focussing on a particular era or subgenre, editors Noel Brown and Bruce Babington have cast their net far wider; titles spanning many decades and from all corners of the globe are afforded textual equality with some of the more readily acknowledged classics. Fancy reading refreshing opinions on Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory or A Nightmare Before Christmas (the latter rejected by Disney, who must still be kicking themselves today)? They’re here, nestled alongside plenty of titles of which this reviewer was largely unaware. Of particular interest was a chapter devoted to the anime
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

DVD Review: "The Prisoner Of Zenda" (1979) Starring Peter Sellers And Elke Sommer; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Although he was regarded as a comedy genius, the sad truth is that Peter Sellers was more often than not misused in big screen comedies. After making it big on British TV  and in feature films in the late 1950s, Sellers became an international sensation with his acclaimed work in big studio feature films such as "Lolita", "Dr. Strangelove", "The World of Henry Orient" and the first entries in the "Pink Panther" series. Through the mid-Sixties, he did impressive work in films like "After the Fox", "The Wrong Box" and "What's New Pussycat?" If the films weren't classics, at least they presented some of Sellers' off-the-wall ability to deliver innovative characters and comedic situations. By the late Sixties, however, his own personal demons began to get the better of him. Sellers was the epitome of the classic clown: laughing on the outside but crying on the inside.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

DVD Review: "Baxter!" (1973) Starring Scott Jacoby, Patricia Neal And Britt Ekland

  • CinemaRetro
(This review pertains to the UK Region 2 DVD release).

By Tim Greaves

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I first encountered Lionel Jeffries’ 1973 melodrama Baxter! during the summer of 1978 on what I believe to be its one and only British television airing by the BBC. Its conspicuous absence on video in the UK – and, until 2014, DVD – meant that, for me, some 36 years elapsed between viewings. A small, and in many respects not particularly memorable film, it nevertheless stayed with me over the intervening years for, I think, two reasons. The first was its unexpectedly dark nature, which completely caught me off guard given the family friendly nature of the director’s previous films, The Railway Children and The Amazing Mr Blunden; best remembered for his myriad of on-screen performances, Baxter! was in fact the third of only five projects which positioned Jeffries on the other side of the camera.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The movies we hope Marvel and DC aren’t developing

  • Den of Geek
From Squirrel Girl to Doorman, we look at Marvel and DC's more unusual comic properties...

Odd List

Recently on this site, we scoped out the 13 hottest DC properties vying for Warner Brothers’ nine movie slots announced this April. What we didn’t discuss though, was the hordes of ruddy awful comic book properties lurking in the DC and Marvel vaults. In these deepest, darkest corners are characters we’ve tried to forget, and stories we pray never make it to the big screen.

Sadly, however many lengthy features you write, and whatever logic you apply, you can never accurately second guess what studios will do next. For example, who would’ve thought a few years ago that we’d have a recognisable, popular, live-action Green Arrow on TV before The Flash or Wonder Woman had made it to the screen?

So, to prepare ourselves for the worst, we delved into
See full article at Den of Geek »

Updating Classic Movies with Modern Technology

  • HeyUGuys
Over the years there have been many attempts to update treasured movies. Whether it’s the sacrilegious colourisation of nevergreen classics such as It’s a Wonderful Life or the (more interesting) bookending of revered films with sequels and prequels there’s nothing quite as enticing to an eager studio as a well-known and well-loved classic.

Problems arise however when technological and social advances become obstacles to those filmmakers insistent on sticking as closely as possibly to the beloved original. Mobile phones, for example, would save hundreds of those previously in peril, CCTV and Gps tracking would have made a mockery of many a murder mystery; and Google Earth comes to the rescue of those lost in any number of haunted woods.

We’ve taken a look at some classic films and what an update might mean. Let’s begin with a beloved film -

Casablanca

Set in the heaving
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Graham Stark obituary

Prolific comedy actor who worked with Peter Sellers, Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan and Hattie Jacques

The stony-faced, beaky comedy actor Graham Stark, who has died aged 91, is best remembered for his appearances alongside Peter Sellers, notably in the Pink Panther movies. His familiar face and voice, on television and radio, were part of the essential furniture in the sitting room of our popular culture for more than half a century. A stalwart in the national postwar comedy boom led by Sellers, Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Dick Emery, Eric Sykes and Benny Hill, he worked with them all in a sort of unofficial supporting repertory company that also included Hattie Jacques, Deryck Guyler, Patricia Hayes and Arthur Mullard. He was also a man of surprising and various parts: child actor, trained dancer, film-maker, occasional writer, and dedicated and critically acclaimed photographer.

Like Gypsy Rose Lee, he had a resourceful and determined
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Graham Stark obituary

Prolific comedy actor who worked with Peter Sellers, Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan and Hattie Jacques

The stony-faced, beaky comedy actor Graham Stark, who has died aged 91, is best remembered for his appearances alongside Peter Sellers, notably in the Pink Panther movies. His familiar face and voice, on television and radio, were part of the essential furniture in the sitting room of our popular culture for more than half a century. A stalwart in the national postwar comedy boom led by Sellers, Tony Hancock, Spike Milligan, Dick Emery, Eric Sykes and Benny Hill, he worked with them all in a sort of unofficial supporting repertory company that also included Hattie Jacques, Deryck Guyler, Patricia Hayes and Arthur Mullard. He was also a man of surprising and various parts: child actor, trained dancer, film-maker, occasional writer, and dedicated and critically acclaimed photographer.

Like Gypsy Rose Lee, he had a resourceful and determined
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Virgins and Prostitutes: Jones' Movies on TCM

Shirley Jones Movies: Innocent virgins and sex workers galore (photo: Shirley Jones and Burt Lancaster in ‘Elmer Gantry’) (See previous post: “Shirley Jones: From Book to Movies.”) I haven’t watched The Cheyenne Social Club (1970), a comedy Western directed by Gene Kelly, and starring 62-year-old James Stewart as a cowpoke who inherits an establishment that turns out to be a popular house of prostitution. Henry Fonda plays Stewart’s partner. And I’m sure Shirley Jones, as one of the sex workers, looks lovely in the film. Hopefully, director Kelly gave this likable, talented actress the chance to do more than just stand around looking pretty. But then again … For all purposes, The Cheyenne Social Club ended Shirley Jones’ film stardom; that same year she turned to TV and The Partridge Family. Jones would return to films only nine years later, as one of several stars (among them Michael Caine,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Railway Children' gets first BBFC complaint after 42 years

'Railway Children' gets first BBFC complaint after 42 years
The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) has received its first ever complaint for The Railway Children.

One viewer complained that the 1970 movie starring Call the Midwife's Jenny Agutter may lead to children playing near railway tracks, reports BBC News.

"The correspondent was concerned that children may be encouraged to play on railway tracks as a result of seeing the film," the BBFC's annual report stated.

Directed by Lionel Jeffries, the classic film also starred Bernard Cribbins, Dinah Sheridan and Sally Thomsett.

Published today (July 11), the report ruled that it was "very unlikely" that The Railway Children would encourage "such dangerous activity".

"The Railway Children is set in the Edwardian period and trains and access to railway property are very different today," the censor said.

"The film also demonstrates the potential harm to children if proper care is not taken."

Senior examiner Craig Lapper added that while the film holds a U rating,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Bryan Forbes: film director, actor and writer

Creative force in the British film industry whose work included The Stepford Wives and Whistle Down the Wind

The director, actor and writer Bryan Forbes, who has died aged 86, was one of the most creative forces in the British film industry of the 1960s, and the Hollywood films he directed included the original version of The Stepford Wives (1974). In later life he turned to the writing of books, both fiction and memoirs.

The turning point for him in cinema was the formation of the independent company Beaver Films with his friend Richard Attenborough in 1958. For the screenplay of their first production, The Angry Silence (1960), Forbes received an Oscar nomination and a Bafta award. Attenborough played a factory worker shunned and persecuted for not joining a strike. His colleagues are shown as being manipulated by skulking professional agitators and to some it seemed more like a political statement than a human
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

How we made: The Railway Children

Actors Jenny Agutter and Sally Thomsett recall bunking off to a Leeds nightclub and being banned from driving during the making of the classic 1970 children's film

Jenny Agutter, actor

I was reluctant to accept the role of Roberta because I'd played her two years earlier in a BBC series, and had since left school. I'd filmed Nicolas Roeg's Walkabout, so it felt like going backwards. But the director Lionel Jeffries was such an exuberant personality, you couldn't say no.

He was also a fine actor and, whether deliberately or subconsciously, assumed the role of an Edwardian father figure while filming. If a take went well, he'd give us half a crown – I wondered how far he thought that would go down the pub. Once, Sally [Thomsett, who played Phyllis] and I slipped out, and when we got back he was waiting, pointing at his watch and saying he hoped we would be fit for filming the next morning.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

How we made: The Railway Children

Actors Jenny Agutter and Sally Thomsett recall bunking off to a Leeds nightclub and being banned from driving during the making of the classic 1970 children's film

I was reluctant to accept the role of Roberta because I'd played her two years earlier in a BBC series, and had since left school. I'd filmed Nicolas Roeg's Walkabout, so it felt like going backwards. But the director Lionel Jeffries was such an exuberant personality, you couldn't say no.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review - Nowhere to Go (1958)

Nowhere to Go, 1958.

Directed by Seth Holt.

Starring George Nader, Maggie Smith, Bernard Lee, Harry H. Corbett and Lionel Jeffries.

Synopsis:

After breaking out of prison, a thief and conman attempts to flee the country only to end up on the run in the Welsh countryside.

Don’t expect to sympathise with a man like Paul Gregory (George Nader). He’s used up his friends, burned all his bridges and leeched off the goodwill of strangers long enough. Cool indifference and conversational sleight of hand are his professional trademark. He engineers friendships, cultivates sympathy and expects everyone to consider human relations in the same manner.

Paul Gregory is a con man. It’d be more honest to call him a high-functioning sociopath, as the actions that lead him from one disaster to the next all hinge on his inability to truly feel anything for anyone else. He says his friends call him ‘Greg’. What friends?
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

10 (Kind Of) Great Classic Sci-Fi Flicks You May Have Never Heard Of

We know the greats; movies like Metropolis (1927), Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Star Wars (1977).

And there are those films which maybe didn’t achieve cinematic greatness, but through their inexhaustible watchability became genre touchstones, lesser classics but classics nonetheless, like The War of the Worlds (1953), Godzilla (1954), Them! (1954), The Time Machine (1960).

In the realm of science fiction cinema, those are the cream (and below that, maybe the half and half). But sci fi is one of those genres which has often too readily leant itself to – not to torture an analogy — producing nonfat dairy substitute.

During the first, great wave of sci fi movies in the 1950s, the target audience was kids and teens. There wasn’t a lot in the way of “serious” sci fi. Most of it was churned out quick and cheap; drive-in fodder, grist for the Saturday matinee mill.

By the early 1960s,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

"Trailers From Hell" Presents "First Men In The Moon"

  • CinemaRetro
 

Trolling through Joe Dante's Trailers From Hell site, we came across this: the original trailer for the marvelous 1964 sci-fi flick First Men in the Moon starring Edward Judd and Lionel Jeffries as Victorian era astronauts, with effects by Ray Harryhausen. John Landis provides the suitably enthusiastic commentary on the trailer. Click here to view

Click here to order special edition DVD from Amazon for less than $5!
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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