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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

1-20 of 42 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ Review: X-Men Meets Harry Potter In Tim Burton’s Painfully Clichéd Ya Saga

25 September 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children” is a movie intended to challenge the idea that everything has already been discovered, that the world has been completely strip-mined of its wonder. If the message comes across as canned and unconvincing, perhaps that’s because director Tim Burton has spent a large part of the last 15 years ghoulishly repackaging some of the most exhausted stories in Western culture — at this point, his involvement in this project is like John Lasseter making a film that lamented the decline of hand-drawn animation, or Zack Snyder making a film that lamented the loss of quality blockbuster entertainment.

Read More: ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children’ Offers Up An Appropriately Strange New Trailer – Watch

Of course, the film — an adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ 2011 Ya novel of the same name — could have been a perfect fit. Burton, much like young protagonist Jake Portman, has been »

- David Ehrlich

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Film Review: Tim Burton’s ‘Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children’

25 September 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The title may read “Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children,” but there can be no doubt for anyone buying a ticket: This is really Tim Burton’s Home for Peculiar Children. Not since “Sweeney Todd,” and before that all the way back to “Sleepy Hollow,” have the studios found such a perfect match of material for Hollywood’s most iconic auteur. It’s gotten to the point where the mere addition of Burton’s name to a movie title can justify an otherwise iffy prospect: You don’t want to see a “Planet of the Apes” remake? Well, how about a Tim BurtonPlanet of the Apes” remake? Now you’re interested! Here, there’s nothing forced about the coupling of Ransom Riggs’ surprise best-seller with Burton’s playfully nonthreatening goth aesthetic and outsider sensibility, which should put the director back on the blockbuster charts.

One of the kid-lit sphere’s freshest recent surprises, »

- Peter Debruge

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Travis Knight interview: Kubo, Kurosawa, Miyazaki and more

8 September 2016 9:34 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Sep 9, 2016

Laika co-founder, animator and director Travis Knight talks to us about Kubo And The Two Strings and its love letter to Japanese culture...

For over a decade, Oregon-based studio Laika has honed its own unique kind of animation. Mixing traditional stop motion techniques with 3D printing and CGI, Laika has produced such captivating movies as Coraline, Paranorman and this year’s Kubo And The Two Strings. The indescribably busy studio co-founder, lead animator, producer and now director Travis Knight describes Laika’s hybrid approach as “Cavemen side by side with astronauts”; whether a scene is brought to life with puppets, CGI or a hybrid of both, his films have a foot in both the past and the future.

Kubo And The Two Strings, Laika’s most ambitious film to date, also has one foot in the far east. Set in Heian-era Japan, it’s Knight’s love »

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The 27 greatest stop motion movies of all time

8 September 2016 8:33 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Sean Wilson Sep 16, 2016

With Kubo & The Two Strings now playing, we salute some of our favourite stop motion animated movies...

With Laika's visually sumptuous and breathtaking stop motion masterpiece Kubo And The Two Strings dazzling audiences throughout the country, what better time to celebrate this singular and remarkable art form?

The effect is created when an on-screen character or object is carefully manipulated one frame at a time, leading to an illusion of movement during playback - and such fiendishly intricate work, which takes years of dedication, deserves to be honoured. Here are the greatest examples of stop motion movie mastery.

The Humpty Dumpty Circus (1898)

What defines the elusive appeal of stop motion? Surely a great deal of it is down to the blend of the recognisable and the uncanny: an simulation of recognisably human movement that still has a touch of the fantastical about it. These contradictions were put »

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Q&A: Mark Steger Discusses Bringing The Monster to Life on Netflix’s Stranger Things

20 August 2016 11:27 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

If your summer this year will forever be synonymous with Netflix’s Stranger Things, then you’ve discovered the wonders and dangers that lurk within the small town of Hawkins on the nostalgic new series. For our latest Q&A feature, we caught up with Mark Steger, the actor who plays The Monster on Stranger Things, to discuss what attracted him to the role, getting into the mindset of the creepy creature, the films that influenced his performance, and much more.

Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Mark, and congratulations on your excellent work on Netflix’s Stranger Things.

Mark Steger: Thank you, I’m glad it’s resonated with so many people.

How did you prepare—mentally and physically—to portray The Monster on the series?

Mark Steger: In my work, I’m was always driving my body to transformed states and »

- Derek Anderson

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'Kubo and the Two Strings' Review: 2016's First Animated Masterpiece

18 August 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

"If you must blink," a voice says over the soundtrack, "do it now." Consider this sound advice for anyone who's just entered the stop-motion world of this late-summer fantasy: Close your eyes for a nanosecond, and you might miss the sort of visually mind-blowing shot or part of a sweeping, how-the-hell-did-they-do-that set piece that causes Pavlovian salivating. Take, for example, the opening sequence that occurs right after that line, in which a woman in a boat is buffeted by angry, violent waves. What appears to be a giant tsunami starts »

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‘Kubo and the Two Strings’ Director and Laika CEO Travis Knight Gets Personal

17 August 2016 5:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Laika has definitely come of age with “Kubo and the Two Strings.” The stop-motion samurai fantasy represents a summation of everything the Portland studio has accomplished with its four films to date. Its vision of mythic Japanese folklore is epic and exquisite while its heroic rite of passage is thrilling and tender. No wonder Laika president/CEO Travis Knight plunged into directing “Kubo,” undoubtedly the animation studio’s strongest Oscar contender.

Not surprisingly, “Kubo’s” also deeply personal for Knight. “It’s a story fundamentally about family, about a time when we cross that Rubicon from childhood to adulthood,” said Knight, “the things that we gain and the things that we leave behind.”

Clever, kindhearted Kubo (voiced by Art Parkinson of “Game of Thrones”) ekes out a humble living in a seaside town with his mother, telling stories and playing his shamisen. That is, until Kubo accidentally summons a spirit »

- Bill Desowitz

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Movie Review – Creature Designers – The Frankenstein Complex (2015)

14 August 2016 5:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Creature Designers – The Frankenstein Complex, 2015.

Directed by Gilles Penso and Alexandre Poncet.

Starring Rick Baker, Joe Dante, Guillermo Del Toro, Phil Tippett and Tim Woodruff Jr.

Synopsis:

Documentarians Gilles Penso and Alexandre Poncet interview Hollywood special effects and make up artists to explore the ‘Frankenstein Complex’ of creature design in filmmaking.

 

“Now I know why Frankenstein goes crazy and screams ‘It’s alive!'” This early statement from one of the many subjects of Gilles Penso and Alexandre Poncet’s Creature Designers – The Frankenstein Complex neatly summarises the ostensible themes of the duo’s documentary: obsession, meticulous craftsmanship, and the relationship between creator and creation, ideas that tie directly back to the eponymous monster of Hollywood’s most enduring horror icon.   

Indeed, the raison d’etre of The Frankenstein Complex is its exploration of the parent-child dynamic between the skilled crafts people and their monstrous creations; fans of creature design »

- Christopher Machell

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Chandu the Magician

9 August 2016 9:51 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Hissable villain Bela Lugosi is in denial --- no, it's actually star Edmund Lowe who is in the Nile, deep-sixed in a sunken sarcophagus. Lugosi's up top trying to get his art deco death ray in running order -- opposed only by some nubile babes and a Great White Hypnotist from the Swami school of mind control. Chandu the Magician Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1932 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 71 min. / Street Date August 23, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Edmund Lowe, Irene Ware, Bela Lugosi, Herbert Mundin, Henry B. Walthall, Weldon Heyburn, June Lang, Michael Stuart, Virginia Hammond. Cinematography James Wong Howe Art Direction Max Parker Written by Barry Conners, Philip Klein, Guy Bolton, Bradley King, Harry Segall from a radio drama by Harry A. Earnshaw, Vera M. Oldham, R.R. Morgan Directed by William Cameron Menzies, Marcel Varnel

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Around 2008 Fox Home Video made a last big push with genre releases on DVD, »

- Glenn Erickson

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Guillermo del Toro Interview: ‘At Home with Monsters’ and That Missing Sketchbook – Exclusive

8 August 2016 10:57 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

“There’s a love in the marvelous that intertwines in all my projects.” —Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein

“What is a ghost? A tragedy doomed to repeat itself time and time again? An instant of pain, perhaps. Something dead which still seems to be alive. An emotion, suspended in time. Like a blurred photograph. Like an insect trapped in amber.” — “The Devil’s Backbone”

 

Guillermo del Toro has trouble saying no. On the verge of starting production in Toronto on Fox Searchlight’s Cold War fantasy “The Shape of Water” and flying in to promote the opening of his Los Angeles Museum of Art exhibition “At Home with Monsters,” the Mexican filmmaker got on the phone with IndieWire. “I’m exhausted,” he admitted, “but this is light for me!”

Culled by Lacma curator Britt Salvesen from Del Toro’s extensive and eclectic home collection, which he calls Bleak House (after Charles Dickens »

- Anne Thompson

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Guillermo del Toro Interview: ‘At Home with Monsters’ and That Missing Sketchbook – Exclusive

8 August 2016 10:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“There’s a love in the marvelous that intertwines in all my projects.” —Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein

“What is a ghost? A tragedy doomed to repeat itself time and time again? An instant of pain, perhaps. Something dead which still seems to be alive. An emotion, suspended in time. Like a blurred photograph. Like an insect trapped in amber.” — “The Devil’s Backbone”

 

Guillermo del Toro has trouble saying no. On the verge of starting production in Toronto on Fox Searchlight’s Cold War fantasy “The Shape of Water” and flying in to promote the opening of his Los Angeles Museum of Art exhibition “At Home with Monsters,” the Mexican filmmaker got on the phone with IndieWire. “I’m exhausted,” he admitted, “but this is light for me!”

Culled by Lacma curator Britt Salvesen from Del Toro’s extensive and eclectic home collection, which he calls Bleak House (after Charles Dickens »

- Anne Thompson

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The Most Memorable Monsters at Guillermo del Toro’s Lacma Exhibit

30 July 2016 5:34 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then Guillermo del Toro’s new exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is sure to please viewers with an eye for the macabre. Titled “Guillermo del Toro: At Home with Monsters,” the show runs from August 1 until November 27, and will travel to co-organizing museums in Minneapolis and Ontario next year. Containing almost 600 eerie objects from the filmmaker’s private collection — including sculptures, paintings, costumes and books — the exhibition reflects his lifelong obsession with monsters.  

“You can see my movies over and over again, and you will see that I adore monsters. I absolutely love them,” del Toro said at Saturday’s preview, adding “I think humans are pretty repulsive!”

Though he doesn’t consider himself a horror filmmaker these days, del Toro’s Lacma exhibit is filled with the type of ghoulish artifacts most often associated with a Fangoria convention. »

- Matthew Chernov

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Review: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

18 July 2016 4:50 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

Once upon a time, a young film enthusiast was taken by Willis O’Brien’s work in King Kong and decided to devote his life to making fantastical films and memorable creatures that would be remembered for generations to come. This young man was Ray Harryhausen, and the newly released documentary by Gilles Penso, Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan showcases Harryhausen’s passions and the passions they inflamed and inspired in others, including such film personalities as Guillermo Del Toro, Steven Spielberg, Terry Gillian, John Landis, and Peter Jackson.

Recently released by Arrow video, the documentary is an obvious labor of love for all involved, as the interview subjects all seem very enthusiastic while discussing Harryhausen and his overlooked contribution to cinema, which has carried on a unique legacy with his use of stop motion animation and the often times ridiculously detailed puppets used to create countless characters and sequences »

- Derek Botelho

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'Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan' review

14 July 2016 12:10 AM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

Reviewed by Kevin Scott, MoreHorror.com

I remember it like it was yesterday. Matter of fact, I probably remember it more vividly than I did the actual day before today. Because what I’m speaking of was a pivotal moment for me. It was 1981, and it just happened to be the only family vacation that me and my parents went ever went on. I didn’t have a dysfunctional childhood by any means, my parents just didn’t like going anywhere. They pioneered the concept of the modern staycation long before it was a broadly understood term in our lexicon. We ended up at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and we were staying in an actual old school “Devil’s Reject’s” style hotel.

What I mean is that it was longer than it was high and all the room entrances were on the outside of the building. They also had cable TV. »

- admin

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Ray Harryhausen’s War Of The Worlds: rare footage lands

8 July 2016 4:15 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Elizabeth Rayne Jul 11, 2016

Footage has appeared online of the aborted Ray Harryhausen take on War Of The Worlds...

Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.

— H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, 1898

After the 1938 radio broadcast of H.G. WellsThe War of the Worlds sent primetime listeners in the Us into either a panic or a bomb shelter, that filmmaker Ray Harryhausen’s movie version never touched down on earth might be understandable (but still unforgivable). However, work was done on the film, and a clip from the potentially epic sci-fi film that never was has surfaced online.

Stop-motion animation master Harryhausen brought to life Wells’ vision of a slimy Martian with enormous bulging eyes, »

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Horror History: A Look at Ray Harryhausen’s Test Footage for War of the Worlds

8 July 2016 12:45 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

The Internet is a wonderful place filled with all manner of goodies just waiting to be discovered. Such is the case with Ray Harryhausen and his unused test footage for a film based upon H.G. WellsWar of the Worlds.… Continue Reading →

The post Horror History: A Look at Ray Harryhausen’s Test Footage for War of the Worlds appeared first on Dread Central. »

- Steve Barton

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Blu-ray Review: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

5 July 2016 6:30 PM, PDT | shocktillyoudrop.com | See recent shocktillyoudrop news »

Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Blu-ray review Release Date: June 28 Order your copy of Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan here! In 1997 Time Magazine’s Richard Schickel made an excellent hour-long documentary titled The Harryhausen Chronicles. Narrated by Leonard Nimoy, it went beat-by-beat through the filmography of special effects genius Ray Harryhausen and featured interviews…

The post Blu-ray Review: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan appeared first on Shock Till You Drop. »

- Max Evry

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Visiting ‘Kubo and the Two Strings,’ Laika’s Samurai Stop-Motion Adventure

30 June 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Laika’s fascination with folktales gets more sweeping and exotic with the samurai adventure, “Kubo and the Two Strings,” expanding yet again the boundaries of stop-motion.

“Every Laika movie has its own aesthetic, but this one’s more open and expansive— there are areas where the eyes can rest,” explained Laika’s lead artist/CEO Travis Knight, who makes his directorial debut with “Kubo.”

Citing an epic, fantasy quality reminiscent of David Lean, Akira Kurosawa, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, Knight couldn’t resist helming “Kubo” (shepherded by Shannon Tindle, who recently made the “On Ice” Google Spotlight Vr short and retains story and character design credits).

Read More: Watch: Laika Delivers Yet Another Spectacular Trailer for ‘Kubo and the Two Strings’“What really got me excited about this film was at its emotional core about this boy and his family and what would ultimately become his surrogate family. And that resonated personally. »

- Bill Desowitz

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Happy Birthday Ray Harryhausen – Here are His Ten Best Films

29 June 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

Special effects legend Ray Harryhausen, whose dazzling and innovative visual effects work on fantasy adventure films such as Jason And The Argonauts  and  The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad  passed away in 2013 at age 92. In 1933, the then-13-year-old Ray Harryhausen saw King Kong at a Hollywood theater and was inspired – not only by Kong, who was clearly not just a man in a gorilla suit, but also by the dinosaurs. He came out of the theatre “stunned and haunted. They looked absolutely lifelike … I wanted to know how it was done.” It was done by using stop-motion animation: jointed models filmed one frame at a time to simulate movement. Harryhausen was to become the prime exponent of the technique and its combination with live action. The influence of Harryhausen on film luminaries like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Peter Jackson, and »

- Movie Geeks

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Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

28 June 2016 8:19 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Release the Kraken! They're only now releasing this Blu-ray in the U.S.. The patron saint of every special effect fan gets the royal treatment in this career overview capped with industry testimonials and rare film items from a cache of 35mm outtakes found packed away in Rh's storeroom. Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Region B Blu-ray Arrow Video Us 2011 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 28, 2016 / 19.95 Starring Ray Harryhausen, Peter Jackson, Nick Park, Phil Tippet, Randy Cook, Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Tony Dalton, Dennis Muren, John Landis, Ray Bradbury, Ken Ralston, Martine Beswick, Vanessa Harryhausen, Caroline Munro, Guillermo del Toro, Joe Dante, John Lasseter, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg, Henry Selick. Original Music Alexandre Poncet Produced by Tony Dalton, Alexandre Poncet Written and Directed by Gilles Penso

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The time has long passed that Ray Harryhausen was merely a cult figure. By the release of Golden Voyage »

- Glenn Erickson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

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