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1-20 of 79 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


‘Nerve’ Review: ‘Pokémon Go’ Meets David Fincher’s ‘The Game’ In This Fun Summer Surprise

26 July 2016 9:31 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Beneath the neon haze of its teenage fantasia and the throbbing obviousness of its platitudes about the perils of social media, “Nerve” highlights some ugly truths about the economy of anonymous spectacle. This is a film that knows what people really want to see when they think that nobody is watching them. Blisteringly cool one moment and ridiculously silly the next (much like its high school heroine), this punchy and propulsive late summer surprise is able to capture the way we live now because it displays such a vivid understanding of the reasons why we live that way.

Based on Jeanne Ryan’s 2012 novel of the same name and helmed by “Catfish” directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, “Nerve” will have a shelf-life of approximately 12 minutes (the technology it depicts has been revolutionized at least once since the movie wrapped production), but it sure is fun while it lasts.

The »

- David Ehrlich

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Watch ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ Director Brady Corbet’s Short Film ‘Protect You + Me’

25 July 2016 11:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After winning two awards at the Venice Film Festival last year (Best First Film and Best Director in the Horizons section), Brady Corbet’s striking “The Childhood of a Leader” is now in theaters. Le CiNéMa Club is celebrating that release by screening the actor-turned-filmmaker’s short film “Protect You + Me,” which he wrote and directed when he was 18.

Read More: Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

Darius Khondji (“Alien: Resurrection,” “Midnight in Paris,” “The Immigrant”) shot the film on 35mm; he and Corbet also worked together on Michael Haneke’s English-language remake of his own “Funny Games.” “Protect You + Me” won an honorable mention at the Sundance Film Festival in 2009. Here’s the 11-minute short’s synopsis: “The reminder of a long forgotten event, combined with a challenging situation, provokes a man to extreme reaction while at a dinner with his mother. »

- Michael Nordine

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Golem co-founder Josetxo Moreno dies aged 62

25 July 2016 9:06 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

San Sebastian to dedicate this year’s edition to late exhibitor and distributor, a champion of independent filmmakers including Lars von Trier, Michael Haneke and Takeshi Kitano.

Josetxo Moreno, co-founder and co-chief of respected Spanish art-house distributor and exhibitor Golem has passed away at the age of 62-years-old.

Pamplona-born Moreno was passionate about cinema from an early age. He founded Golem in 1980 alongside Otilio Garcia Gobeo and Pedro Zaratiegui, having cut his distributor teeth running a series of cinema clubs throughout the late 1970s.

The trio caught the wave of cultural liberation and experimentation in Spain at the time, which followed the death of General Francisco Franco in 1975 and the end of his repressive 40-year dictatorship.

They grew the company into onto one of the most important art-house distributors in Spain.

Auteurs on Golem’s slate over the years included Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, Michael Haneke, Laurent Cantet, Ari Folman, Asghar Farhadi, Zhang »

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Where the heart is by Anne-Katrin Titze

23 July 2016 12:35 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

At breakfast with Anton Honik, Miri Ann Beuschel and Forældre director Christian Tafdrup Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Roman Polanski's Rosemary's Baby, Michael Haneke, a rabbit memory not from Alice In Wonderland, Danish fairy tales, Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray, Molière's Tartuffe and an Andrei Tarkovsky tracking shot pops up in my conversation with director/writer/actor Christian Tafdrup.

In a turn of events straight out of David Lynch's Lost Highway book of identity magic, Kjeld (Søren Malling of Nikolaj Arcel's A Royal Affair) dreams to relive his younger days. This comes true in unexpected ways through Miri Ann Beuschel and Elliott Crosset Hove. With their son Esben (Anton Honik) leaving for college, Kjeld and Vibeke (Bodil Jørgensen of Cæcilia Holbek Trier's Agnus Dei and Anders Thomas Jensen's Men & Chicken) feel that their suburban house has become too big and empty for them. They »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Movies That Changed My Life: ‘Childhood Of A Leader’ Director Brady Corbet

22 July 2016 9:54 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Actor-turned-filmmaker Brady Corbet has had an interesting career. While he did TV work on his way up, even from a very early time in his career he was picking good projects. Starting with Catherine Hardwicke‘s “Thirteen” in 2003, by the time 2011 had rolled around he had already starred in films by Michael Haneke, Gregg […]

The post The Movies That Changed My Life: ‘Childhood Of A Leader’ Director Brady Corbet appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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The 20 Best Black-and-White Movies of the Last 20 Years

21 July 2016 11:09 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Once the default mode, black and white has now become a bold statement of artistic intention. What that intention is, however, seems to be a little bit different for all of the recent films that have made the most of it. Often, monochrome is used as a pipeline to the past — in “Good Night, and Good Luck,” a lack of color not only speaks to how history remembers Edward R. Murrow, it also conjures the imagery of his television news broadcasts. Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” similarly uses the technique to take us back in time, but is less about recreating an era than it is about establishing a chokehold of fatalistic austerity.

“The Man Who Wasn’t There” is another period piece, but the lack of color in the Coen brothers’ film — which was shot in color and then bled dry — assumes a moral quality, making Billy Bob Thornton »

- Anne Thompson, David Ehrlich, Liz Shannon Miller, Steve Greene, Sarah Colvin, Chris O'Falt, Kate Halliwell, Kyle Kizu and Zack Sharf

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Could the UK rejoin Eurimages following Brexit?

30 June 2016 3:50 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Eurimages executive director Roberto Olla reiterates that the door remains open.

The UK left Eurimages, the Council of Europe’s fund for co-production, distribution and exhibition of European cinema in 1996.

However, following last week’s Brexit referendum, the possibility of the UK re-joining the organisation may be explored again in a bid to safeguard some official ties with European partners.

Roberto Olla, executive director of Eurimages, which has 37 member states and an annual budget of €25m, has this week again re-iterated that the UK would be very welcome to come back aboard the fund.

“The UK is welcome to come back any time they consider right,” Olla said.

“Should the UK decide to leave the Council of Europe as well (as the EU), then joining Eurimages would be a little bit more complicated but not impossible,” Olla cautioned.

Eurimages and Council of Europe members include Norway and Turkey, neither of whom are EU members.

If the UK »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Could UK rejoin Eurimages following Brexit?

30 June 2016 3:50 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Eurimages executive director Roberto Olla reiterates that the door remains open.

The UK left Eurimages, the Council of Europe’s fund for co-production, distribution and exhibition of European cinema in 1996.

However, following last week’s Brexit referendum, the possibility of the UK re-joining the organisation may be explored again in a bid to safeguard some official ties with European partners.

Roberto Olla, executive director of Eurimages, which has 37 member states and an annual budget of €25m, has this week again re-iterated that the UK would be very welcome to come back aboard the fund.

“The UK is welcome to come back any time they consider right,” Olla said.

“Should the UK decide to leave the Council of Europe as well (as the EU), then joining Eurimages would be a little bit more complicated but not impossible,” Olla cautioned.

Eurimages and Council of Europe members include Norway and Turkey, neither of whom are EU members.

If the UK »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Michael Haneke’s New Film ‘Happy End’ Is Now Filming, Mathieu Kassovitz Confirmed To Join Cast

27 June 2016 9:05 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Europe is currently in as disastrous a state as any time in the last seventy years, one could argue. The refugee crisis that has seen thousands die in the Mediterranean as they attempt to seek sanctuary from war, the rise of the far-right in multiple countries, and, most recently, Britain cutting off its nose to […]

The post Michael Haneke’s New Film ‘Happy End’ Is Now Filming, Mathieu Kassovitz Confirmed To Join Cast appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Kassovitz Joins Haneke's "Happy End"

27 June 2016 9:01 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Mathieu Kassovitz ("Amelie") has joined the cast of Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke's next project "Happy End" for Les Films du Losange, X Filme and Wega Film.

The story follows a well-off family in northern France living in a bourgeois bubble unaware of the despair and human misery unfolding in migrant camps around the port town of Calais, a few miles from their home.

Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant also star in the project which just began shooting in Nord-Pas-de-Calais ahead of a 2017 release.

Source: Screen »

- Garth Franklin

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Michael Haneke’s Calais-set 'Happy End' secures deals as shoot begins

27 June 2016 4:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Les Films du Losange secures key deals; Matthieu Kassovitz joins cast also featuring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert.

Paris-based Les Films du Losange has unveiled pre-sales on Michael Haneke’s next film Happy End as the first day of shooting begins in the northern French region of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais today.

Few details on the production have been revealed publicly bar that the film will revolve around a well-off French family living in a bourgeois bubble in northern France, oblivious to the human misery unfolding in migrant camps around the port town of Calais, a few miles from their home.

As previously reported by one French media outlet, Matthieu Kassovitz has recently joined the cast which also features the previously announced Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert as well as a host of younger new faces.

A number of distributors who released Haneke’s 2013 Palme d’Or and Oscar-winning Amour – which made $34m at global box office — have »

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Michael Haneke’s Calais-set 'Happy End' secures key deals as shoot begins

27 June 2016 4:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Les Films du Losange secures deals; Matthieu Kassovitz joins cast also featuring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert.

Paris-based Les Films du Losange has unveiled pre-sales on Michael Haneke’s next film Happy End as the first day of shooting begins in the northern French region of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais today.

Few details on the production have been revealed publicly bar that the film will revolve around a well-off French family living in a bourgeois bubble in northern France, oblivious to the human misery unfolding in migrant camps around the port town of Calais, a few miles from their home.

As previously reported by one French media outlet, Matthieu Kassovitz has recently joined the cast which also features the previously announced Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert as well as a host of younger new faces.

A number of distributors who released Haneke’s 2013 Palme d’Or and Oscar-winning Amour – which made $34m at global box office — have signed »

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Michael Haneke’s Use of Sound and Silence Explored in New Video Essay

21 June 2016 7:12 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Michael Haneke is a filmmaker who demands his audience’s attention. Known for examining social issues and extensive use of static long-takes depicting characters suffering, he has been called everything from a genius to a sadist. A new video essay by Elsie Walker, titled “Taking Time to Hear: Accented Rests in Michael Haneke’s Cinema,” argues that the director is the opposite of a sadist.

Instead, he is a filmmaker who cares deeply enough for his characters that he takes the time to sit with them through their anguish, their fear, and their exhaustion. By allowing sound, including silences, to take center stage, Haneke is transferring this burden of compassion to his viewers. What results are contemplative, difficult works such as CachéFunny Games, and Benny’s Video.

Watch the essay below (with a hat tip to The Playlist) as Haneke gets ready to shoot his next film Happy End. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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8-Minute Video Essay Explores Michael Haneke’s Use Of Disturbing Silence

20 June 2016 10:45 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

If you ever decide to watch a Michael Haneke film make sure you’re in the right mood for something either punishing or provocative. It’s not to dismiss the Austrian auteur’s singular vision, but embarking into the world of his films is to often have your spirit and soul drained out. His work is rigorous, restrained […]

The post 8-Minute Video Essay Explores Michael Haneke’s Use Of Disturbing Silence appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Jordan Ruimy

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‘Casualties of War’: Brian De Palma’s Exorcism of the Vietnam War

17 June 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Taking a glance over his filmography, it’s quick to surmise Brian De Palma’s lack of interest in the words “Inspired By” or “Based on a True Story.” His attraction to images leans so heavily towards their natural falsity rather than some kind of prosaic yet still wholly phony verisimilitude. But one of the few exceptions lends a tragic weight that few of his films have.

The true story in question is what’s commonly referred to as Incident on Hill 192: in 1966, an American army squad in the Vietnam War kidnapped a young village girl, then subsequently gang-raped and murdered her. Journalist Daniel Lang brought this to further public attention with a 1969 article in The New Yorker entitled Casualties of War, of which De Palma’s film would share the name.

It caught the attention of screenwriter David Rabe and then De Palma, who had, since the late ’70s, »

- Ethan Vestby

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‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

14 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A 27-year-old dude from Scottsdale, Arizona, Brady Corbet has somehow become the go-to guy for major European auteurs in need of a young American who can pick up what they’re putting down. We may never fully understand how he parlayed a one-episode cameo on “The King of Queens” and a recurring appearance in the fifth season of “24” into a series of brilliant collaborations with titans of international cinema like Michael Haneke (“Funny Games”) and Lars von Trier (“Melancholia”), but it’s clear why Corbet might have a special appreciation for how public figures are often seen through the lens of their beginnings. With his unusually accomplished directorial debut “Childhood of a Leader,” Corbet delivers a strange and startling film that reflects the unique trajectory of his career, as well as the influence of the iconoclastic directors with whom he’s already worked.

The first strains of Scott Walker’s panicky score slice into the soundtrack like Penderecki having a heart attack, the strings cutting into archival footage of World War I troops marching in formation. The opening titles are draped in terror, and they steel audiences for an ominous origin story on par with the horrors presaged by “Max” or “The Omen.” And on that promise, Corbet delivers — albeit it in his own elliptical, psychically tormented, and increasingly hypnotic way.

The Childhood of a Leader” tells the story of a young American boy (Tom Sweet) coming of age in a snowbound pocket of rural France circa 1918. His young yet severe mother (“The Artist” star Bérénice Bejo) is fed up with her son from the start, and takes out most of her frustration on the various employees who rear the boy for her by proxy. The child’s father (Liam Cunningham, who “Game of Thrones” fans will better recognize by the name of Davos Seaworth), is an assistant on President Wilson’s staff, and is often away in Versailles working on the peace treaty that would ultimately end the war. On the rare evenings during which he returns home, the boy’s father is sometimes accompanied by a widower politician played by Robert Pattinson (a glorified cameo during which he willfully melts into the musty furnishings of Corbet’s sets).

The film seldom ventures outside of the boy’s house, pushing deeper and deeper into the opaque void of its protagonist’s malleable young mind. Corbet’s doggedly anti-dramatic script (co-written by his partner, Mona Fastvold) stakes the boy’s future on a debate between nature vs. nurture in which neither side ever seems to earn a clear advantage. Sweet, whose character is outwardly defined by a blank expression and a head of flowing blond hair (he’s often confused for a girl), delivers a tense performance that often feels modeled after his director’s seething turns in “Simon Killer” and “Funny Games.” You almost never know what the kid is thinking, but it’s telling that his moments of paranoid anxiety are by far his most visceral — an early nightmare sequence suggests that Corbet has a natural talent for eerie visual abstractions.

Read More: Brady Corbet and Mona Fastvold Talk Moody Sundance Discovery ‘The Sleepwalker

He also has a natural talent for the strain of winking, comically exaggerated gravitas that makes it tempting to suspect that hyper-severe auteurs like Haneke and von Trier are actually just taking the piss. Ostentatiously divided into five sections (an overture, three ‘Tantrums,’ and a coda), and refusing to speak the boy’s name until late in the film (so that viewers might tie themselves into knots trying to work out which fascist leader the kid will grow up to become), “The Childhood of a Leader” pits the intensity of its context against the banality of its incident.

The first two Tantrums are all portent and no plot; the most exciting thing that happens is when the boy paws at the breast of his pretty young French tutor (“Nymphomaniac” ingenue Stacy Martin). There’s much talk of language skills, and fluency becomes its own kind of power, but how that factors into Corbet’s grand design is no better explicated than the fact that Sweet’s character is exclusively raised by hired help, or the tidbit that his dad had been hoping for a daughter. And yet, the raw anxiety of Corbet’s vision only grows more palpable as Sweet retreats further from our understanding; by the time the film reveals itself to be more of a mind-fuck than a historical drama, you’re too rattled to feel tricked.

On one hand, the indelibly disorienting final scene feels like a hit from behind; on the other, it feels as though the film has been building to it from the start. Either way, “The Childhood of a Leader” leaves behind a squall of unanswered questions that linger in the mind long after it squelches to a finish. Is this a story about the merits of Freudian psychology, or its limitations? Is it about the making of a monster, or is its distance meant to mock the thinking that sociopaths can be so easily explained? Early in the first Tantrum, Pattinson’s character lifts a quote that novelist John Fowles would ultimately coin in regards to the Holocaust: “That was the tragedy. Not that one man has the courage to be evil, but that so many have not the courage to be good.” Other than Corbet’s promise, that sentiment may be the film’s one clear takeaway: Whether born or raised, leaders are only as powerful as the people who neglect to stop them.

Grade: B+

The Childhood of a Leader” plays at BAMcinemaFest on June 23rd. It opens in theaters and on VOD on July 22nd.

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Related storiesReview: Ti West's 'In A Valley Of Violence' Is A Western 'John Wick,' But Mostly Shoots Blanks12 Must-See Films at BAMCinemaFest 2016'The Childhood of a Leader' Trailer: Robert Pattinson Toplines Brady Corbet's Period Directorial Debut »

- David Ehrlich

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Dakota Johnson, Michel Hazanavicius titles head to Italy

13 June 2016 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Rome-based distributor Cinema pre-bought six new titles at Cannes.

Italian distribution veteran Valerio De Paolis may have completed the sale of his company Bim to Wild Bunch two years ago but he shows no intention of retiring on the proceeds from the deal.

The distributor has announced a slew of Cannes acquisitions for his burgeoning Rome-based distribution label Cinema.

Pre-buys at Cannes included David Robert Mitchell’s La-set thriller Under The Silver Lake; Michel Hazanavicius’s 1960s-set Jean-Luc Godard tribute Redoubtable from Wild Bunch and Aki Kaurismaki’s The Other Side Of Hope from The Match Factory.

“I love »

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Dakota Johnson, Michel Hazanavicus titles head to Italy

13 June 2016 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Rome-based distributor Cinema pre-bought six new titles at Cannes.

Italian distribution veteran Valerio De Paolis may have completed the sale of his company Bim to Wild Bunch two years ago but he shows no intention of retiring on the proceeds from the deal.

The distributor has announced a slew of Cannes acquisitions for his burgeoning Rome-based distribution label Cinema.

Pre-buys at Cannes included David Robert Mitchell’s La-set thriller Under The Silver Lake; Michel Hazanavicius’s 1960s-set Jean-Luc Godard tribute Redoubtable from Wild Bunch and Aki Kaurismaki’s The Other Side Of Hope from The Match Factory.

“I love »

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Dakota Johnson, Michel Hazanavicus titles head to Italy with Valerio De Paolis' Cinema

13 June 2016 5:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Rome-based distributor pre-bought six new titles at Cannes.

Italian distribution veteran Valerio De Paolis may have completed the sale of his company Bim to Wild Bunch two years ago but he shows no intention of retiring on the proceeds from the deal.

The distributor has announced a slew of Cannes acquisitions for his burgeoning Rome-based distribution label Cinema.

Pre-buys at Cannes included David Robert Mitchell’s La-set thriller Under The Silver Lake; Michel Hazanavicius’s 1960s-set Jean-Luc Godard tribute Redoubtable from Wild Bunch and Aki Kaurismaki’s The Other Side Of Hope from The Match Factory.

“I love Godard »

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Casting Updates for Michael Haneke’s ‘Happy End’ and Steven Spielberg’s ‘Ready Player One’

6 June 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Whether you think he’s a titan of contemporary art cinema or a moralizing hack, Michael Haneke will dominate much of 2017’s cinematic discourse with his new feature, Happy End. Earlier reports were vague, albeit intriguing, telling us the Isabelle Huppert– and Jean-Louis Trintignant-led picture will concern a “bourgeois, European family, blind to what is going on in the wider world around them,” specifically with regard to Europe’s migrant crisis.

So said Huppert at this year’s Cannes Film Festival:

“‘But you can imagine what a Michael Haneke film called Happy Ending will be like. You can imagine there will be a certain irony, a certain…’ – she hesitates playfully, choosing her words – ‘clear-sightedness. For me, the title says everything about how lucidly Haneke sees the world.’ Apparently it’s about immigration, I hazard. ‘Apparently. That’s not all there is to it. We’ll see.'”

Casting has »

- Nick Newman

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 79 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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