Shalom Harlow - News Poster

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Recommended Reading: The Future of Indie Film, Gay Culture In TV, ‘Reality Bites’ and more

America’s next Wal-Mart: The indie film industry by Beanie Barnes:

“The indie film industry is cannibalizing itself. Manohla Dargis is right – there are too many films in the ecosystem. And this oversupply didn’t just happen. John Sloss warned back in 2007 that the industry’s problem was not a shortage of films, but a shortage of eyeballs (Mark Gill issued a related warning in 2008). But the industry’s response to this warning has been to make more films. This is creating an economically valueless cycle where unprecedented “cheap” money is flowing into the industry and films are being made at their highest rate ever. Meanwhile the percentage of indie films (let’s say films made for less than $5 million outside of the studio system) that are financially successful has not increased, and the amount of money people make from these films has actually decreased.”

I Re-Watched Reality Bites
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Afternoon Buzz: Dolce & Gabbana Cast Boys For Menswear Show; Two Project Runway Contestants Had Meltdowns

Karlie Kloss, our darling supermodel of the new generation has once again nailed yet another editorial for Vogue — but the Brazilian version this time. [Vogue]

Here's a ton of new fall 2012 ads to update our previously compiled list, featuring Naomi Campbell for Pink and Shalom Harlow for Jason Wu, among others [The Cut]

We love Dolce & Gabbana's Sicily-inspired spring'13 collection! Look at them olive-skinned, lanky boys in summery village wears. So cute but so awkward. [Style.com]

Because if you are pretty and tall (or kinda tall, hi Kate Moss), you can be a model or better yet, model-turned actress. The latest addition to the pool is Erin Wasson; and we are curious how many there are in total. [Fashionista]

Feeling the urge to shop? Here are the good deals of the day: Prada, Derek Lam Rtw, Tory Burch, etc. [Racked]

I stopped watching Project Runway after season 6 because I don't really remember why, but for those
See full article at Celebsology »

Cartier's 'Celebrity Apprentice' ad: What was that?

Luxury jeweler Cartier is, it would seem, completely misinformed about who is watching NBC's "The Celebrity Apprentice." Or that's the only explanation we can think of for the 3:31 minute "L'Odyssee de Cartier" commercial that debuted during Sunday's (March 4) episode.

Let us be the first to assure Cartier -- and all high-end jewelers -- that people with the means to purchase jewels worthy of futuristic czars who live on a post-apocalyptic ice-age planet where gold CGI dragons chase panthers who are apparently in love with supermodel Shalom Harlow are not watching raunch queen Lisa Lampanelli and "Real Housewives of New Jersey's" Teresa Guidice jump through hoops for Donald Trump.

Though we're pretty sure that Teresa would totally buy a jewel-encrusted panther bracelet after watching the, umm, masterpiece. According to a press release, the ad is Cartier's first ever "film" and it was meant to embody the company's history.

"The filming
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Cartier Unveils Cinematic Jewel

HollywoodNews.com: the House of Cartier showcased its standout creativity and innovation with the international online release of “L’Odyssee de Cartier” – a three-and-one-half minute film that chronicles Cartier’s 165 years of rich history, offering viewers a tour of the one-of-a-kind jeweler’s cultural influences that include France, Russia, China and India. Making its U.S. television debut on Sunday, March 4, “L’Odyssee de Cartier” – directed by one of the world’s leading advertising directors, Bruno Aveillan – will air in its entirety during prime time on national TV networks.

The film tells the story of the jeweler’s unique history, from its beginnings as a jeweler to European royalty to its modern-day worldwide luxury status. It reveals a glimpse into an imaginary world inhabited by Cartier’s designs, under the watchful gaze of its familiar muse, “La Panthere” (The Panther). The film features many of Cartier’s most enduring and iconic designs,
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Gisele Bundchen Hits the Runway For Alexander Wang at Nyfw

  • Popsugar
Gisele Bundchen Hits the Runway For Alexander Wang at Nyfw
Gisele Bundchen got back to her modeling ways at NY Fashion Week tonight. She walked the runway at the Alexander Wang show and met up with pals Karolina Kurkova, Shalom Harlow, and Carmen Kass backstage. Gisele shared that designer Alexander Wang "asked me and I'm very happy I was able to be here." She was in the spotlight during the Fashion Week festivities after making headlines last week for her comments following the Super Bowl. Gisele dropped an f-bomb after the big game, expressing her frustration at the Patriots' loss against the Giants. View Slideshow ›
See full article at Popsugar »

Amber Valletta Talks Gamer with Movieline, Pays Valet

Through the '90s, the Phoenix-born, Tulsa-raised Amber Valletta was the essence of the term "supermodel," one of a handful of striking beauties to inherit the title from the Linda/Cindy/Naomi generation who defined it. With a face that could radiate everything from Grace Kelly throwback glamour to an almost android-like futurism, Valletta helped sell the illusion for labels like Louis Vuitton, Calvin Klein and Versace. She then moved into TV hosting work (with friend and fellow supermodel Shalom Harlow on MTV's House of Style) and eventually began to land film work. Living now in Los Angeles with her volleyball champion husband Chip McCaw and their son, Valletta struts back onto screens today starring opposite Gerard Butler in Gamer, a mind-control video game thriller from gonzo filmmakers Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor. We talked to Valletta about it, in a conversation that at times became hampered by the hectic,
See full article at Movieline »

Link Time!!!

Jessica Alba is the face of the new Campari calendar — Pink Is the New Blog Fab flash: Kate Moss collaborates with Liberty — FabSugar Sean Penn still keeps Madonna as a text buddy — MSN Hot Gossip Kim Stewart and Peaches Geldof take it off for Tatler — Lainey Gossip James McAvoy thinks Anne Hathaway is Oscar-bound — JustJared Bryan Adams has stalkers?! — D-Listed Shalom Harlow takes it off for Purple magazine (Nsfw) — Egotastic Check out the Pussycat Dolls' line of lingerie — Hollywood Tuna Axl Rose has been Awol for two months — Hollywood Rag Brandon Davis crashes into Pink's car — Idlyitw Julia Roberts has a crazy husband — cityrag Courtney Love takes credit for Britney's mistakes — MollyGood Another day, another tasteful outfit for Paris Hilton — I'm Not Obsessed
See full article at Popsugar »

Occupant in Himmelstein's 'World'

NEW YORK -- Writer-director Peter Himmelstein's dark comedy Peep World, a script selected for the 2004 Sundance Screenwriters and Filmmakers Lab, is coming to the big screen from production/financing outfit Occupant Films.

In World, Occupant's third feature, a tense gathering for a father's 70th birthday party falls apart over the seedy family revelations unearthed in one of his children's novels, titled Peep World. Production is slated to begin in the summer.

The project made its formal debut at the Sundance Institute Screenplay Reading Series, staged in New York in December 2004 with Jason Biggs, Shalom Harlow, Michelle Monaghan, Roy Scheider and Lili Taylor.

World marks Himmelstein's second directorial effort after his writing-directing debut, the insurance salesman thriller The Key Man, also for Occupant. The company scored big at September's Toronto International Film Festival by selling the Weinstein Co. worldwide rights to its first film, the teen horror flick All the Boys Love Mandy Lane, for $3.5 million.

Occupant, founded by producers Keith Calder, Felipe Marino and Joe Neurauter in August 2005, is in postproduction on Man, which stars Jack Davenport, Hugo Weaving, Brian Cox and Judy Greer.

Game 6

Game 6
PARK CITY -- For playwright Nicky Rogan (Michael Keaton), baseball is life. And since his team is the Boston Red Sox circa 1986, that means his life is about losing--big time. Game 6, written by novelist Don Delillo and directed by Michael Hoffman, is a fanciful journey into Rogan's heart of darkness. It attempts to walk the fine line between despair and comedy, reality and imagination, and often succeeds. For audiences prepared to take the leap of faith and accept the unusual tone of the film, Game 6 should be a winner. Others may wonder what the fuss is about.

In Game 6, DeLillo has adapted the hyper-real, postmodern style he fashioned for novels like Underworld and The Body Artist for his first screenplay. Things do not operate so much in the everyday world as the psychological realm where the inner life meets the street. So anything can and does happen with a logic of its own. Characters appear as if from off-stage and hold forth in wordy speeches more familiar to the theater.

On the eve of the opening of his latest play, and also the night of the fateful game six of the world series in which his beloved Red Sox will fall to the Mets in the most inglorious way, Rogan gets caught in an all-day traffic jam that is a metaphor for his own internal confusion. Although he is a successful playwright, he is fixated on failure, and the Red Sox are his chosen form of suffering. Since the age of six, he has been "carrying them on my shoulders," and can rattle off a litany of loses and near misses.

In the course of the day he conveniently runs into his teenage daughter (Ari Graynor) when his cab pulls up next to hers, and his down and out friend, the playwright Elliot Litvak (Griffin Dunne), who has fallen on hard times after the feared critic Steven Schwimmer (Robert Downey Jr.) panned his play. Rogan is terrified of the critic, who lives in an underground lair with a Buddhist motif, and hatches a plot to kill him. If this wasn't enough, Rogan's lead actor (Harris Yulin) has a mysterious parasite in his brain that is causing him to forget lines.

It's a lot for anyone to swallow and Keaton has been given a mouthful of DeLillo's elegant if somewhat stilted language. In the face of the impending doom of his play and the Red Sox, Rogan's journey is to find faith and discover that life is good. When Boston first basemen Bill Buckner famously lets an easy ground ball roll through his legs and the Red Sox lose, it is an opportunity for Rogan to change the way he sees the world.

DeLillo and Hoffman have set Rogan off on a noble pursuit that may seem more important and personal to him than the audience. We simply don't care about the critic and his bad review as much as Rogan does, especially since Downey's character is more silly than imposing.

But even if the style does not always work, it is a heroic effort to do something different and thoughtful under extremely difficult circumstances. Game 6 is a good looking period piece shot (by David M. Dunlap) in New York for "well south of one million dollars." The cast, especially Keaton, who carries the film on his shoulders, is never less than fun to watch. Graynor has a lovely New York-know-it-all presence and Shalom Harlow is stunning as an ethereal waitress who appeals to Rogan's better and worse selves. And as Game 6 suggests and the Red Sox have eventually proven, there is good reason to be positive about life, even in the face of overwhelming odds.

GAME 6

A Serenade Films Production, a Double Play Production in association with Vox3 Films and Shadowcatcher Entertainment

Credits:

Director: Michael Hoffman

Writer: Don DeLillo

Producers:Amy Robinson, Griffin Dunne, Leslie Urdang, Christina Weiss Lurie

Executive producers: Michael Nizik, David Skinner, Bryan Iler

Director of photography: David M. Dunlap

Production designer: Bill Groom

Music: Yo La Tengo

Co-producers: David Bausch, Nick Goodwin-Self

Costume

designers: Renee Ehrlich Kalfus, Elizabeth Shelton

Editor: Camilla Toniolo

Cast:

Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr., Griffin Dunne, Ari Graynor, Shalom Harlow, Bebe Neuwirth, Harris Yulin, Tom Aldredge, Catherine O'Hara

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 87 minutes

'Jury' order: Fox picks up drama pilot

'Jury' order: Fox picks up drama pilot
Fox has picked up the drama pilot The Jury, from Barry Levinson, Tom Fontana and James Yoshimura, as a series, possibly for midseason. The network has ordered five episodes of the 20th Century Fox TV legal drama, bringing the total order to six hours, including the pilot. Meanwhile, ABC has firmed up its commitment to the untitled Suzanne Martin comedy, ordering a pilot from the Warner Bros. TV sitcom about a hip single mom working as a wedding planner and her more conservative teenage daughter. Andy Ackerman is set to direct the pilot for the project, which had a put pilot commitment. He also will executive produce with Martin. Fontana and Yoshimura penned the pilot for The Jury, which examines the legal process through the eyes of the members of a jury. Levinson directed and guest starred in the pilot, which was filmed in December. The Jury, executive produced by Fontana, Yoshimura, Levinson and Jim Finnerty, stars Billy Burke, Adam Busch, Shalom Harlow, Jeff Hephner and Cote de Pablo. The drama was packaged by CAA.

Four added to panel for Fox drama 'Jury'

Four added to panel for Fox drama 'Jury'
Billy Burke, Adam Busch, Jeff Hephner and Cote de Pablo have been cast in Fox's legal drama pilot The Jury from producers Barry Levinson and Tom Fontana. Levinson is set to guest star in the 20th Century Fox TV pilot, which he also is directing. Penned by Fontana and James Yoshimura, the project looks at the legal process through the eyes of the jury. It is executive produced by Fontana, Yoshimura, Levinson and Jim Finnerty. In the pilot, now in production, Levinson plays Judge Horatio Hawthorne. Burke (Ladder 49) plays supervisor assistant district attorney John Ranguso, Hephner (Tigerland) plays assistant district attorney John O'Brien, Busch (Sugar & Spice) plays Steve Dixon, and de Pablo plays Maugerite Cisneros. The four join the previously cast Shalom Harlow.

Happy Here and Now

CineVegas International Film Festival

The future is quieter, emotionally subdued and grayly mysterious, at least in the small hop forward imagined by filmmaker Michael Almereyda. In the challenging, well-realized "Happy Here and Now", Almereyda has another potential critical hit to rival his last film, "Hamlet", and its commercial destiny looks promising.

Immediately engaging one with a succintly intimate tone while tracking parallel stories of wavering young souls living in a New Orleans shorn of its touristy surface, "Happy" succeeds in introducing a sci-fi concept that works best as a metaphor rather than as a prediction of the future. Through the Internet and sensory devices that capture one's facial nuances, it is possible to create a mask, or generated face, to engage surreptitiously in one-on-one conversations with strangers.

We see such a cyber-encounter right off, with Muriel (Shalom Harlow) conversing with a cowboy-hat-wearing philosopher who calls himself Eddie Mars. In another startling sequence a young fireman named Tom is introduced.

The film gets away with a risky gambit with lead Karl Geary playing both Eddie Mars and Tom -- although they are not one and the same person.

Enter Amelia (Liane Balaban), who comes to town looking for Muriel, her sister who has disappeared. Spiritually adrift herself but strongly motivated to find Muriel, Amelia stays with her aunt (Ally Sheedy) and teams up with an ex-government-agent-turned-private-investigator (Clarence Williams III).

Their first task in finding Muriel is to peer into her computer's memory, which leads them to Eddie Mars.

Eventually, it's revealed that the person behind the Eddie Mars "avatar" is termite-obsessed, wannabe filmmaker Eddie (David Arquette), who is also Tom's brother. Along with a sequence where Amelia dreams while still connected to the computer, Eddie's bumbling attempt to make a raunchy Internet short about one of his favorite historical minds, Nicola Tesla, deftly illustrates Almereyda's concerns about identity and communication.

"Happy" is beautifully acted and filmed, with the Internet imagery rendered in Pixelvision. The story is broadened nicely by including recently widowed Hannah (Gloria Reuben), a music teacher married to a fireman killed in the line of duty. Her sad quest leads her to Tom and their potential romance nicely brings us around to the hope of rebirth. The musical selections and score are big factors in modulating the film's subtle moods, while the late R&B legend Ernie K-Doe plays an important supporting role and sings "Children of the World" in one inspired sequence.

HAPPY HERE AND NOW

IFC Productions

A Keep Your Head production

Credits:

Screenwriter-director: Michael Almereyda

Producers: Anthony

Katagas, Callum Greene

Executive producers: Jonathan Sehring, Caroline

Kaplan, Holly Becker, John Sloss

Director of photography: Jonathan Herron

Production designer: Leonard Spears

Editor: Kristina Boden

Costume designers: Luca Mosca, Marco Cantoretti

Music: David Julyan

Casting: Lina Todd

Cast:

Amelia: Liane Balaban

Eddie Mars/Tom: Karl Geary

Lois: Ally Sheedy

Bill: Clarence Williams III

Eddie: David Arquette

Hannah: Gloria Reuben

Muriel: Shalom Harlow

Running time -- 89 minutes

No MPAA rating

See also

Credited With | External Sites