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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 1998 | 1996

3 items from 2017


Trey Edward Shults interview: It Comes At Night, Jeff Nichols, movie marketing and more

6 July 2017 2:30 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Jul 7, 2017

Trey Edward Shults tells us about It Comes At Night, its dark history, and odd marketing...

In amongst the bustle of Spider-Man: Homecoming and Despicable Me 3 screenings in

UK

cinemas this weekend is the distinctly unsettling and powerful It Comes At Night. A film marketed, not entirely fairly, as a horror, it’s from writer/director Trey Edward Shults. He wrote the movie following the death of his father, a parent from whom he was estranged until his dying days. That extraordinary, impactful backdrop underpins the film, and was the logical starting point for our conversation.

I’ve been reading quite a lot since sitting through your film. In particular, that the movie was a response to your relationship with your late father. I’m sorry to bring it up, but it resonates through so much of the film once you know that. I read that »

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The Furniture: The Cluttered, Musty Madness of King George

5 June 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

by Daniel Walber 

Play adaptations are frequently criticized for not being “cinematic” enough. It’s as perennial a complaint as it is a silly one. Many of the best play adaptations don’t abandon their more theatrical elements, they use cinema’s unique capabilities as an especially potent additive. 

The Madness of King George is a great example, a film that juxtaposes the visual freedom of on-location shooting with the precision of period sets. Adapted by Alan Bennett from his own play and directed by Nicholas Hytner, it chronicles the Regency Crisis of 1788. King George III (Nigel Hawthorne), perhaps as a result of porphyria, lost his grip on reality. The Prince of Wales (Rupert Everett) petitioned Parliament to have his father removed from power, and to have himself declared regent. »

- Daniel Walber

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The myth of The Madness Of King George

20 May 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Jun 19, 2017

The Madness Of King George is a film that was sold off the back of a story that wasn’t true…

Nominated for four Oscars, and bringing the late, great Nigel Hawthorne to the attention of movie audiences (following his sensational work in television and on the stage), The Madness Of King George was a real breakout hit. Premiering in December 1994 (just two months after filming wrapped!), and released in the UK in March 1995, the film won one Academy Award, three BAFTAs, and grossed over $15m in the Us alone.

But there’s one story about the movie that continues to circle. And it’s to do with its title.

The film is based on Alan Bennett’s play, The Madness Of King George III, that tells the story of the health issues that King George III suffered during his reign in the 18th century. But when »

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3 items from 2017


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