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‘Call Me by Your Name’: Read the First Chapter of Andre Aciman’s Book Before Seeing the Movie

‘Call Me by Your Name’: Read the First Chapter of Andre Aciman’s Book Before Seeing the Movie
Editor’s note: The following is an exclusive excerpt from the first chapter of Andre Aciman’s novel “Call Me by Your Name,” adapted by James Ivory for the screen for Luca Guadagnino’s lauded film starring Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer.

“Later!” The word, the voice, the attitude.

I’d never heard anyone use “later” to say goodbye before. It sounded harsh, curt, and dismissive, spoken with the veiled in- difference of people who may not care to see or hear from you again.

It is the first thing I remember about him, and I can hear it still today. Later!

I shut my eyes, say the word, and I’m back in Italy, so many years ago, walking down the tree-lined driveway, watching him step out of the cab, billowy blue shirt, wide-open collar, sunglasses, straw hat, skin everywhere. Suddenly he’s shaking my hand, handing me his backpack,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Call Me by Your Name’: Timothée Chalamet is Learning How to Be a Man, Onscreen and Off

  • Indiewire
‘Call Me by Your Name’: Timothée Chalamet is Learning How to Be a Man, Onscreen and Off
When “Call Me by Your Name” screened at the New York Film Festival last month, several threads from Timothée Chalamet’s 21-year-old life wove together. Above the sold-out, 1,100-seat audience at Alice Tully Hall, he watched the second half from the balcony, seated next to the actor who plays his lover, Armie Hammer, and their director, Luca Guadagnino. Onscreen, Chalamet’s character was 17, the same age he was when Guadagnino met him. At that time, Chalamet was a student at Fiorello H. Laguardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts — the Upper West Side inspiration for “Fame” — across the street.

Read More: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Review: Luca Guadagnino Delivers A Queer Masterpiece — Sundance 2017

In kindergarten, Chalamet was a lukewarm commercial actor. His “first moment of passion” for the craft came at age 12, seeing Heath Ledger’s Joker in “The Dark Knight.” “I just had no clue what
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Michael Haneke, German Cinema, Rialto Pictures, and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

A Michael Haneke retrospective begins as does a restoration of The Crime of Monsieur Lange.

The Film Society Lincoln Center

“The Lost Years of German Cinema” features rare cinematic gems from Fritz Lang, Helmut Käutner, Robert Siodmak, and more.

Anthology Film Archives

“Generation Wealth” kicks off with The Bling Ring, Spring Breakers, L’Argent,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Coming-of-Age Dramas Make Mad Dash for Awards Season Glory

Coming-of-Age Dramas Make Mad Dash for Awards Season Glory
The coming-of-age genre is nothing new to Oscar season. From recent best picture nominees “Juno” and “An Education” to classics such as “Dead Poets Society” or “American Graffiti,” the universal truths discovered in those years between teenager and young adult have enthralled audiences and Academy members for most of its history. This year has brought a number of acclaimed new entries into the coming of age pantheon, including Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird” and Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name.”

Set in Sacramento in 2002, “Lady Bird” follows the title character (Saoirse Ronan) though her senior year of high school as she navigates young love and a desire to attend college in New York City, a proposition her mother (Laurie Metcalf) doesn’t see as a realistic goal.

“Someone’s coming of age is someone else’s letting go and I always wanted the movie to be just as focused on the letting go,” Gerwig says. “Because
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Call Me By Your Name Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Call Me By Your Name Movie Review
Title: Call Me by Your Name Director: Luca Guadagnino Script: James Ivory Cast: Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, Esther Garrel, Victoire Du Bois, Vanda Capriolo, Antonio Rimoldi, Elena Bucci, Marco Sgrosso, André Aciman, Peter Spears. Italian director, Luca Guadagnino returns to the big screen with a profound coming-of-age story. It is the […]

The post Call Me By Your Name Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Sliff 2017 – “And The Winners Are….”

The Urban Chestnut Beer poured freely (because it was free) at the Urban Chestnut Microbrewery in the Grove neighborhood inSt. Louis last night. It was the closing-night party for the 26th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival where the slate of audience-choice and juried-competition winners were announced to an attentive crowd. Sliff presented four major filmmaking awards during the course of the 2017 festival: Charles Guggenheim Cinema St. Louis Award to Dan Mirvish; Women in Film Award to Pam Grier; Lifetime Achievement Awards to Sam Pollard; and the Contemporary Cinema Award to Marco Williams.

Tribeca Film Institute’s If/Then Short Documentary Pitch Competition

Tribeca Film Institute, in partnership with Sliff, sought short documentary projects by filmmakers living and working in the Midwest for its new If/Then Short Documentary Program, made possible with support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Five projects were invited to enter
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Howards End’ Trailer: Kenneth Lonergan Follows ‘Manchester by the Sea’ With a New Take on the Celebrated Novel — Watch

‘Howards End’ Trailer: Kenneth Lonergan Follows ‘Manchester by the Sea’ With a New Take on the Celebrated Novel — Watch
BBC has released a new trailer for “Howards End,” an upcoming miniseries adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel that was previously made into a Merchant-Ivory film. Kenneth Lonergan wrote this new take on the book, which stars Hayley Atwell. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Howards End’ Photos: Kenneth Lonergan and Hayley Atwell Bring the Classic Novel to Television

Here’s the synopsis, which is appropriately wordy: “Margaret Schlegel (Atwell) is an intelligent, idealistic young woman who is courted by the older Henry Wilcox (Matthew Macfadyen), a self-made conservative businessman, after his wife Ruth Wilcox (Julia Ormond) dies unexpectedly and he becomes owner of Howards End.

“Meanwhile Margaret’s passionate and capricious younger sister Helen Schlegel (Philippa Coulthard) takes up the cause of Leonard Bast (Joseph Quinn) a young bank clerk who falls on hard times at work and at home with his partner Jacky (Rosalind Eleazar). In the absence of their late parents,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Howards End’ Trailer: Kenneth Lonergan Follows ‘Manchester by the Sea’ With a New Take on the Celebrated Novel — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Howards End’ Trailer: Kenneth Lonergan Follows ‘Manchester by the Sea’ With a New Take on the Celebrated Novel — Watch
BBC has released a new trailer for “Howards End,” an upcoming miniseries adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel that was previously made into a Merchant-Ivory film. Kenneth Lonergan wrote this new take on the book, which stars Hayley Atwell. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Howards End’ Photos: Kenneth Lonergan and Hayley Atwell Bring the Classic Novel to Television

Here’s the synopsis, which is appropriately wordy: “Margaret Schlegel (Atwell) is an intelligent, idealistic young woman who is courted by the older Henry Wilcox (Matthew Macfadyen), a self-made conservative businessman, after his wife Ruth Wilcox (Julia Ormond) dies unexpectedly and he becomes owner of Howards End.

“Meanwhile Margaret’s passionate and capricious younger sister Helen Schlegel (Philippa Coulthard) takes up the cause of Leonard Bast (Joseph Quinn) a young bank clerk who falls on hard times at work and at home with his partner Jacky (Rosalind Eleazar). In the absence of their late parents,
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Ichi the Killer,’ ‘The Gold Rush,’ Spike Lee, Mario Bava & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Garrel, Miike (x4), Marker, Roeg, Fuller, Lubitsch, and Maigret.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Classics from the likes of Chaplin and Miyazaki play alongside newcomers in “My First Film Fest 2.”

Museum of the Moving Image

The Stephen Cone retrospective wraps up.

Anthology Film Archives

Adaptations of Stanisław Lem and the Strugatsky Brothers are underway.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Special Review: Shakespeare Wallah

  • Bollyspice
Shashi Kapoor as “Sanju” (left) and Felicity Kendal as “Lizzie Buckingham” (right) in Shakespeare Wallah

directed by James Ivory Courtesy of the Cohen Film Collection

One evening in India, a troupe of travelling players, the Buckingham Company, finds themselves stranded after one of their vehicles breaks down. They are eventually rescued by Sanju (Shashi Kapoor), who is immediately smitten with Lizzie Buckingham (Felicity Kendal) the actress daughter of the troupe’s owners, Tony (Geoffrey Kendal) and Carla (Laura Liddel).

It’s easy to see why Sanju would be drawn to Lizzie – apart from what she represents (as white, as English) – Felicity Kendal, in her first film role, is luminous and lovely, her acting breathtaking in moments – her freshness as an actor often stands in contrast to the staid, traditional performances of her parents.

The Buckinghams and their rag-tag group of players travel India performing the works of Shakespeare, as they have done for many years,
See full article at Bollyspice »

‘Call Me by Your Name’: A Global Effort to Create a Simple, Well-Told Tale

‘Call Me by Your Name’: A Global Effort to Create a Simple, Well-Told Tale
It takes a lot of work to make something simple. Exhibit A: “Call Me by Your Name,” the coming-of-age first romance of a 17-year-old American in 1983 Italy. “We had a little movie about the simplest story, yet it took a global effort of 10 years to get it across the finish line,” says producer Peter Spears.

He and fellow producer Howard Rosenman read the Andre Aciman novel in 2007 and quickly optioned it. The story centers on the romance of Elio and the 24-year-old Oliver, who’s working as his father’s assistant for a few months.

There were challenges even from the start. “Potential financiers didn’t understand the movie,” Spears says. Some worried “Nothing bad happens.” Spears would tell them, “That’s kind of the point.” He adds, “They would ask ‘Could we make the mother evil?’ or suggest, ‘The stakes need to be higher.’ I always said, ‘It’s about the human heart, how much higher
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Shakespeare Wallah’ Restoration: Merchant Ivory Classic Gets Bollywood-Infused New Poster

  • Indiewire
‘Shakespeare Wallah’ Restoration: Merchant Ivory Classic Gets Bollywood-Infused New Poster
The latest Merchant Ivory film to get the full restoration treatment from Charles S. Cohen and his Cohen Media Group is the sumptuous 1965 drama “Shakespeare Wallah,” combining the legendary production duo’s love of family drama, canny political commentary, and a hearty dose of literally Shakespearean entanglements. It’s just one of the 30 films being re-released by Cohen as part of a remastered library includes 21 feature films and 9 shorts and documentaries.

Merchant Ivory Productions was founded in 1961 by producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory — together, they produced 44 films. Founder and Oscar-nominated director Ivory has collaborated with Cohen, and serves as creative director, on the restoration, re-release, and promotion of each of the 30 films. Other recent titles of note include “Howards End” and “Maurice,” with plenty more to come.

Read More:Merchant Ivory Films’ Sumptuous Re-Release Gets A Star-Filled New Trailer — Watch

This new “Shakespeare Wallah” restoration came from the 35Mm
See full article at Indiewire »

September/October. It's a Wrap

Since the bulk of September and October are given over to festival life each year (here's all that business wrapped up for you) there's less time for randomness which is in some ways our favorite thing about blogging about the cinema. But since we haven't done an Icymi best of since August, here are 16 things you might have missed that you should check out:

This is Halloween Salim's cinematic evocation of the season The Furniture: The Beguiled Daniel gazes into the plaster haze Elizabeth Debicki as Virginia Woolf Murtada takes a first look Martyr Mothers of Aronofsky Jorge wonders if the director has mommy issues? Two for the Road (1967) Tim's fiftieth anniversary revisit Podcast 9.9 Battle of the Sexes, Beach Rats and mother! discussed Academy Expels Weinstein Nathaniel sees the end of an era Smackdown 85 The Color Purple, Agnes of God, and more 5 Takeaways from the Success of It Spencer lists
See full article at FilmExperience »

Tiff & Nyff & Middleburg Wrap-Ups

Another autumn whizzes by and with it a look back on the festivals we've covered. Here's everything we reviewed from Tiff and Nyff and Middleburg this year in case you missed it. Reviews from Jason Adams, Manuel Betancourt, Nick Davis, Sean Donovan, Murtada Elfaldl, John Guerin, Chris Feil, and Nathaniel R

Tiff 2017

the films

The Breadwinner • Darkest Hour

Death of Stalin • Disaster • Downsizing •

Euphoria • Film Stars Dont Die in Liverpool •

First They Killed My Father •

The Florida Project • Happy End • I, Tonya •

The Killing of a Sacred Deer • Kings •

Lady Bird • Lodgers • Mademoiselle Paradis

Mary Shelley • mother! •

Never Steady Never Still • On Body and Soul •

The Racer and the Jailbird • Revenge •

The Seen and Unseen • The Shape of Water

Sheikh Jackson • Thelma •

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri •

Tigre • Western • The Wife • Zama

parties, events, randomness

greatest party photo ever • "I'm Armie" •

Helena Bonham-Carter • mother! moods •

portraits from the fest • Podcast
See full article at FilmExperience »

Middleburg Farewell: Nicholas Brittel, Greta Gerwig, and "American Crime Story"

Day 1 (Darkest Hour), Day 2 (James Ivory, Mudbound, A Fantastic Woman) in case you missed them, Day 3 (Last Flag Flying)

Ann Hornaday and Greta Gerwig talk after a screening of Lady Bird. photo src

The last moments of Middleburg were a blissful blur that it's taken me a week to recover from. Before I left the splendor of the country at this under-the-radar festival in Virginia, I managed to attend three more events.

Lady Bird

I caught some of Lady Bird again (one viewing is definitely not enough). Just enough to give me that rush of pre-college feels again before meeting one-on-one with Greta Gerwig. We'll share that interview next week as Lady Bird begins its theatrical release. Gerwig is such a singular actress that we don't want her to give that up (please never leave our screens!) but it's a joy to know that she writes and directs just as beautifully.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Call Me By Your Name review

Call Me By Your Name, featuring Armie Hammer, is a cinematic treat. Here's our review...

In its purest form cinema captures the broad spectrum of intoxicating emotions that tend to define our lives. Unravelling the excruciatingly raw yet celestial nature of first love, Luca Guadagnino’s (A Bigger Splash) exquisite new film Call Me By Your Name will thus strike a chord with many.

Basking in the endless sunshine of northern Italy, precocious 17-year-old Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) spends the balmy summer days leisurely transcribing classical sheet music and devouring copious amounts of paperback books. His world is drastically turned upside down upon the arrival of Oliver (Armie Hammer), a handsomely suave and emphatically confident post-grad American student who has been flown out to intern for Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specialising in Greco-Roman antiquity.

What you then get it a sun drenched coming of age love story that's achingly passionate.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Call Me By Your Name review – a peach of a romance

Timothée Chalamet is superb in a sensuous gay love story set in Lombardy

There is a moment just before a teenage crush bursts its dam and becomes a fully fledged first love. It’s a moment in which time is briefly suspended; it’s that shiver of uncertainty before you dive over the edge of the waterfall into the kind of love you could drown in. It’s this – the exquisite torture of not knowing if feelings are reciprocated followed by the helpless flood of emotions – that is captured so intensely and urgently in this gorgeous work of yearning. Director Luca Guadagnino has a gift for romance.

This adaptation of the novel of the same name by André Aciman, penned by James Ivory, forms the concluding part of Guadagnino’s Desire trilogy, following I Am Love (2009) and A Bigger Splash (2015). Of the two, the new film has far more in common with the lush,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Middleburg Finale Pt 1: "Last Flag Flying"

Day 1 (Darkest Hour) and Day 2 (James Ivory, Mudbound, A Fantastic Woman) in case you missed them.

Saturday at Middleburg started really slow but then the tempo and key changed. And then it got chopped and screwed and tessellated... and became truly special. If you don't know what any of that means, it's okay; neither did I. I shall explain when we come to the topic of Oscar nominated film composer Nicholas Britell of Moonlight fame.

But first Last Flag Flying...

Richard Linklater is America's most distinguished auteur in the subgenre of movies in which a tight knit group of men just kind of hang out for two hours. He's back quickly after his delightful college baseball comedy Everybody Wants Some!! but this time he's trained his lens on three men his own age... 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Call Me By Your Name review – gorgeous gay love story seduces and overwhelms

Set during an endless Italian summer, this ravishing drama starring Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet is imbued with a sophisticated sensuality

The debt to pleasure is deferred in exquisite style for this ravishingly beautiful movie set in Northern Italy in the early 80s: a coming-of-age love story between a precocious teenage boy and a slightly older man. Their summer romance is saturated with poetic languor and a deeply sophisticated sensuality.

The film is directed by Luca Guadagnino (who made I Am Love and A Bigger Splash) and adapted from the novel by André Aciman by James Ivory, who had originally been slated to co-direct and has a producer credit. Ivory’s presence inevitably calls to mind his film version of Em Forster’s Maurice, to which this is frankly superior. For me, it brought back Alan Hollinghurst novels such as The Folding Star and The Spell. Call Me By Your Name
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The 1965 Shashi Kapoor starrer Shakespeare Wallah is getting a 4K Restoration Rerelease this November

  • Bollyspice
Starring Shashi Kapoor, Madhur Jaffrey, and Felicity Kendal, with original music by Satyajit Ray, Merchant Ivory’s 1965 Shakespeare Wallah will be rereleased in an incredible 4K restoration in New York at Quad Cinemas on November 10th.

Cohen Media Group has announced the brand new 4K scan and restoration from the original camera negative and magnetic soundtrack, and featuring a new 5.1 audio mix from the stereo 35mm mags, all approved by director James Ivory.

The incredible Shakespeare Wallah was the feature film that really put Merchant Ivory Productions on the international movie map, winning them great critical acclaim and now recognized as a classic. Starring Shashi Kapoor, Madhur Jaffrey, and a young Felicity Kendal, the film’s inspiration lies in the real-life adventures of Ms. Kendal’s family as a traveling theater group in India during the final days of English colonial rule. The ‘Buckingham Players’ try to uphold British tradition
See full article at Bollyspice »
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