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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


New Directors/New Films Review: Jia Zhang-ke Produced 'K' Is A New Take On Franz Kafka's 'The Castle'

23 March 2015 1:01 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Franz Kafka is to film what lightning is to a bottle: many filmmakers try to capture him, but few succeed. Courageous men like Michael Haneke and Aleksey Balabanov have attempted the feat of translating Kafka's final work, “The Castle,” into the medium of cinema, only to end up with a square peg in a round hole. Now, we have a couple of new brave souls. Darhad Erdenibulag and Emyr ap Richard are co-directors from Inner Mongolia, who have chosen to tackle the labyrinthine world of bureaucratic abyss in Kafka's seminal novel as their sophomore feature. A supreme undertaking, and a valiant effort, ultimately, “K” is a resounding failure and a butterfingered attempt to capture the essence of a literary genius. For those unfamiliar with Kafka's work: firstly, I must implore you not to watch Erdenibulag and Richard's interpretation as an introduction. Secondly, the plot is wonderfully basic at its core. »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Best film and TV thrillers on Netflix

18 March 2015 3:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Thrillers come in all shapes and sizes, from sophisticated legal dramas to high-octane and shocking action features.

With the atmospheric and absorbing Netflix original series Bloodline arriving this week, here are some of the best TV and movie thrillers on Netflix:

Oldboy

Not for the faint of heart, South Korean director Park Chan-wook's Oldboy tells the story of a man who is locked away for 15 years without knowing the identity of his captor or the reason for his punishment.

When he is released just as inexplicably, he finds himself with only five days to unravel the mystery, save the woman he loves and seek vengeance against the people who destroyed his life.

Damages

The amazing Glenn Close and Rose Byrne star as two dysfunctional lawyers in the show that combines legal drama with psychological thriller.

With non-linear storytelling and a powerful atmosphere of paranoia over five seasons, you'll learn to suspect everyone, »

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Eastern Boys: Hustling for Love

6 March 2015 8:57 PM, PST | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

At the finale of Robin Campillo's masterful Eastern Boys, bourgeois, middle-aged Frenchman Daniel (Oliver Rabourdin) has overhauled his relationship with the Ukrainian hustler Marek (Kirill Emelyanov) into something totally unexpected. The journey to that climax is a rollercoaster of flirtation, betrayal, larceny, lust, love, dauntless deeds, comeuppance, and finally a benevolent acceptance of the pair's interconnectedness in a manner that neither of these devoted halves could foretell.

The film begins documentary-like, and you won't be able to guess who the lead characters are for the first ten minutes or so as the camera goes sightseeing amongst a bevy of young males meandering to and fro at a train station among self-absorbed travelers. Are the lads thieves or hustlers or just out for a lark? Some men eye them warily with a slight lust unsure of whether to approach or not. One station guard's suspicions are raised due the actions »

- Brandon Judell

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Les Films du Losange Boards Wrong Men’s ‘Prejudice’

6 March 2015 7:36 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris– Les Films du Losange, the Paris-based company behind Michael Haneke’s “Amour,” has boarded “Prejudice,” the feature debut of Belgian filmmaker Antoine Cuypers.

Prejudice” is one of the projects developed and produced by Benoît Roland’s Wrong Men, a Brussels-based, up-and-coming outfit that aims at supporting emerging Belgian talent and producing local movies for the international market.

The family drama features an international cast led by Nathalie Baye, Arno (pictured above with Cuypers), Thomas Blanchard and Ariane Labed, who recently won best actress at Locarno. The pic marks Cuypers’s follow up to the short film “A New Old Story.”

Prejudice” centers around a family celebration that unravels after a young women (Ariane Labed) announces to her brother Cedric (Thomas Blanchard) and parents (Nathalie Baye and Arno) that she’s expecting a baby. Cedric reacts to the news with anger and starts exposing the prejudice he claims to be facing. »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Critics Look Back on Berlin, Where Kink and Quality Collide

16 February 2015 1:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Scott Foundas: Well, Peter, another Berlin Film Festival has come to a close, ending on a high note with the awarding of its top prize, the Golden Bear, to Jafar Panahi’s “Taxi.” Panahi’s film screened right at the start of the festival and emerged as an early consensus favorite among critics here. As it turns out, the Darren Aronofsky-led jury felt the same way, and I’d like to think their decision was based solely on the movie’s artistic merits, rather than the unfortunate position in which its director finds himself in his native Iran, where he’s been under house arrest for the last four years. It’s impossible, of course, to watch “Taxi” without thinking about the unusual circumstances under which it was made — something this highly self-reflexive film very much invites you to do. But what makes “Taxi” a great movie, I think, »

- Peter Debruge and Scott Foundas

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Berlin Film Review: ‘600 Miles’

7 February 2015 11:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

America’s Second Amendment inadvertently serves to keep Mexican drug cartels stocked with U.S.-made, military-grade artillery in “600 Miles,” an understated, astutely gauged look at the way weapons flow south to arm Latin American infighting, as seen through the eyes of two characters on opposing sides of the law: a low-level Mexican weapons smuggler (Kristyan Ferrer) and the American Atf agent (Tim Roth) he kidnaps after a bust goes bad. Whereas many directors would be tempted to exploit the subject in over-the-top action-movie mode, first-timer Gabriel Ripstein opts for a less sensational, true-to-life approach suited for discriminating festival and arthouse audiences.

Following in the gritty-realism tradition of “Maria Full of Grace,” while acknowledging that the illicit traffic flows both ways — in this case, from north to south — “600 Miles” tackles an issue that’s gotten considerably less exposure in the news for the simple fact that Americans don’t seem »

- Peter Debruge

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The best award-winning films on Netflix

6 February 2015 2:00 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

We're knee-deep in awards season at the moment, with all the attendant speculation, drama and controversy you would expect. Who should win? Who was snubbed? Who will fall over before they reach the podium? We're looking at you, Jennifer Lawrence.

Around this time, we tend to realise the shocking number of lauded films from previous years which we still haven't seen. So here's a selection of the best award-winning films you can catch up with on Netflix:

The Godfather

Francis Ford Coppola's 1972 classic hardly needs an introduction from us. The film took three Oscars including Best Picture and Best Actor for Marlon Brando, as well as a record five Golden Globes and further nods from the Grammys, and Writers and Directors Guilds of America.

Brando's performance as mafia boss Vito Corleone is, of course, legendary, with other fantastic turns from Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, James Caan and Robert Duvall. »

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French Film Hub in Search of International Franchises

5 February 2015 2:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris — The Paris-Ile de France region is increasingly positioning itself as Europe’s premier film production hub, while simultaneously building synergies with its closest rival, London, and also with production centers in Belgium and Luxembourg.

In recent years there has been a sea change in the way the local industry works. Since the Nouvelle Vague, France has charted its own distinctive path in the film world, including a strong emphasis on auteur films. But this underlying commitment to the “Art et Essai” — broadly, arthouse — films is complemented by a new generation of directors interested in integrating VFX and animation work within their projects.

In the wake of the digital revolution, all areas of French film production have gone digital, including subtle use of “invisible” VFX on auteur films. Recent examples include VFX work by Mikros Image on Michael Haneke’s “Amour” and Jacques Audiard’s “Rust and Bone” and Buf »

- Martin Dale

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Mikros Image Follows Success of ‘Asterix’ with ‘Mune’ and ‘Little Prince’

3 February 2015 3:13 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Paris – France’s Mikros Image, with headquarters in Paris and offices in Montreal, Los Angeles, Liège, Brussels, Luxembourg and Milan, plans to reinforce its animation and VFX work, revolving primarily around its three-main operation centers: Paris, Belgium and Montreal.

With a 250-strong workforce, the company is one of France’s veteran and most highly-respected VFX shingles.

Mikros rose to international recognition with its 2010 Oscar-winning toon short “Logorama” and bowed a dedicated animation division in June 2012 in Levallois-Perret, Paris.

Its first animation feature, Louis Clichy and Alexandre Astier’s €37 million ($42 million) “Asterix: the Land of the Gods,” was released in France on Nov. 26, clocking up 0.93 million admissions for distributor Snd  in its opening week. The film’s cumulative 3.2 million admissions, complemented by worldwide sales, makes it one of the most successful French toon pics ever.

A further two animation projects – from Mikros’ operation in Montreal – are slated for 2015 releases: “The Little Prince” directed by Mark Osborne, »

- Martin Dale

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Film Review: 'Amour Fou'

3 February 2015 1:24 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ Jessica Hausner's Amour Fou (2014) has enjoyed considerable praise since it premiered in the Un Certain Regard section back at the Cannes Film Festival last May and is a quietly effective denunciation of the idea of dying for love. It's a reserved period piece, but as with her brilliant Lourdes (2009) it's Hausner's restraint that ends up imbuing her argument with power. We meet German romantic writer Heinrich von Kleist (Christian Friedel, who audiences may recognise from fellow Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke's Palme d'Or-winning The White Ribbon) as a young, melancholy poet more than a little in love with the notion of death.

»

- CineVue UK

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Meiko Kaji: Under The Sign Of Scorpion. Watch The Trailer For The Upcoming Doc

2 February 2015 7:30 AM, PST | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Paris based director Yves Montmayeur has carved out quite a niche for himself with an extensive filmography of acclaimed, film-related documentaries. His 2013 Michael Haneke focused effort - Michael H Profession: Director - is something of an anomaly in Montmayeur's work in that it casts its eye on a European talent rather than to Asia but the director of Pinku Eiga: Inside The Pleasure Dome Of Japanese Erotic Cinema, Johnnie Got His Gun, In The Mood For Doyle and Electric Yakuza Go To Hell returns to his regular stomping ground of Asian cult cinema with his upcoming Meiko Kaji: Under The Sign Of Scorpion.The subject, of course, is iconic Japanese actress Kaji Meiko, leading lady in the Female Convict Scorpion and Lady Snowblood films -...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Deneuve is César Award Record-Tier; Stewart Among Rare Anglophone Nominees in Last Four Decades

30 January 2015 1:36 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Catherine Deneuve: César Award Besst Actress Record-Tier (photo: Catherine Deneuve in 'In the Courtyard / Dans la cour') (See previous post: "Kristen Stewart and Catherine Deneuve Make César Award History.") Catherine Deneuve has received 12 Best Actress César nominations to date. Deneuve's nods were for the following movies (year of film's release): Pierre Salvadori's In the Courtyard / Dans la Cour (2014). Emmanuelle Bercot's On My Way / Elle s'en va (2013). François Ozon's Potiche (2010). Nicole Garcia's Place Vendôme (1998). André Téchiné's Thieves / Les voleurs (1996). André Téchiné's My Favorite Season / Ma saison préférée (1993). Régis Wargnier's Indochine (1992). François Dupeyron's Strange Place for an Encounter / Drôle d'endroit pour une rencontre (1988). Jean-Pierre Mocky's Agent trouble (1987). André Téchiné's Hotel America / Hôtel des Amériques (1981). François Truffaut's The Last Metro / Le dernier métro (1980). Jean-Paul Rappeneau's Le sauvage (1975). Additionally, Catherine Deneuve was nominated in the Best Supporting Actress category »

- Steve Montgomery

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Sundance Review: 'Take Me To The River’ Features Solid Performances In A Genuinely Peculiar Film

27 January 2015 2:28 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s a lonely and unforgiving road to take, but daring filmmakers often like to box us into challenging places. Michael Haneke has made an entire career based on bracing confrontation, and some of the best films of 2014 were engrossingly austere and demanding in presentation and form (“Under The Skin,” “Foxcatcher,” Enemy”). But we rarely see such taxing audacity from first time filmmakers. Making his debut feature-length effort with “Take Me To The River,” Matt Sobel borrows a page from the uncomfortable school of filmmaking, but colors it with his own peculiar, but distinct, perspective. Controlled and self-assured, Sobel’s mysterious film is interested in the odd sensations of confusion, misperception, and misunderstandings. Played out like a genuinely strange waking dream, “Take Me To The River” plunges you into the cloudy waters of “what the fuck is going on?” On a Nebraskan farm, a large, but unassuming family reunion is taking place. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Amour Fou developing films with Nobel prize-winner

26 January 2015 11:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Production outfit Amour Fou is in development on two projects - including a “feminist vampire” film - with Nobel prize winning Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek.

The Vienna and Luxembourg-based firm, co-founded by Alexander Dumreicher-Ivanceanu and Bady Minck, are currently at the International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) (Jan 21-Feb 1) for the world premiere of its new film, Dreams Rewired narrated by Tilda Swinton.

Speaking in Rotterdam, the producers revealed that the first project in development with Jelinek is La Belle Dormeuse (The Beautiful Woman Sleeping), to be directed by Ulrike Ottinger. It is described by the producers as “a modern feminist vampire story”.

The second is Die Liebhaberinnen (Women As Lovers), which is adapted from Jelinek’s 1975 novel of the same name and will be directed by newcomer Caroline Kox.

Amour Fou is already producing a short film by Kox, titled Casting A Woman.

The Jelinek projects are likely to shoot in 2016.

Ambitious projects

In the meantime, the company »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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2015 Sundance Diary: ‘A Walk in the Woods,’ ‘Eden,’ ‘Z for Zachariah’ & ‘Knock Knock’

25 January 2015 11:43 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Park City, Utah – There are too many films and not enough time between shuttle shuffles and line waiting to cover the festival day by day. So, in pure improvised festival-going fashion, I’ll now be posting reviews for material that I see, but necessarily in viewing order. Enjoy!

A Walk in the Woods

A Walk in the Woods

Image credit: Sundance Institute

A human being who looks better at his current age than I ever will in my entire life, Robert Redford has a sprightly screen presence that has carried him through thick and thin, even brutal storms that live-or-die on his charisma (Aka “All is Lost,” one of the best films of 2013). For his next adventure, Redford goes softer than a survival story, but nonetheless into an amusing jaunt with “A Walk in the Woods.”

Based on the nonfictional accounts by New Hampshire writer Bill Bryson, Redford embodies the author as an amusing smart-ass, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Sundance Film Review: ‘James White’

23 January 2015 1:05 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The sudden loss of one parent and the looming death of another set the stage for “James White,” a stripped-bare family drama that marks the feature directing debut of indie producer Josh Mond. Familiar in its general trajectory, but unusually raw and ragged in its emotional architecture, Mond’s fraught portrait of a mother and son in crisis sports a pair of knockout performances by Cynthia Nixon and “Girls” alumnus Christopher Abbott, and a vivid feel for wayward New York youths cocooned by upper-middle-class privilege, but little in the way of redemptive creature comforts. Audiences seeking spiritual uplift are strongly advised to look elsewhere.

Mond, who previously directed several short films, is best known as the longtime producing partner of directors Antonio Campos (“Afterschool”) and Sean Durkin (“Martha Marcy May Marlene”), whose New York-based Borderline Films collective has carved out a certain niche of dark, provocative psychological dramas strongly influenced »

- Scott Foundas

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Sundance Film Review: ‘The Witch’

23 January 2015 9:32 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A fiercely committed ensemble and an exquisite sense of historical detail conspire to cast a highly atmospheric spell in “The Witch,” a strikingly achieved tale of a mid-17th-century New England family’s steady descent into religious hysteria and madness. Laying an imaginative foundation for the 1692 Salem witchcraft trials that would follow decades later, writer-director Robert Eggers’ impressive debut feature walks a tricky line between disquieting ambiguity and full-bore supernatural horror, but leaves no doubt about the dangerously oppressive hold that Christianity exerted on some dark corners of the Puritan psyche. With its formal, stylized diction and austere approach to genre, this accomplished feat of low-budget period filmmaking will have to work considerable marketing magic to translate appreciative reviews into specialty box-office success, but clearly marks Eggers as a storyteller of unusual rigor and ambition.

A New England-born, Brooklyn-based talent who started out in the theater, Eggers has several film »

- Justin Chang

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Sign Language Film ‘The Tribe’ Features In 44th New Directors/New Films Series

21 January 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

The Museum Of Modern Art and the Film Society Of Lincoln Center announced the first nine films in the long-lived showcase for new work. They include Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy’s winner of the Critics’ Week grand prize at Cannes, which is set in a Ukrainian school for deaf and mute coeds and is told entirely in sign language, with no subtitles. The Tribe is one of four films that will make their way to Manhattan from Park City, Utah, where they’re also on the Sundance roster: Charles Poekel’s Christmas, Again, about a heartbroken Christmas-tree salesman; Rick Alverson’s Entertainment, a follow-up to The Comedy, about a broken-down comedian doing stand-up across the Mojave Desert and Kornél Mundruczó’s White God, winner of the Un Certain Regard prize at Cannes about a dog’s journey back to its owner after being abandoned in the city.

Representing 11 countries from around the world, »

- The Deadline Team

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The Dark Valley | DVD Review

20 January 2015 8:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Arriving on DVD without having experienced a Us theatrical release, The Dark Valley toured several smaller film festivals after premiering a year ago at the Berlin International Film Festival. Multiple category winner at both the German Film and Bavarian Film Awards, with a stop at Karlovy Vary and a late 2014 North American stint, which included programming in the mini German Currents events in Los Angeles, it’s unfortunate the title didn’t receive a wider platform considering its rather curious elements.

Selected as Austria’s entry for this year’s Foreign Language Oscar submission, this is perhaps director Andreas Prochaska’s most accomplished narrative effort, as he’s generally steeped in television or pulpy genre. His latest, a by-the-numbers Western, captures a rather poetic ambience, even as it manages to neglect both its protagonist and rather garish details that skews the film into horror film territory. UK star Sam Riley »

- Nicholas Bell

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Isabelle Huppert Talks About Her Recent U.S. Productions

19 January 2015 7:48 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Marrakech’s jury prexy, Isabelle Huppert, has just completed a four-month stint in the United States, where she co-starred with Cate Blanchett in the Sydney Theater Company production of Jean Genet’s “The Maids,” at the Lincoln Center Festival, followed by her film roles in Joachim Trier’s “Louder than Bombs,” alongside Jesse Eisenberg and Gabriel Byrne, and in Guillaume Nicloux’s “The Valley of Love,” with Gerard Depardieu.

In an interview at the Marrakech film festival she explained that her recent intensive U.S. experience is a pure coincidence of back-to-back projects.

She then talked about her upcoming projects with directors such as Paul Verhoeven, as well as other helmers with whom she would like to work, including Christopher Nolan and David Cronenberg.

Huppert explained that she’s very happy with the roles that she has been offered recently and is not overly concerned about being typecast, for example »

- Martin Dale

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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