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It Came From The Tube: How Awful About Allan (1970)

  • DailyDead
If anyone wrote the book on complicated parental relations, it’s Anthony Perkins. While Mother is nowhere to be found, this time around Tony is having Daddy issues in How Awful About Allan (1970), an effective, low key TV thriller directed by Curtis Harrington (The Dead Don’t Die). As long as you can leave Norman up in his room, you should have a good time.

Originally airing as an ABC Movie of the Week (because of course) on Tuesday, September 22nd, Allan had to contend with Hee Haw/All in the Family on CBS and the NBC Tuesday Night at the Movies. At the time however, ABC had this format on lockdown with audiences, and for good reason – they always brought in top shelf talent to display on the small screen, and How Awful About Allan is certainly no exception.

Let’s dig out our trusty and totally unreal TV
See full article at DailyDead »

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

More Gay Stars and Directors and Screenwriters on TCM: From psychos and psychiatrists to surfers and stage mamas

On the day a U.S. appeals court lifted an injunction that blocked a Mississippi “religious freedom” law – i.e., giving Christian extremists the right to discriminate against gays, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, etc. – not to mention the publication of a Republican-backed health care bill targeting the poor, the sick, the elderly, and those with “pre-existing conditions” – which would include HIV-infected people, a large chunk of whom are gay and bisexual men, so the wealthy in the U.S. can get a massive tax cut, Turner Classic Movies' 2017 Gay Pride or Lgbt Month celebration continues (into tomorrow morning, Thursday & Friday, June 22–23) with the presentation of movies by or featuring an eclectic – though seemingly all male – group: Montgomery Clift, Anthony Perkins, Tab Hunter, Dirk Bogarde, John Schlesinger, Tennessee Williams, Gore Vidal, Arthur Laurents, and Jerome Robbins. After all, one assumes that, rumors or no, the presence of Mercedes McCambridge in one
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Interview: Betty Buckley Talks Working with M. Night Shyamalan for Split and Reflects on Carrie (1976)

  • DailyDead
As a man with multiple personalities (23, to be exact), James McAvoy is enthralling to watch in in M. Night Shyamalan's Split, but just as intriguing is his psychiatrist, Dr. Karen Fletcher, played by the great Betty Buckley, who plays a nail-biting mental chess match with her multi-dimensional patient in some of the film's most fascinating scenes.

With Split now out on Blu-ray and DVD from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Buckley (whom many may know as Abby Bradford from Eight is Enough) about working with Shyamalan on both Split and The Happening, playing Miss Collins in Brian De Palma's Carrie (1976) and Margaret White in the ’80s Broadway musical adaptation of Stephen King's seminal novel, her new album Story Songs, and more.

Thanks so much for taking the time to talk with me today and congratulations on Split. I loved the film,
See full article at DailyDead »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part Two: Economics

The 1930s – more films about women, more films about working life. And often the two overlapped. You watch a film made today, it’s brutally clear that the people who made it rarely have to be anywhere In the ‘30s, at the height of the studio system, the entire creative force behind a picture worked 9-5 on the studio lot, just like anyone else. They had a workplace. And while many made a great deal more money than the characters they were depicting, they knew what it was to hold a job. That mindset, that constant awareness of money and office work and routine, bleeds into the pictures of the period.

Take a film like Rafter Romance, which played at TCM Classic Film Festival Friday morning. Ginger Rogers and Norman Foster star as two broke strangers living in the same apartment building (and they say people knew their neighbors back
See full article at CriterionCast »

Interview: Terence Davies on A Quiet Passion and His Love of Poetry

"I just knew she'd be right. And when we were talking, she said she had grown up with listening to the disc of Julie Harris reading her poetry. She knew her poetry and more importantly, she could read poetry as well. I just knew she was right. It's as vague as that. And god bless her! She stayed there for four and a half years. I don't know what I would have done if she said no. I'd have no idea who to cast."

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘The Haunting of Hill House’ Is Coming to Netflix From ‘Hush’s’ Mike Flanagan

  • Indiewire
‘The Haunting of Hill House’ Is Coming to Netflix From ‘Hush’s’ Mike Flanagan
Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel “The Haunting of Hill House” is getting another adaptation, but this time for television.

Netflix is developing a modernized series based on “The Haunting of Hill House,” Variety reports. Writer-director Mike Flanagan will be ushering in the ghost story for a new generation through 10 episodes.

Read More: ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ and a Sense of Belonging

In the original novel, occult and supernatural investigator Dr. John Montague invites a trio of people for the summer to Hill House, an old mansion built by a long-deceased Hugh Crain. Among the group are his assistant Theodora, the shy Eleanor, and future heir to Hill House, Luke. While Dr. Montage hopes to find scientific evidence of the supernatural, this quickly becomes a case of “be careful what you wish for. “ Not only do they begin to experience strange events, including inexplicable noises, strange writings on the walls and ghosts roaming the hallways,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Haunting of Hill House’ Is Coming to Netflix From ‘Hush’s’ Mike Flanagan

‘The Haunting of Hill House’ Is Coming to Netflix From ‘Hush’s’ Mike Flanagan
Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel “The Haunting of Hill House” is getting another adaptation, but this time for television.

Netflix is developing a modernized series based on “The Haunting of Hill House,” Variety reports. Writer-director Mike Flanagan will be ushering in the ghost story for a new generation through 10 episodes.

Read More: ‘The Haunting of Hill House’ and a Sense of Belonging

In the original novel, occult and supernatural investigator Dr. John Montague invites a trio of people for the summer to Hill House, an old mansion built by a long-deceased Hugh Crain. Among the group are his assistant Theodora, the shy Eleanor, and future heir to Hill House, Luke. While Dr. Montage hopes to find scientific evidence of the supernatural, this quickly becomes a case of “be careful what you wish for. “ Not only do they begin to experience strange events, including inexplicable noises, strange writings on the walls and ghosts roaming the hallways,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94
Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier starred as the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing
See full article at Variety - TV News »

These Three

Radical changes were required to adapt Lillian Hellman's Broadway play for post-Code Hollywood, to eradicate a theme that in 1934 was entirely taboo. But were audiences really unaware of the subject matter switch? William Wyler excels with this bowdlerized, yet curiously near-perfect, story about the power of scandal. These Three DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 93 min. / Street Date February 9, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Miriam Hopkins, Merle Oberon, Joel McCrea, Catharine Doucet, Alma Kruger, Bonita Granville, Marcia Mae Jones , Carmencita Johnson, Mary Ann Durkin, Margaret Hamilton, Walter Brennan. Cinematography Gregg Toland Film Editor Daniel Mandell Original Music Alfred Newman Written by Lillian Hellman Produced by Samuel Goldwyn Directed by William Wyler

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

William Wyler directed half a decade's worth of silent westerns before his big break came. From that point on he made high profile dramas, almost all of which are excellent movies.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90

Doris Roberts, Star of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond,’ Dies at 90
Doris Roberts, a character actress who labored honorably both on stage and screen for years before finding the perfect vehicle for her talents, the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died on Sunday. She was 90.

Her “Everybody Loves Raymond” co-star Patricia Heaton confirmed the news on Twitter.

A cause of death has not yet been released. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, Roberts died in Los Angeles. ABC and CBS also confirmed the news.

Roberts was nominated for 11 Emmys, including seven for playing Marie Barone on “Raymond,” winning four for her work on that series; she picked up her first Emmy in 1983 for a guest appearance on “St. Elsewhere,” making for a total of five wins overall.

On “Everybody Loves Raymond,” Roberts’ almost omnipresent Marie Barone (she appeared on every episode of the show, which ran from 1996-2005) made life difficult for her son, Ray Romano’s Ray, and especially for his wife Debra,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Berlin: Cynthia Nixon Waxes Poetic About Emily Dickinson, ‘A Quiet Passion’

Berlin: Cynthia Nixon Waxes Poetic About Emily Dickinson, ‘A Quiet Passion’
The British team behind “A Quiet Passion,” the story of one of America’s most beloved literary icons, Emily Dickinson, exhibited nothing but passion for their story of a wonderfully talented yet introverted poetic genius who never enjoyed recognition in her lifetime.

Discussing the film at a press conference ahead of its premiere in the Berlin Film Festival’s Berlinale Special showcase on Sunday, director Terence Davies, a veritable expert on Dickinson, said he had envisioned actress Cynthia Nixon in the role of Dickinson since the start. Herself a lifelong fan of the poet, Nixon said she grew up watching Julie Harris in William Luce’s “The Belle of Amherst” and always heard Harris’ voice as Dickinson. “Julie Harris’ voice was in my head. I felt so much kinship to her. I had grown up watching her. But I was not intimidated.” Nixon added that the one-woman play in which
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margaret Hall, ‘Late Show’ Actress, Dies at 84

Margaret Hall, a member of the cast on AMC’s “Remember WENN” and a quirky longtime participant on “The Late Show With David Letterman,” died December 21 in New York City of natural causes. She was 84.

Hall was a SAG/AFTRA & Aea member since the early 1950s, and on Broadway with Laurence Olivier in “Becket.”

The actress appeared on “One Life to Live” and “As the World Turns”; 1965 Hallmark Hall of Fame entry “The Holy Terror,” starring Julie Harris; 1978 telepic “Summer of My German Soldier,” starring Kristy McNichol; and “Circus” (1989), as well as films including “Weekend at Bernie’s,” Party Girl” and “The Guru” (2001).

Hall was a participant on “The Late Show With David Letterman” for eight months in 2004-05, each night waving goodnight to the audience with a huge bouquet of flowers in-arms.

She is survived by her husband, actor Gil Rogers, and daughter Amanda.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margaret Hall, ‘Late Show’ Actress, Dies at 84

Margaret Hall, ‘Late Show’ Actress, Dies at 84
Margaret Hall, a member of the cast on AMC’s “Remember WENN” and a quirky longtime participant on “The Late Show With David Letterman,” died December 21 in New York City of natural causes. She was 84.

Hall was a SAG/AFTRA & Aea member since the early 1950s, and on Broadway with Laurence Olivier in “Becket.”

The actress appeared on “One Life to Live” and “As the World Turns”; 1965 Hallmark Hall of Fame entry “The Holy Terror,” starring Julie Harris; 1978 telepic “Summer of My German Soldier,” starring Kristy McNichol; and “Circus” (1989), as well as films including “Weekend at Bernie’s,” Party Girl” and “The Guru” (2001).

Hall was a participant on “The Late Show With David Letterman” for eight months in 2004-05, each night waving goodnight to the audience with a huge bouquet of flowers in-arms.

She is survived by her husband, actor Gil Rogers, and daughter Amanda.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90
Martin E. Brooks, an actor, singer, director and writer perhaps most widely known for playing the bionic scientist Dr. Rudy Wells in the television series “The Six Million Dollar Man” and its spinoff “The Bionic Woman,” died Dec. 7 in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Brooks’ Broadway career included roles in Arthur Miller’s adaptation of Ibsen’s “Enemy of the People”; John Steinbeck’s “Burning Bright,” for which he received both the Theatre World Award and the Donaldson Award; Arch Oboler’s “Night of the Auk”; and John Van Druten’s “I Am a Camera,” for which he received a Tony nomination.

The actor also co-starred with Brian Donlevy in the national tour of Saul Levitt’s hit play “The Andersonville Trial.” Charles Durning had a featured role in that production, and as they worked together, he and Brooks forged a friendship that lasted until Durning’s death in 2012.

During his Broadway career,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90
Martin E. Brooks, an actor, singer, director and writer perhaps most widely known for playing the bionic scientist Dr. Rudy Wells in the television series “The Six Million Dollar Man” and its spinoff “The Bionic Woman,” died Dec. 7 in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Brooks’ Broadway career included roles in Arthur Miller’s adaptation of Ibsen’s “Enemy of the People”; John Steinbeck’s “Burning Bright,” for which he received both the Theatre World Award and the Donaldson Award; Arch Oboler’s “Night of the Auk”; and John Van Druten’s “I Am a Camera,” for which he received a Tony nomination.

The actor also co-starred with Brian Donlevy in the national tour of Saul Levitt’s hit play “The Andersonville Trial.” Charles Durning had a featured role in that production, and as they worked together, he and Brooks forged a friendship that lasted until Durning’s death in 2012.

During his Broadway career,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Ken Burns’ The Civil War

Ken Burns and Co. made a big splash with this historical docu miniseries that in 1990 gripped the imagination of the whole country. Eleven hours of history are a breeze when presented in what was then a new form: authentic photos and paintings accompanied by actorly recitals of letters and documents from the era. It all comes to life. The people enduring the War Between the States seem just like us, as if it all happened yesterday. The Civil War DVD PBS Video 1990 / Color + B&W / 1:33 flat / 11 hours, 20 min. / 25th Anniversary Edition / Street Date October 13, 2015 / 99.99 Starring Shelby Foote, Ed Bearss, Barbara Fields, James Symington, Stephen B. Oates, William Safire, Daisy Turner and the voices of Sam Waterston, Julie Harris, Jason Robards, Morgan Freeman, Paul Roebling, Garrison Keillor, David McCullough (narrator), Arthur Miller, Charles McDowell, Horton Foote, George Plimpton, Philip Bosco, Jody Powell, Studs Terkel, Jeremy Irons, Derek Jacobi, Kurt Vonnegut Jr.,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

James Prideaux, Playwright Who Wrote Katharine Hepburn TV Movies, Dies at 88

James Prideaux, a prolific playwright and television writer, died on Wednesday, November 18, in West Hills, California, as a result of a major stroke. He was 88.

Early in his career, Prideaux became a member of off-off Broadway’s Barr-Wilder-Albee Playwrights Unit, where his first play, “Postcards,” had the rare distinction of going from off-off Broadway to Off Broadway and then to Broadway.

He earned his first television credits writing for soap opera “The Secret Storm,” and the adaptation of his play “Lemonade” for “Hollywood Television Theatre” before Katharine Hepburn brought him to Hollywood to work on a screenplay, a project that was abandoned when she agreed to appear in the musical “Coco.”

His play “The Last of Mrs. Lincoln” starred Julie Harris in one of her Tony Award-winning performances in 1973. He teamed again with Harris and Geraldine Page on Broadway in his “Mixed Couples.” His writing in later years brought Elizabeth Taylor
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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