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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1992

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Bruce Lansbury, TV Producer and Brother of Angela Lansbury, Dies at 87

15 February 2017 2:35 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Bruce Lansbury, the veteran TV producer and writer known for his work on The Wild Wild West, Wonder Woman and Murder, She Wrote, which starred his older sister, Angela Lansbury, has died. He was 87.

The London-born Lansbury died Monday in La Quinta, Calif., after a battle with Alzheimer’s disease, his daughter, Felicia Lansbury Meyer, told The Hollywood Reporter.

His survivors also include his twin brother, Edgar Lansbury; he produced the popular 1970s Broadway revival of Gypsy that starred their sister and worked on films including The Wild Party (1975), directed by James Ivory.

Lansbury also served as vp creative affairs »

- Mike Barnes

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Berlinale: Luca Guadagnino on Why ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Strikes Such Deep Chords

13 February 2017 11:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After becoming a standout title at Sundance, Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name” had its European premiere at the Berlin Film Festival on Monday, where it was also very warmly received. The film features Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, and was shot and edited in a matter of months. Guadagnino spoke to Variety about how the stars aligned for this powerful summer love story to become a potential career game-changer for him.

You really hit your stride with this movie, which seems like your most personal work. Is it?

I’m not so sure about that. I would say the reason this film is striking deep chords is probably due to the way I approached it. It was a way of absolute simplicity. I asked myself if I wanted to create a piece that was a sort of conversation between the storyline, the characters, and the medium, or »

- Nick Vivarelli

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Berlinale: ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Was a ‘Universal Effort’

13 February 2017 9:57 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Call Me by Your Name,” Luca Guadagnino’s coming of age drama that wowed audiences at Sundance, won wide praise from Berlinale journos and film critics following its Panorama Special screening on Monday at the Berlin Film Festival.

Based on the novel by André Aciman, the story chronicles the love affair between Italian-American Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and his father’s new American assistant, Oliver, played by Armie Hammer.

Speaking at a press conference, Guadagnino described the work as a “film for families. I like to think it’s a film for the transmission of knowledge and hope that people of different generations comet to see the film together.”

Hammer, who also stars in Stanley Tucci’s Berlinale competition entry “Final Portrait,” said he could “certainly relate to how Luca was able to execute human desire, craving – this very  human emotion, between these two characters. These are primal emotions of desire that people feel. »

- Ed Meza

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Watch: Luca Guadagnino, Armie Hammer and More Discuss ‘Call Me By Your Name’ at Live Berlinale Press Conference

13 February 2017 5:45 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Starting today at 8:50Am Et/5:50Am Pt, you can watch a live stream of the Berlinale press conference featuring the cast and crew of “Call Me By Your Name.” Filmmaker Luca Guadagnino is expected to attend the conference, as well as cast members including Armie HammerTimothée Chalamet and Michael Stuhlbarg.

The film recently bowed at Sundance to overwhelming acclaim, and Sony Pictures Classics will release it later this fall.

Read More: Paul Verhoeven to Serve as Berlin Film Festival Jury President

Per the film’s official synopsis, “It’s the hot, sun-drenched summer of 1983 and Elio is at his parents’ country seat in northern Italy. The 17-year-old idles away the time listening to music, reading books and swimming until one day his father’s new American assistant arrives at their large villa. Oliver is charming and, like Elio, has Jewish roots; he is also young, self-confident and good-looking. »

- Kate Erbland

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Celluloid Dreams scores pre-sales on Guy Pearce, Toni Collette romantic thriller

10 February 2017 10:01 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Ensemble romantic thriller Andorra, also featuring Gillian Anderson secures German distribution.

Celluloid Dreams have unveiled a first round of pre-sales on Fred Schepisi’s romantic thriller Andorra which is due to start shooting in April.

It has been acquired for Austrian and Germany (Weltkino), Switzerland (Praesens-Film), Italy (01 Distribution) and Greece (Seven Films) and ex-Yugoslavia (Discovery) in Europe.

In Asia, Los Angeles-based DDDream has acquired for China and Chennai-based entertainment company Viswas bought rights for Singapore, Malaysia and India.

It has also sold to Australia (Madman Entertainment) the Middle East (Prime), Israel (Shoval Communication), the whole of Latin America (Impacto) and Airlines (CineSky Pictures).

Adapted from a novel by Peter Cameron, Andorra stars Pearce as Alexander Fox, a bookseller who leaves the Us to begin a new life abroad in small, idyllic Andorra.

Alexander’s attempts to reinvent himself take an unexpected turn after a woman’s body is found and he is a prime suspect.

The »

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‘Call Me By Your Name’ Clip: Armie Hammer Receives a Warm Welcome From Timothée Chalamet in Luca Guadagnino’s Drama

10 February 2017 10:32 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After receiving critical acclaim at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, Luca Guadagnino’s Italian masterpiece, “Call Me by Your Name,” will screen at Berlinale. Based on André Aciman’s beloved 2007 novel of the same name, the drama chronicles a romance between a 17-year old boy and a handsome American intern who is staying at his parents’ cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera.

In a new clip shared by Berlinale’s website, audiences witness the young man, Elio’s (Timothée Chalamet), first interaction with Oliver (Armie Hammer). Oliver is seen arriving to the Perlman estate and greeted by Mr. Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and his wife. Elio is then called down and takes Oliver’s bags to his room.

In the beginning Elio is somewhat distant towards Oliver until then the two begin to spend more time together. Per the website’s film description, “Elio begins to make tentative overtures towards »

- Liz Calvario

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Watch: Timothée Chalamet Meets Armie Hammer in New Clip from ‘Call Me By Your Name’

10 February 2017 8:11 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Now aiming for a fall release, there’s still a long wait until audiences will be able to see Luca Guadagnino‘s follow-up to A Bigger Splash, Call Me By Your Name, but for those that want a preview, a new clip has arrived today. An adaptation of André Aciman‘s novel, scripted by James Ivory and the director, it follows a 17-year-old boy (Timothée Chalamet) who begins a romance with the house guest (Armie Hammer) of his professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg). This new clip features the first meeting between to the soon-to-be lovers.

“I knew that Sundance was a warm environment for this movie because when we showed I Am Love, I felt the Sundance audience was unbiased, uncynical and very open,” the director tells THR, answering the question as to why the film didn’t wait for Cannes. “We only submitted to Sundance and Berlin; I never thought »

- Jordan Raup

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Berlin: Sellers Hit the Festival and Market With Mixed Expectations

3 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sellers are heading to Berlin with realistic expectations about the state of the marketplace and the hurdles facing them.

“Consistently delivering great movies has always been the challenge, but you need the rigor required for that even more so now,” says Sierra/Affinity CEO Nick Meyer, who’ll be repping the Wwi-era drama “The Promise,” starring Oscar Isaac and Christian Bale, in Berlin. “The demand for excellence in filmmaking from independent distributors around the world is higher than ever.”

While Meyer is pragmatic about the global economy (“There are always going to be currency fluctuations and markets that are up and down — that’s the rule,” he says), others see a more ominous landscape.

“The fundamental issue right now is that every single territory in the world has problems that are very challenging, not just for the cinema market, but politically and economically,” says FilmNation Entertainment senior VP of international sales Tara Erer, »

- Gregg Goldstein

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Sundance 2017 Review: Call Me By Your Name Feels Both Fresh and Vintage

2 February 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

The word “sumptuous” doesn’t get bandied about very much during Sundance when describing films. In the land of ice and snow, things are either “quirky”, “dramadies” or “depressing as shit”, but they’re seldom languid, or bucolic. Perhaps that’s what elevated Call Me By Your Name this festival, feeling very much apart in time, place and tone from what was occurring in the world, a thematic departure from the politics of the day and the cinema of the festival. In fact, this is the most Cannes-like fable I’ve seen in Park City, its sun-dappled look and gentle touch the kind of thing lapped up on the southern coast of France. With a story written by James Ivory that’s part libidinous, part philosophical rumination, it’s practically begging...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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‘Call Me By Your Name’ Clip: Armie Hammer Makes Timothée Chalamet Squirm in Luca Guadagnino’s Sundance Sensation

30 January 2017 2:11 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Luca Guadagnino’s lush Italian romance premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to rave reviews, including from IndieWire’s David Ehrlich, who wrote of the director’s work: “[Guadagnino] stays attuned to the raw energy of trying to feel someone out without touching them, of what it’s like to live through that one magical summer where the weather is the only part of your world that doesn’t change every day.”

Read More: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ Review: Luca Guadagnino Delivers A Queer Masterpiece — Sundance 2017

Based on the 2007 novel of the same name by André Aciman, “Call Me By Your Name” is an elegant and restrained romance between Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the 17-year-old son of an academic, and Oliver (Armie Hammer), the handsome American intern who has come to stay the summer in the Northern Italian villa Elio’s family owns.

Of the film’s influences, Ehrlich writes: “While »

- Jude Dry

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Sundance 2017 Breakouts: Here Are The Movies You Can Expect To See In Next Year’s Oscar Race

30 January 2017 11:54 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On January 24, halfway through the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Sundance received its annual reconfirmation of its long-legged success: The Oscar nominations. This year it’s Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” and documentaries “Life, Animated” and “Oj: Made in America.” (Another five docs were shortlisted.)

Among its many other achievements, Sundance breaks out new talent. Agents, casting directors, producers, and filmmakers trawl screening rooms, looking for their next find. They network and party and pass buzz as they go, even when they must plow through blizzards to do it.

Here’s a look at what we might be celebrating this time next year. But remember, it’s a long long way from January to January.

Call Me By Your Name

The most obvious Oscar movie stood out from a sea of aspiring American indies, which is likely what Sony Pictures Classics had in mind when they scooped up the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Watch: Armie Hammer Gives a Massage in First Clip from ‘Call Me By Your Name’

30 January 2017 11:29 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It’s been exactly a week since I saw Luca Guadagnino‘s follow-up to A Bigger Splash, Call Me By Your Name, and I’m still basking in the romantic drama’s afterglow. An adaptation of André Aciman‘s novel, scripted by James Ivory and the director, it follows a 17-year-old boy (Timothée Chalamet) who begins a romance with the house guest (Armie Hammer) of his professor father (Michael Stuhlbarg). The first clip has now arrived, and depicts an early scene featuring the first physical touch between our leads.

I said in my review, “‘I have loved you for the last time,’ Sufjan Stevens sings in his original song ‘Visions of Gideon’ in Call Me By Your Name. It’s a moment of both bittersweet happiness and a farewell to a passion that won’t be replicated again for Elio (Timothée Chalamet) as, deep down, he knows his relationship with »

- Jordan Raup

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Sundance: The 10 Very Best Films from the 2017 Film Festival

30 January 2017 9:00 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

The Sundance Film Festival is officially over and the awards have already been handed out, both the official ones and our own Unconventional Awards, and out of the roughly thirty films I saw during my time in Park City, Utah, I’ve put together a list of the ten very best movies I had a chance to see. Many of them will be coming to theaters across the country later in the year, and a few of them may even be in the Oscar conversation a year from now.

10. The Big Sick

Silicon Valley’s Kumail Nanjiani made his triumphant debut as a leading man with this movie produced by Judd Apatow, directed by Michael Showalter (Hello, My Name is Doris) and co-written with wife Emily V. Gordon. Based on their own experiences in courting and how Emily (played by Zoe Kazan) being put into a medically-induced coma affected it, »

- Edward Douglas

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Sundance 2017. Correspondences #4

26 January 2017 11:17 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Call Me By Your Name Dear Josh,You asked me whether I’ve found my one film yet, the one that makes the festival experience worth remembering. And I’m pleased to report that with Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me By Your Name, I finally have. In fact, I was so taken with the film that I’ll dispense with the throat-clearing and get right to it.  Set in an expansive villa “somewhere in Northern Italy” in the summer of 1983, the film centers on Elio (Timothée Chalamet), an Italian-American Jewish teenager, who spends his days swimming by the river, going out with friends, transcribing music and just “waiting for the summer to end.” It opens with the arrival of Oliver (Armie Hammer), a Jewish-American academic who's come to help Elio's father (Michael Stuhlbarg) with his research. His arrival is a disruption; it shakes Elio in ways that he probably never anticipated. »

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Armie Hammer’s ‘Call Me by Your Name’ Joins Berlinale’s Panorama Lineup

25 January 2017 5:45 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Berlin Film Festival’s Panorama section has completed its lineup with the addition of 24 feature films, including “Call Me by Your Name,” an extremely well-reviewed gay love story featuring actor Armie Hammer.

The full Panorama program includes 36 world, six international and nine European premieres. Thirteen European films have been added. Among those is “Call Me by Your Name,” directed by Luca Guadagnino (“A Bigger Splash”) from an adaptation, co-written with James Ivory, of a novel by André Aciman.

There are five films from Brazil, including “Como Nossos Pais” (Just Like Our Parents), directed by Lais Bodanzky, who depicts the everyday lives of three generations in Sao Paulo as “a pyrotechnic display of individual passions and existential delusions staged with a sublime naturalness,” according to the festival.

Also in the program are Spanish debut feature “Pieles” (Skins) by Eduardo Casanova, “Rekvijem za gospodju J.” (Requiem for Mrs. J.) by Serbia’s Bojan Vuletić, »

- Leo Barraclough

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Sundance Review: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ is an Intoxicatingly Sexy and Disarmingly Nice Romance

24 January 2017 7:02 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“I have loved you for the last time,” Sufjan Stevens sings in his original song “Visions of Gideon” in Call Me By Your Name. It’s a moment of both bittersweet happiness and a farewell to a passion that won’t be replicated again for Elio (Timothée Chalamet) as, deep down, he knows his relationship with Olivier (Armie Hammer) is over after his six-week stay in their Italian villa. Luca Guadagnino’s disarmingly nice and intoxicatingly sexy film is an extraordinary queer romance, one that evocatively explores the body and mind’s surrender to lust and love.

Set in a sun-drenched northern Italy town in 1983, the 17-year-old Elio fills up his free summer hours reading, transcribing music, occasionally going out with nearby friends, and not much else. When Olivier, an chiseled older student from Rhode Island in the process of getting his doctorate, shows up to work with Elio’s »

- Jordan Raup

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‘Call Me By Your Name’ Review: Luca Guadagnino Delivers A Queer Masterpiece — Sundance 2017

23 January 2017 12:15 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Is it better to speak or to die?” That’s the core question of “Call Me By Your Name,” which surfaces in a scene where a character reads the words of Marguerite of Navarre in “The Heptaméron,” but it’s an idea at the heart of all queer narratives. It’s been especially present in queer cinema, where muteness and survival are often the most bittersweet bedfellows. But “Call Me By Your Name” not only quotes Marguerite’s words, it suffuses them into every fiber of its being. It’s a great film because of how lucidly it poses her question, and an essential one because of how courageously it answers it.

Directed by Luca Guadagnino with all of his usual cool (“I Am Love”) and adapted from André Aciman’s beloved 2007 novel of the same name, the rapturous “Call Me By Your Name” nearly rates alongside recent Lgbt phenomenons “Carol” and “Moonlight, »

- David Ehrlich

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Call Me by Your Name’

23 January 2017 12:15 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As numerous are the ways in which Luca Guadagnino’s latest (and most personal) film, “Call Me by Your Name,” advances the canon of gay cinema, none impresses more than the fact that it’s not necessarily a gay movie at all. Rather, the “I Am Love” director’s ravishingly sensual new film — adapted from André Aciman’s equally vivid, 1983-set coming-out/coming-of-age novel — is above all a story of first love, one that transcends the same-sex dynamic of its central couple, much as “Moonlight” so recently did.

Acquired by Sony Pictures Classics shortly before its Sundance premiere, this Proustian account of an Italo-American 17-year-old’s transformative summer may not be as commercial as that film, but it ought to be a word-of-mouth art-house hit all the same — especially when talk turns to what teenage Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet) and American summer guest Oliver (Armie Hammer) do with a ripe peach. »

- Peter Debruge

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Lrm's 10 Most Anticipated Sundance Film Festival Premieres

17 January 2017 10:15 AM, PST | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Later this week, Lrm will be attending this year’s Sundance Film Festival. While the festival tends to be a mixed bag of indie films, some will be picked up for distribution by studios and turned into mainstream hits, others will flounder and be lucky to get a VOD release. Even so, there’s no denying that Sundance is the real beginning of the year for most movie lovers as we’ll be talking about the movies below for the next 12 months.

Last year alone, Sundance held the premieres for The Birth of a Nation, Manchester by the Sea, Captain Fantastic, Love and Friendship, The Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Sing Street and many more films, some that appeared on The Weekend Warrior’s year-end Top 25. One or two of those might even receive Oscar nominations when they’re announced next week on January 24.

Most of the films I’ve selected »

- Edward Douglas

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000 | 1992

1-20 of 26 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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