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‘Twins 2’ Screenplay Almost Complete – Shoot Set For Early 2018

A sequel to the 1980s classic comedy Twins is in the works, and it looks like it may be closer to production than we initially thought. Speaking to Business Insider, Arnold Schwarzenegger, who will return to reprise the role of Julius in the sequel, said that Triplets, is set to have its screenplay locked down in two weeks, and a shoot is already set for 2018. More on the Triplets shooting details below.

Triplets shooting details: Twins sequel to go before cameras in 2018

“I had a conversation yesterday with my agent and he said that the script will be finished in 14 days,” Schwarzenegger said. “Ivan Reitman is extremely happy with what he’s seen so far, he just wants to make a few tweaks, so that’s music to my ears. I think sometime beginning of next year we can shoot the film.”

“We are in touch with each other all the time,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The Tick review: a laugh-out-loud superhero satire

Ron Hogan Aug 25, 2017

The Tick, out now on Amazon Prime Video, is huge fun. Here's how the show achieves what its creator envisioned 21 years ago...

In 1994, I was about to be a freshman in high school. Despite being “too old” for cartoons, there wasn’t really anything else on television on Saturday mornings while I was waiting for wrestling to show up on my television screen. I remember most of the cartoons I saw only in the vaguest terms: the creepy face of Louie Anderson’s gargoyle animated child or a screaming purple cat. I know the name of both shows because I looked them up prior to writing this article, but I couldn’t tell you anything about them. However, one show I watched regularly in the mid to late 90s stuck with me well into adulthood, and that’s the 1994-96 animated version of The Tick.

See related
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Twin Peaks’: Let’s Talk About the Birth of Bob, Laura Palmer, the Woodsmen and Whatever That Critter Is

‘Twin Peaks’: Let’s Talk About the Birth of Bob, Laura Palmer, the Woodsmen and Whatever That Critter Is
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Twin Peaks” Episode 8 titled “Part 8 – Gotta Light?”]

What was only hinted at in the third episode of “Twin Peaks” became a full-blown surrealistic experience in Sunday’s avant-garde “Part 8.”

Despite the experimental filmmaking and very little dialogue, the 50-minute bombardment of sound and fury coalesced into an intriguing origin story that promised a lot more sense in the contemporary story to come. Giving historical context to some of the things we’ve seen so far anchors the story in a way that it hasn’t been before. But this wasn’t just the story of one birth, but of many. Let’s break those and a few other theories down:

Read More: ‘Twin PeaksReview: Part 8 Aims for Maximum Weirdness and Succeeds

What About Bob?

The evil spirit (Frank Silva) we first met in the original series has been riding along with Evil Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) in some sort of weird, mutual symbiosis. It seemed that
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: Let’s Talk About the Birth of Bob, Laura Palmer, the Woodsmen and Whatever That Critter Is

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks’: Let’s Talk About the Birth of Bob, Laura Palmer, the Woodsmen and Whatever That Critter Is
[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “Twin Peaks” Episode 8 titled “Part 8 – Gotta Light?”]

What was only hinted at in the third episode of “Twin Peaks” became a full-blown surrealistic experience in Sunday’s avant-garde “Part 8.”

Despite the experimental filmmaking and very little dialogue, the 50-minute bombardment of sound and fury coalesced into an intriguing origin story that promised a lot more sense in the contemporary story to come. Giving historical context to some of the things we’ve seen so far anchors the story in a way that it hasn’t been before. But this wasn’t just the story of one birth, but of many. Let’s break those and a few other theories down:

Read More: ‘Twin PeaksReview: Part 8 Aims for Maximum Weirdness and Succeeds

What About Bob?

The evil spirit (Frank Silva) we first met in the original series has been riding along with Evil Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) in some sort of weird, mutual symbiosis. It seemed that
See full article at Indiewire »

Twin Peaks: Who are Phillip Jeffries and Blue Rose?

  • BuzzSugar
It doesn't seem possible, but Twin Peaks gets even weirder and more bizarre with episodes three and four. However, beyond the "normal" David Lynchian aspects that will all make sense as the show unfolds (or not), there are a couple references that may have had you wracking your brain to remember just exactly what they mean in the Twin Peaks universe: Phillip Jeffries and Blue Rose. If those mentions leave you a little befuddled, we're here to help. Phillip Jeffries Understanding this reference is based entirely on having seen the 1992 Twin Peaks prequel movie, Fire Walk With Me. In the film, Jeffries is an FBI agent played by David Bowie. (It was rumored that Bowie was going to shoot some scenes for Twin Peaks: The Return but didn't get a chance to before his untimely death in early 2016.) In the film, Jeffries is an agent who suddenly appears to Gordon Cole
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Letter: Sir Antony Jay obituary

Tony Jay was a graduate trainee at the BBC when he joined me at Sportsview in 1956. I asked him to produce a relatively simple programme: the football results at 5pm on a Saturday. He achieved what no one else before or since has done: the results appeared on the TV screen upside down.

He moved on to the Tonight programme, where he became the most civilised and, by a distance, the wittiest member of a talented team.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Twin Peaks' cast list: 11 major omissions, from Lara Flynn Boyle to Heather Graham

  • Hitfix
'Twin Peaks' cast list: 11 major omissions, from Lara Flynn Boyle to Heather Graham
What a way to start off the week! The formidable cast list for Showtime's forthcoming Twin Peaks revival series was revealed this morning, and man, is it a doozy. In addition to boasting such key returning players as Kyle MacLachlan (Dale Cooper), Sheryl Lee (Laura Palmer/Maddy Ferguson) and Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne), there are a number of surprising A-listers in the mix including Michael Cera, Trent Reznor, Amanda Seyfried and Naomi Watts. On the downside, a not-insignificant number of cast members from both the original series and the 1992 prequel film Fire Walk with Me are completely absent from the list. Where, for instance, is Lara Flynn Boyle (or Moira Kelly, for that matter)? Michael Ontkean? Piper Laurie? Joan Chen? Anyone from the mill? (Literally, there is no one from the mill.) So while I'm thankful that most of the major players are back in action, I can't help but
See full article at Hitfix »

Prejudice and a BBC pioneer - the amazing story of Grace Wyndham Goldie

At the BBC in the 1940s and 50s, Goldie invented TV formats that are still used today. Charlotte Higgins salutes a charismatic, tough-minded woman with an eye for a good programme

On the night of 23 February 1950 the evening’s television began with the usual announcement of the schedule. There would be films, including an American slapstick with Charley Chase, and, as customary, the 9pm news delivered in sound only. But this was an exceptional evening: the night of the general election, with Clement Attlee’s huge 1945 majority contested by Winston Churchill. The turnout that day was an immense 83.9%.

Both TV studios at Alexandra Palace were ready to go after a flurry of preparations and a blizzard of paperwork: in one there were 12ft-tall maps on the walls, as well as a library ladder on wheels, a pointer and sticks of charcoal; in the other, there was a chart laid out like a cricket scoreboard,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Jungle Book 2 -The Blu Review

The Disney Dtv sequels have become a bit if an embarrassment to the Disney legacy. There have been a lot of them and for every Toy Story 2 there are a half dozen cash-ins like Aladdin The Return Of Jafar, Beauty And The Beast’S Enchanted Christmas, and Lilo And Stitch – Stitch Has A Glitch. Most seemed rushed with inferior animation, weak tunes, and lame scripts. They may have worked their way into the wallets of the Disney fans, but not their hearts.

Let’s face it – topping Phil Harris and his classic jungle jive in the original 1967 Jungle Book wasn’t going to happen but 2003’s Jungle Book 2 was better than most sequels, had an impressive voice cast, and was wise enough to include the Jb signature tune “The Bear Necessities” not once but three times! The film’s animation was more detailed and vivid than most of Disney
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Disney 53: The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise.

1996/91 minutes

Perhaps the darkest film for the Disney 53, and certainly of the Renaissance period, The Hunchback Of Notre Dame was the first to focus on a major religion, and led to some controversy during production, mostly due to the heavy subject matter. There were many issues that caused friction between the creative team and the studio, notably the character of Frollo, his profession and motivation.

Like many/most of Disney’s adaptations, The Hunchback Of Notre Dame is considerably lighter, and somewhat happier than Victor Hugo’s original novel, but its themes of religion, racism, moral and social commentary and the rights of all peoples to exist in peace remain firmly in place.

Synopsis: Paris, the fifteenth century; the kindly, deformed Quasimodo lives a lonely existence within the belltower of Notre Dame cathedral. His only living companions are a trio of stone Grotesques (not Gargoyles,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney 53: Beauty And The Beast

We at Thn love our Disney movies. And with Frozen, the 53rd animated feature film, looming ever closer, Thn takes a look back at its forebears, from 1937′s Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, through the wilderness years of the 1970s to the Disney Renaissance of the ’90s.

This week, Beauty And The Beast.

Directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise

Based upon “Beauty and the Beast”, by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont

1991/84 Minutes

In the beginning, there was Snow White, which proved to be a turning point in the history of the company, and of animated motion pictures as a whole. Whilst casting the net for more traditional tales to retell, Disney considered Beauty and the Beast but despite returning to the project in the 1950s, the project was deemed to challenging and dropped again- although some, notably Peter M. Nichols of The New York Times, speculate that Disney
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Disney Classics Double Feature Part II: The Jungle Book

Throughout the year, Thn will look at 53 Walt Disney Animated Classics, from Snow White to Wreck-it Ralph, through the obscurity of Fun And Fancy Free to the second Golden Age of Beauty And The Beast. These are the films the Walt Disney company are most proud of, the ones that hold a special place in our hearts, the ones that still cost a fortune to buy on DVD.

In the second part of this week’s double hitter, we look for some bear necessities with The Jungle Book.

Directed by Wolfgang Reitherman

1967/ 78 minutes

The Jungle Book marked a return of sorts for Walt Disney; after only being partially involved in One Hundred And One Dalmatians and The Sword In The Stone, the latter’s disappointing performance led Disney to take a more active role in the film’s story. He threw out storyman Bill Peet’s original script, which closely
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Blu-ray Review - The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, 1996.

Directed by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise.

Featuring the voice talents of Tom Hulce, Demi Moore, Kevin Kline, Paul Kandel, Jason Alexander, Charles Kimbrough, David Ogden Stiers, Tony Jay and Mary Wickes.

Synopsis:

At the urging of his gargoyle pals, Quasimodo leave the solitary safety of his tower, venturing out to find his first true friend, the gypsy beauty Esmeralda. The most unlikely of heroes, Quasi fights to save the people and the city he loved and, in turn, helps us to see people for who they are, rather than how they appear.

Among a line of hits for Disney in the 1990s - including The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King and Mulan - The Hunchback of Notre Dame is little remembered, but it’s one of the more striking and entertaining, and deftly engages with themes of religious prejudice and state power,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Sequel Blu-ray Review

By the time Disney released The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the famed animated movie house was on the tail end of its 90's renaissance period, releasing hit after hit and reaffirming itself as the one true animation powerhouse of its day. While The Hunchback of Notre Dame is quite serviceable, with some compelling animation and a rousing song or two, it is terribly uneven and feels like the beginning of the end of that era of Disney animated films.

The story, based off of Victor Hugo's 1831 novel of the same name, follows Quasimodo (Tom Hulce), a deformed young man that was orphaned just after birth and taken in by the deplorable Minister of Justice, Frollo (Tony Jay). Quasimodo has been forced to live out his years in the solitude of the grand Notre Dame cathedral, believing himself to be a monster that the public would ridicule on sight, thanks to Frollo's misleading ways.
See full article at TheHDRoom »

The Hunchback Of Notre Dame/The Hunchback Of Notre Dame II - Blu-ray Review

Victor Hugo devotees will not exactly like what Disney did to his classic novel, but musical and animation devotees may be able to forgive. Some still might not be able to being forced to buy the inferior direct-to-video sequel. Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996): In 15th century Paris, Minister Frollo (Tony Jay) pursues the law with an iron fist, especially against gypsies. His pursuit ends with a mother dead and her deformed baby nearly cast into a well. The Archdeacon of Notre Dame (David Ogden Stiers) tells Frollo that can.t murder the child at the steps of the massive cathedral. Frollo fears for his mortal soul so he has the Archdeacon raise Quasimodo (Tom Hulce) as the
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Blu-ray Debuts March 12th, 2013

  • MovieWeb
Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Blu-ray Debuts March 12th, 2013
Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment is releasing Who Framed Roger Rabbit? on Blu-ray March 12, 2013. The studio is also releasing two-packs featuring The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Hunchback of Notre Dame II, Mulan and Mulan II and Brother Bear and Brother Bear 2 on the same date. Take a look at the artwork and release details for these four new Blu-ray's.

Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Blu-ray - $26.50 Srp

A toon hating detective is a cartoon rabbit's only hope to prove his innocence when he is accused of murder. Four time Academy Award Winner (1988) for Best Film Editing, Best Visual Effects, Best Sound Effects Editing and Special Achievement in Animation Direction.

Special Features:

The Roger Rabbit Shorts (Digitally Restored) - Tummy Trouble, Roller-Coaster Rabbit & Trail Mix-UpWho Made Roger Rabbit?Theatrical TrailerDeleted Scene: "Pig's Head"On Set! Benny The CabBehind The Ears: The True StoryBefore & After Split-ScreenToon Stand-InsFeature Audio CommentaryToontown
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Five Best Disney Films

In spite of having grown up as a part of the Disney “VHS Generation”, one of the first groups of children to have the privilege and opportunity to enjoy nearly every Disney classic in the comfort of my home on demand, I don’t have much nostalgia for my childhood favourites. They still have a special place in my heart because they undeniably have a hand in the person I have become, but they have since been replaced by other Disney films I didn’t necessarily appreciate as a child.

I have my qualms with Disney, none of which I plan on getting into right here, but I can appreciate many of their films for their artistry and heartfelt sentiment. This list does not reflect the tastes and impulses of my childhood self, but the obsessions and preferences of my young adulthood. That isn’t to say there isn’t any nostalgia involved,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

20 Greatest Classic Disney Villains

The saying goes that the hero of your story is only as great as your villain, On podcast #124 I made a bold statement that the key difference between classic Disney movies and Pixar films is their villains. I love Pixar films, but in my mind classic Disney movies like The Jungle Book and The Lion King are still superior films, principally because they all have the missing ingredient Pixar lacks; iconic, classic and memorable villains. Pixar films are anything but weak, some credit must go towards the heroic characters who inspire courage, hope and charm their ways into our hears, but the same can't be said about the Pixar characters whose job it is to create havoc and fear with their malicious deeds. Whether you love or hate Disney, it cannot be denied that they have come up with some greatest on screen villains in movie-making history. Here is my
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Ice Age: The Meltdown

In the energetic sequel "Ice Age: The Meltdown", youngsters may fret over whether the animal heroes will reach their new home safely, parents may wonder how all this melting ice pack parallels the current concerns over global warming, and 20th Century Fox Animation may have to figure out what to do with the bounty undoubtedly flowing its way from boxoffice and DVD coffers. Ray Romano again heads the voice cast, reunited with John Leguizamo and Denis Leary from the original 2002 "Ice Age".

The story gets under way with the zany sloth Sid (Leguizamo) running a day camp for young animals. His old buddies -- the mature woolly mammoth Manny (Ray Romano) and the dryly witty saber-toothed tiger Diego (Leary) -- make Sid realize that he is really quite unsuitable as any kind of role model. Con artist armadillo Fast Tony Jay Leno) alerts the various breeds that a global warming will imminently melt the enormous glacial dam that protects their valley. Oceans of water will flood the landscape, thus they must embark on a trek toward safety. It is at this point that the very good CGI effects are never more impressive, as the enormous scope of their changing environmental habitat is revealed.

The charm of the original film was its endearing character development, mixing humor with personality traits with real dimension (not all that unlike Romano's former smash-hit TV sitcom, "Everybody Loves Raymond"). This lifts "Meltdown" above many other animated efforts. Along their trip, each of the three leads gets a story arc: Manny may be the last of his species, that is until Ellie (Queen Latifah) shows up, a mammoth who thinks she's an opossum, like her sidekicks Crash Seann William Scott) and Eddie (Josh Peck). Sid, the Rodney Dangerfield of sloths, finds respect in a fun midnight-cult sequence. And Diego struggles to face a long-held fear.

In most respects, this sequel is better than the original. No human characters appear this time, so it's a more seamless animal tale. Although Diego's tiger is more of a pussycat here, the film's overall story line, complete with predatory prehistoric alligator creatures, is more involving. Even clocking in 11 minutes longer than "Ice Age", director Carlos Saldanha (who received co-director credit on the original) has made a vivid and entertaining (and educational?) family film that never flags.

Highlights include the tender depiction of Ellie's life-changing moment when she recognizes her childhood home is now completely melted; a rousing all-vulture version of "Food, Glorious Food" from "Oliver!"; and, last but hardly least, Scrat, the unspeaking squirrel/rat, back from the first film with more silly screen time. He is still risking life and limb on sheer, frozen cliffs above and below icy water in pursuit of that elusive acorn. Scrat's intermittent sequences are episodic, like chapters of an old serial -- and like those old serials, the kids will eat it up.

ICE AGE: THE MELTDOWN

20th Century Fox

20th Century Fox Animation presents a Blue Sky Studios production

Credits:

Director: Carlos Saldanha

Screenwriters: Peter Gaulke, Gerry Swallow, Jim Hecht

Story by: Peter Gaulke, Gerry Swallow

Producer: Lori Forte

Executive producers: Christopher Meledandri, Chris Wedge

Art director: Thomas Cardone

Character designer: Peter de Seve

Music: John Powell

Editor: Harry Hitner. Voices: Manny: Ray Romano

Sid: John Leguizamo

Diego: Denis Leary

Ellie: Queen Latifah

Crash: Seann William Scott

Eddie: Josh Peck

Lone Gunslinging Vulture: Will Arnett

Fast Tony: Jay Leno

MPAA rating PG

Running time -- 91 minutes

Adventures of Pluto Nash

The drawing power of Eddie Murphy is bound to be severely tested by this wildly unfunny sci-fi/action comedy, unveiled Friday without press screenings. Playing a nightclub owner on the moon, even Murphy's expert comic timing and famed charisma can't rescue this effort, which also boasts a talented cast of supporting players similarly lost in space. The inevitable boxoffice disaster is likely to result in yet another "Nutty Professor" or "Doctor Dolittle" to restore Murphy's luster.

Written by Neil Cuthbert, whose resume includes "Mystery Men" and "Hocus Pocus", the film is set on the moon in the year 2087. Pluto Nash is a smuggler-turned-nightclub owner thanks to the ill fortune of his best friend, Tony Jay Mohr). One day, Pluto is approached by a pair of hired thugs working for a mysterious gangster named Rex Crater who wants to take over his operation. When Pluto refuses to sell, he finds himself fighting for his life, aided by his beautiful new waitress Dina (Rosario Dawson) and Bruno (Randy Quaid), his bald-headed robot bodyguard nearing obsolescence.

The plot's confusing twists and turns suggest some severe editing-room cutting, as do the abbreviated appearances by a slew of talented performers, including Joe Pantoliano as the aforementioned thug, Luis Guzman as a Pluto Nash fan and victim of robot abuse who helps him out of a jam, Peter Boyle as a retired cop and Pluto's confidant, Illeana Douglas as a specialist in "body alteration" and Burt Young as a loan shark. Far more egregious are the complete wastes of Pam Grier, who plays Pluto's mother and is not even allowed to kick any butt, and John Cleese, almost literally phoning it in as the officious automated driver (seen on a video screen) of a stolen car.

Making an unbilled cameo is Alec Baldwin as a Gotti-like mobster.

The space angle, which is ostensibly what makes the picture distinctive, results in such tired satirical bits as signs advertising Trump buildings and paper money featuring the visage of Hillary Clinton (those are the jokes, folks). Murphy finds himself in the uncharacteristic position of mainly playing straight man, to little comedic effect. If he had been allowed to improvise or riff more often, some fun might have resulted, but he mostly seems hemmed in. Scoring the few laughs in the picture are Quaid as the ultra-stiff robot and Mohr as a space-age lounge singer.

Tech credits are adequate, with elaborate sets built in Montreal providing some imaginative futuristic touches. The clever soundtrack features hip-hop versions of such songs as "Blue Moon" and "Dancin' in the Moonlight".

THE ADVENTURES OF PLUTO NASH

Warner Bros. Pictures

A Castle Rock Entertainment presentation, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures and NPV Entertainment

A Bregman production

Credits:

Director: Ron Underwood

Screenwriter: Neil Cuthbert

Producers: Martin Bregman, Michael Bregman, Louis A. Stroller

Executive producer: Bruce Berman

Director of photography: Oliver Wood

Production designer: Bill Brzeski

Editors: Paul Hirsch, Alan Heim

Music: John Powell

Cast:

Pluto Nash: Eddie Murphy

Bruno: Randy Quaid

Dina Lake: Rosario Dawson

Mogan: Joe Pantoliano

Tony Francis: Jay Mohr

Felix Laranga: Luis Guzman

Belcher: James Rebhorn

Rowland: Peter Boyle

Gino: Burt Young

Miguel: Miguel A. Nunez Jr

Flura Nash: Pam Grier

James: John Cleese

Running time -- 91 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

See also

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