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10 items from 2015

Turkey Shoot

22 September 2015 9:59 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Brian Trenchard-Smith's outrageous futuristic gore-fest imagines an Australian extermination camp run by the sadistic Michael Craig and Roger Ward, where jaded rich folk come to hunt human prey. The leading targets for this week's jaunt are Steve Railsback and Olivia Hussey. It is snarky? Is it subversive? An alternate title was Blood Camp Thatcher! Turkey Shoot Blu-ray Severin Films 1982 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 93 80 min. / Escape 2000, Blood Camp Thatcher / Street Date September 22, 2015 / 24.98 Starring Steve Railsback, Olivia Hussey, Michael Craig, Carmen Duncan, Noel Ferrier, Lynda Stoner, Roger Ward, Michael Petrovitch, Gus Mercurio, John Ley. Cinematography John McLean Film Editor Alan Lake Original Music Brian May Special Effects John Stears Second Unit Director / Executive Producer David Hemmings Written byJon George, Neill Hicks, George Schenck, Robert Williams, David Lawrence Produced by William Fayman, Antony I. Ginnane Directed by Brian Trenchard-Smith

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Who cannot appreciate a movie that carries the alternate title Blood Camp Thatcher? »

- Glenn Erickson

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Daily | Antonioni, Pasolini, Vertov

17 September 2015 1:39 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup: Essays on David Hemmings in Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow-Up, an unrealized screenplay by Pier Paolo Pasolini, Abel Ferrara's Pasolini, Dziga Vertov, both seasons of True Detective, Robert Wiene's The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Mysterious Object at Noon, Todd Haynes's Far From Heaven, Jack Clayton's The Innocents, Wim Wenders, Walt Disney and Bill Gunn's Ganja & Hess, plus interviews with Isao Takahata, Sean Price Williams, Oren Moverman, Veronika Franz and Severin Fiala—and more. » - David Hudson »

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The Forgotten: Richard Lester's "Juggernaut" (1974)

12 August 2015 5:41 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Inspired by the Richard Lester retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, August 7-13.When the great Omar Sharif died recently, the BBC's coverage of the sad event included clips from Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago, of course, and then cut to Richard Lester's Juggernaut just as the voice-over commented on the declining quality of Sharif's later films, causing me to splutter into my cocoa and pen angry letters to Auntie Beeb in my mind, for Juggernaut is a fantastic example of seventies British cinema. It's what I remember seventies Britain being like. The Christmas scene in Ken Russell's Tommy has the same effect on me, but that's because I was a kid in the seventies.Brown and orange color schemes, older men with long hair, and grim political discussions that went over my head but seemed to portend explosive doom: that was the United Kingdom in Ad 1974. In Juggernaut, »

- David Cairns

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The Man from U.N.C.L.E.: Will Guy Ritchie's cinema adaptation of a TV favourite fit the bill?

9 August 2015 5:34 AM, PDT | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

Updating 1960s television shows and films has often proved a fraught endeavour. Pop culture of that era is so familiar, and so often invoked, that any film-maker revisiting it risks seeming crass and unoriginal. Is there anything left to be said about Swinging London or Michael Caine in Alfie, The Italian Job and The Ipcress File? After Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999), what mileage is there in spoofing Sixties spy movies, most of which were made with tongue firmly in cheek anyway? Whether it is James Fox in a wig in Performance, David Hemmings with his zoom lens in Blow-Up (1966), or even Carl Boehm as the duffel-coated serial killer in Peeping Tom (1960), characters and images from many Sixties British movies are so familiar that they are beyond parody. »

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Arrow Films & Video announces October line-up

9 July 2015 8:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Arrow Films & Video have announced its line-up of new Blu-ray releases for October 2015, and once again there are some gems in the list. Chief amongst them are Clive Barker’s first three Hellraiser films in a limited-edition “Scarlet Box”, and a remastered box-set of films directed by acclaimed Japanese filmmaker Kiju Yoshida.

You can check out the full list of films and their special features below, as well as the release dates of the Blu-ray’s with some available in both the UK and Us.

Hellraiser: The Scarlet Box

Stephen King was once quoted as saying: “I have seen the future of horror… his name is Clive Barker.” That future became reality when, in 1987, Barker unleashed his directorial debut Hellraiser – launching a hit franchise and creating an instant horror icon in the formidable figure of Pinhead. Barker’s original Hellraiser, based on his novella The Hellbound Heart, follows Kirsty »

- Scott J. Davis

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36 major blockbusters and why they never got made

11 June 2015 6:53 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We look at the films that slipped through Hollywood's net, from biblical epics to a time travelling Gladiator sequel...

This article contains a spoiler for Gladiator

If you're one of those frustrated over the quality of many of the blockbusters that make it to the inside of a multiplex, then ponder the following. For each of these were supposed to be major projects, that for one reason or another, stalled on their way to the big screen. Some still may make it. But for many others, the journey is over. Here are the big blockbusters that never were...

1. Airframe

The late Michael Crichton scored another residential on the bestseller list with his impressive thriller, Airframe. It was published in 1996, just after films of Crichton works such as Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure and the immortal Congo had proven to be hits of various sizes.

So: a hit book, another techno thriller, »

- simonbrew

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Deep Red

23 May 2015 11:53 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

My first foray into Italian horror was Lucio Fulci’s Zombie (1980), seen as a delightfully repulsed 10 year old. However, Dario Argento’s Deep Red (Profondo Rosso if you’re Italian) was the first Italian horror film that actually intrigued me; same age, but very different feelings. The repulsion was there, that base fear, but set within a framework of beautifully rendered images. I didn’t know much about art, but it felt like that’s what I was watching.

Released in March of 1975, Deep Red was the latest thriller from Argento in the giallo style; an Italian term which has generally become  known to mean a gruesome, lurid detective story; so called due to the fact that the original Italian pulp novels a lot of these stories pay homage to were written on yellow, or giallo, paper. Argento was already making a name for himself worldwide with previous efforts in »

- Scott Drebit

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The rise and fall of Hemdale

2 April 2015 3:34 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Hemdale became one of the largest indie studios of the 80s with films like The Terminator and Platoon. Ryan charts its turbulent history...

When Platoon won four Oscars in 1987, it marked not only a new chapter in Oliver Stone's career as a filmmaker, but also the end of a decade-long battle. Since the 1970s, Stone had been struggling to make his harrowing account of the horrors he'd seen firsthand as a soldier in the Vietnam conflict, but was famously turned down by every major studio in Hollywood.

Platoon, and Stone, finally found sanctuary at a small independent studio with a grand-sounding name: the Hemdale Film Corporation. It was Hemdale, and its co-founder John Daly, that had taken a chance on Stone, and when Platoon came out in 1986, the gamble proved to be a shrewd one: its $6m investment was covered by the first month's ticket sales, and the film »

- ryanlambie

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The Conversation: Drew Morton and Landon Palmer discuss ‘Blow-Up’

19 March 2015 7:12 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Conversation is a new feature at Sound on Sight bringing together Drew Morton and Landon Palmer in a passionate debate about cinema new and old. For their third piece, they will discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up.


Landon’s Take:

The cultural impact of Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow Up would be very difficult to overemphasize. Upon release, Andrew Sarris referred to the film as “a mod masterpiece” and ‘Playboy’ critic Arthur Knight went so far as comparing the film to Hiroshima mon amour, Rome Open City, and Citizen Kane in its potential influence on filmmaking. The film was also a massive hit worldwide and the tenth highest grossing film in the United States in 1966 – a memento of a brief window in time in which an art film by an Italian auteur could also do boffo box office. And, having been denied a seal by the Production Code Administration, Blow Up »

- Drew Morton

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17 moments of movie terror in the bathroom

5 February 2015 7:47 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From toilet-based scares to nasty encounters in the shower, here's a selection of 17 memorable moments of terror in the bathroom...

Nb: the following contains potential spoilers and scenes which may be considered Nsfw.

The scariest moments in horror are often the most intimate - this is why knives are a far nastier, button-pushing instrument of death than the gun. As the Joker famously put it in The Dark Knight, “You can savour all those little emotions...”

Intimacy may be the key to understanding why, in horror films, so many dreadful things tend to happen in bathrooms. The bathroom is often where we go to be by ourselves - either to answer the call of nature, brush our teeth, or simply relax in the bath after a hectic day at work. Equally, the water closet also sees us at our most vulnerable: naked, or at least with our trousers down, and »

- ryanlambie

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2003 | 2002

10 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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