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‘Doctor Who’: BritBox to Stream All 26 Seasons of the Classic Series

‘Doctor Who’: BritBox to Stream All 26 Seasons of the Classic Series
It’s a nice time to be an Anglophile with the March launch of BritBox. For $6.99 a month, users have been privy to upwards of 2,000 hours of British programming through the streaming service, created in collaboration with BBC Worldwide and the UK commercial broadcaster, ITV.

With a diverse collection that ranges from the classic Ricky Gervais comedy “The Office” and long-running British soap “Emmerdale,” there was still a Tardis-shaped hole in their programming. Lucky for loyal Whovians out there, one of the cornerstones of classic British television has come to BritBox. “Doctor Who” is coming to the platform with a full collection of Classic era episodes – that is, the episodes of “Doctor Who” which ran from 1963-1989.

Read More: The New ‘Doctor Who’: A Plea For Diversity, and 13 Dream Doctors

With an upcoming new companion and the end of an era for the Twelfth Doctor (Peter Capaldi), “Doctor Who
See full article at Indiewire »

Doctor Who: its villains' offscreen activities

Andrew Blair Sep 22, 2016

A salute to the unexplained story elements in Doctor Who, that leave us wondering who makes all the equipment for the Daleks?

Doctor Who raises many questions. What is the Doctor’s real name? What would he have said to Rose on that beach? And most important of all, who is it that designs hats for the Daleks?

Throughout the show’s history, right back to 1964’s The Dalek Invasion Of Earth, the Doctor’s greatest foe have demonstrated precisely cack-all aptitude for millinery. The Robomen in that story were humans converted into slaves and fitted with large helmet/neck-brace combos for mind-control purposes. By 1988’s Remembrance Of The Daleks they’d realised that putting a small chip behind Michael Sheard’s ear was much less conspicuous, but then in 2007’s Daleks In Manhattan/Evolution Of The Daleks they’ve decided hats aren’t enough and turn people into pig hybrids.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doomwatch: revisiting a UK 'sci-fact' classic

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Ground-breaking, intelligent, prescient 1970s drama Doomwatch, now out on DVD, is a British television classic...

Playing on the public's fear that 'this could actually happen', Doomwatch had a veneer of credibility unusual in the escapist television drama landscape of the late 60s/early 70s. This spring sees the most comprehensive haul of Doomwatch episodes released on DVD for the first time. The nickname for the "Department for the Observation and Measurement of Scientific Work", the series first appeared on BBC1 on Monday 9th February 1970 at 9.40pm. It followed half an hour of comedy from Kenneth Williams, which must have surely heightened its dramatic impact.

The series would run in tandem with the early Jon Pertwee era of Doctor Who; the first episode made its debut two days after part two of Doctor Who And The Silurians. The two shows undoubtedly shared a synergy of ideas - not to mention cast and crew.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Strax to team up with Jago and Litefoot in a special Doctor Who spin-off from Big Finish

Big Finish Productions has just announced a very interesting amalgamation that is bound to be rather brilliant. Strax, the Sontaran butler to Victorian investigator Vastra and her wife Jenny, will be swapping the Paternoster Gang for a short spell with Jago and Litefoot. This new release will be called Jago & Litefoot & Strax.

In Jago & Litefoot & Strax, the Sontaran suffers a disorienting attack, mistakes the two Victorian investigators for Jenny and Vastra. Together, they are on the trail of a creature that is stealing brains, which may or may not be linked to a haunted house in London.

The characters of Jago and Litefoot - played by Christopher Benjamin and Trevor Baxter – were created by Robert Holmes and first appeared opposite Tom Baker’s Fourth Doctor in The Talons of Weng Chiang in 1977. Over 30 years later they were reunited on audio by Big Finish, with a tenth series due for release
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

James Holmes’ Parents, Arlene And Robert Holmes, Watch Silently As Their Son Is Found Guilty Of Murder

James Holmes’ parents, Arlene and Robert Holmes, watched as their son was found guilty of murder in the Colorado movie theater massacre on Thursday. Arlene And Robert Holmes Believe Their Son Is Mentally Ill Holmes faced 165 separate charges with regards to the Colorado massacre, which occurred in 2012 when Holmes entered a movie theater […]

The post James Holmes’ Parents, Arlene And Robert Holmes, Watch Silently As Their Son Is Found Guilty Of Murder appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

15 greatest ever Doctor Who monsters ranked

Doctor Who has debuted its latest menacing monster - an armoured antagonist that looks something like a grasshopper crossed with a tank.

In over 50 years, the world's longest-running sci-fi series has introduced us to hundreds of weird and wonderful creatures - but which is the best?

After much debate, here's our definitive ranking of the most memorable and terrifying monsters from 1963 to 2015 (and we're not counting humanoid wrongdoers, so no Master!).

Read on, then join the debate in the comments below...

15. The Haemovores

1980s Doctor Who can sometimes come in for an unfair drubbing - but there was still plenty of imagination, wit and inventive horror on show when the show was at its best.

'The Curse of Fenric' - airing as part of the final 'classic' series in 1989 - is a strong case for the defence, introducing the vampiric Haemovores - a species of evolved humans who lurked eerily
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

The definitive ranking of the 15 best Doctor Who monsters ever

Doctor Who has debuted its latest menacing monster - an armoured antagonist that looks something like a grasshopper crossed with a tank.

In over 50 years, the world's longest-running sci-fi series has introduced us to hundreds of weird and wonderful creatures - but which is the best?

Here's our definitive ranking - from 1963 to 2015 - of the most memorable and terrifying monsters (and we're not counting humanoid wrongdoers, so no Master!).

15. The Haemovores

1980s Doctor Who can sometimes come in for an unfair drubbing - but there was still plenty of imagination, wit and inventive horror on show when the show was at its best.

'The Curse of Fenric' - airing as part of the final 'classic' series in 1989 - is a strong case for the defence, introducing the vampiric Haemovores - a species of evolved humans who lurked eerily under the sea and possessed razor-sharp claws and suckers for feeding.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

10 Doctor Who Actors Who Have Appeared In Blake’s 7

BBC

Despite the many fan attempts to fuse them together, Blake’s 7 and Doctor Who are set in two entirely different fictional universes. Behind the scenes, though, the two shows hold much in common.

As one might expect, they share writers such as Terry Nation, Robert Holmes and Chris Boucher, incidental music from Dudley Simpson and special effects genius Matt Irvine. Starting his career as a production assistant on Doctor Who, David Maloney went on to produce Blake’s 7 and direct episodes of both programmes.

At times even the props and scenery came in useful between shows. The eagle-eyed will spot Federation helmets in the Peter Davison story Frontios.

Famously Colin Baker, the Sixth Doctor, played the evil Bayban The Butcher in City at the Edge of the World but with Doctor Who running for so many years longer, and with such a massive range of spin off plays in its trail,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Doctor Who: Every Tom Baker/Hinchcliffe Era Story Ranked From Worst To Best

BBC

Running from 1975 to 1977, the Hinchcliffe era was a perfect and passionate storm, the result of visionary minds pushing against each other to create something they collectively believed in. It is largely because of this era that Doctor Who came to be an icon of science-fiction because it had created the icon of itself with the first three names you’d choose in their respective fields behind it. Actor Tom Baker, script editor Robert Holmes and of course, producer Philip Hinchcliffe.

As their first story, The Ark in Space, celebrates its fortieth birthday, it would be suitable to honour this golden age with a retrospective of all 16 stories. These stories sought to distance themselves from the outlandish action adventure stylings of the Pertwee years and focus on atmosphere through world building and good acting (which often was the case in this era).

These stories ended up being written as a family show…
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

21 Doctor Who stories better than their reputation suggests

From the Macra to The Mysterious Planet, Andrew finds the gold in oft-unloved Doctor Who episodes from across the decades...

For the show's fiftieth anniversary, Doctor Who Magazine ran a new poll ranking the 241 stories up to and including The Time Of The Doctor. The Twin Dilemma came last again, having done so in 2009 survey, and though it does have many faults, it isn't completely bad. Colin Baker blazes his way haughtily through it, and the story noticeably lacks energy when he's off screen. Perhaps it might have been marginally better just to have had the Sixth Doctor and Peri go to a Little Chef so he could complain about the service.

In the lower half of the poll (compiled by people rating all the stories out of ten) are some pretty good stories, or at least ones that arguably don't deserve to be there. We've therefore compiled a list
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who complete reviews: Listen

Here's a question for you. Do you ever feel that you're marching out of time with the rest of the world? Especially when it comes to popular opinion? It's a mystery that frequently leaves me scratching my head. Popular opinion meant that somehow, Jj Barrie's schmaltzy dirge No Charge sold enough quantities to reach Number One in 1976. Popular opinion means that every two years in June, people become football fans regardless of whether they like the sport or not. And of course, it also means the continuation of a past-its-sell-by-date-show in which three pub bores with stupid hair talk rubbish about cars for a merciless hour. Abraham Lincoln once claimed that standing by a principle in the face of everybody else rejecting it links the human to the divine – whether or not that includes popular opinion on another Steven Moffat script is a point still to be decided.

It's a funny thing,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Doctor Who: The Caretaker Review (Contains Spoilers)

BBC

Almost every Doctor Who writer has a certain thumbprint that they tend to leave on the stories they write. Steven Moffat has mind-melting time paradoxes, Classic Who scribe Robert Holmes had unsubtle political commentary, and Gareth Roberts has the Doctor trying to blend in with modern day humans; with The Caretaker being his third episode in a row to use this plot device.

But that’s not necessarily a bad thing since he tends to do it very well. Despite the mass of similarities to The Lodger (2010) and Closing Time (2011), The Caretaker manages to carve its own little niche as a relaxed comedic episode thanks largely to the completely different character dynamics at play this time around.

BBC

The real thing that the episode has going for it is the humour. It’s not the out there gag-a-minute humour of Robot Of Sherwood but it’s still a very
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Doctor Who: Deep Breath's references and callbacks

We spotted a few fun nods to previous episodes in Doctor Who's series 8 opener. And here they are...

There's a quote we often refer to at Den of Geek when writing about Doctor Who, and it comes from living legend Terrance Dicks about writing the show: 'You need a good strong original idea, but it doesn't have to be your good strong original idea.'

Steven Moffat is obviously aware of this statement, but has interpreted it differently to most. It doesn't have to be your good strong original idea, but it can be, and therefore that doesn't mean you only have to use it once.

On top of callbacks to some of Moffat's previous work, Deep Breath, has references scattered throughout, recalling the show's entire fifty year history. We've done our best to provide an extensive list, and you're very welcome to provide extensions and footnotes. So without
See full article at Den of Geek »

What Doctor Who series 8 can learn from Earthshock

On the eve of Doctor Who's new series, Andrew considers what lessons it could learn from classic Fifth Doctor story Earthshock...

1982's Earthshock casts a long shadow over Eighties’ Doctor Who.

After Tom Baker’s tenure – at best delightfully silly and dramatic, at worst glibly removing any hint of drama in a quest for a laugh – the show hadn’t exactly decided on what it was going to be.

Original Eighties’ script editor Christopher H. Bidmead firmly ushered in an attempt at a harder Science Fiction edge – with Tom Baker injecting some comedic moments – but this lasted one series, with Bidmead only returning to write Peter Davison’s first broadcast story after another script fell through.

At the start of the Davison era temporary script editor Anthony Root kept things ticking over with a variety of styles, some reflecting Bidmead’s taste in their commissioning, but the Davison era
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who Re-Viewed: 11 Doctors, 11 debut adventures

Digital Spy presents Doctor Who Week - seven days of special features celebrating the return of the world's favourite sci-fi series, and the arrival of a brand new Doctor - on August 23.

We've known he was coming since August 2013 - and he's officially been our Doctor since Christmas - but in a mere three days, Doctor Who fans will finally get the chance to size up Peter Capaldi's debut as a new, "more mysterious" Time Lord.

Between 1963 and 2014, the show's had 11 stabs at introducing a new Doctor - so before Steven Moffat's 'Deep Breath' is unveiled to the general public, let's take a look back at those other attempts - from the awesome to the audacious to the seriously misjudged.

The musical world of Doctor Who: From Ron Grainer to The Klf

An Unearthly Child

Aired November 23-December 14, 1963

Doctor Who fans accustomed to David Tennant
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Doctor Who: what series 8 can learn from The Ark In Space

Andrew argues that Doctor Who series 8 could do worse than look to Hinchcliffe/Holmes story The Ark in Space for inspiration...

4C or not 4C? (Yes, it's a cryptic start, but frankly we don't have enough production code puns on the website). Let us speculate, just for a change, about what series eight of Doctor Who holds in store.

Is Peter Capaldi's Twelth Doctor going to be a less risky version of the Sixth? Initially unlikeable, but with the audience warming to him as he progresses?

Is Clara going to become a more rounded character, with the writers raising their game to reflect the quality of Jenna Coleman's performance?

Will you read a comment along the lines of 'Actually there were twenty six seasons of Doctor Who already, so I don't see why you're referring to it as “series eight”'?

Maybe, maybe, and yes.

For those of
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who: 10 Creepiest Corners Of Steven Moffat’s Mind

BBC

Steven Moffat’s overly ‘timey wimey’ take on Doctor Who may not be to everyone’s taste, but there’s no denying that, on a good day, the man is easily the most ambitious, creative and original Who writer since the legendary Robert Holmes.

Now, it might seem to us Who fans that Moffat is the veritable ‘cat that caught the canary’. He is, after all, the lifelong Whovian that not only helped to bring his favourite TV show back from the brink of oblivion, but who also ended up as the series’ supreme creative authority just a few years later.

You’d think that those facts alone would make Mr. Moffat a happy, well-adjusted and overly good-natured person, wouldn’t you?

Well, he isn’t.

Like most great writers, the man is actually a deeply disturbed individual, one who clearly lives in a world populated by man-eating shadows,
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton & Tom Baker

Feature Alex Westthorp 9 Apr 2014 - 07:00

In the next part of his series, Alex talks us through the film careers of the second and fourth Doctors, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker...

Read Alex's retrospective on the film careers of William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, here.

Like their fellow Time Lord actors, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker also shared certain genres of film. Both appeared, before and after their time as the Doctor, in horror movies and both worked on Ray Harryhausen Sinbad films.

Patrick George Troughton was born in Mill Hill, London on March 25th 1920. He made his film debut aged 28 in the 1948 B-Movie The Escape. Troughton's was a very minor role. Among the better known cast was William Hartnell, though even Hartnell's role was small and the two didn't share any scenes together. From the late Forties, Troughton found more success on the small screen,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who: 5 Ways To Ruin A Companion Departure (And One Way To Get It Right)

It goes by and large without saying, but when you’re a kid watching Doctor Who, the news that the Doctor is going to actually die at the end of the episode is the most exciting thing ever. Obviously this is down to two big reasons-

1: Most other shows don’t have the luxury of killing off the main character and not… you know… ending. The sheer novelty value alone of discovering that the title character of your favorite show could very well be brutally killed off has rocked many a 12 year old’s world.

2: The old Doctor being killed off means that there’s a New Doctor coming, and we don’t know anything about him! If you’re the sort of 12 year old boy that has just spent the last six months making lists of stories with Cybermen in them and cross referencing that to stories
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Doctor Who: 50 great scary moments

Feature Andrew Blair 22 Nov 2013 - 06:43

Andrew counts down Doctor Who's 50 scariest moments, feat. Daleks, Cybermen, and Nicholas Parsons...

Doctor Who exists to scare children. It introduces them to Horror in a way that can prepare them for the increased intensity and gore of adult films, while its limited budget and family viewing constraints also mean it has to get under your skin in more creative ways. This list is not intended as anything remotely definitive, more a collection of fifty scary moments, scenes, and ideas that the show has given us over the years. There are obviously hundreds more out there, and a Comments Thread waiting for your suggestions. We begin at the beginning, but not necessarily in that order.

1. The first Tardis journey

Following an unsettling twenty-five minutes of investigation, torture and kidnap, our favourite family show was born. The Doctor decides schoolteachers Ian and Barbara have
See full article at Den of Geek »
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