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Maggie Gyllenhaal Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (35) | Personal Quotes (26) | Salary (1)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 16 November 1977Lower East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameMargolit Ruth Gyllenhaal
Height 5' 9" (1.75 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Academy Award-nominated actress Maggie Gyllenhaal was born on November 16, 1977, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City. Her parents, Naomi Foner (née Achs) and Stephen Gyllenhaal, are both filmmakers, and her brother is actor Jake Gyllenhaal. Her mother is from an Ashkenazi Jewish family, while her father has Swedish, English, Swiss-German, and German ancestry.

Maggie made her film debut in Stephen's film Waterland (1992). She had sporadic roles throughout her teenage years, though she stepped away to receive a degree in literature from Columbia University in 1999. In addition, she studied briefly at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, which helped with her post-graduation transition back in to acting.

Soon after graduation, Gyllenhaal appeared in supporting roles in Cecil B. DeMented (2000) and alongside brother Jake Gyllenhaal in Donnie Darko (2001). Her breakout role came a bit later, when she took on the daring, sexy title role in Secretary (2002). That part wound up earning her a Golden Globe nomination, and Gyllenhaal followed that up with supporting turns in 40 Days and 40 Nights (2002), Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002), Adaptation. (2002), and Mona Lisa Smile (2003), among other movies.

Gyllenhaal received her second Golden Globe nomination for playing a recent prison parolee in Sherrybaby (2006). She followed that up with roles in World Trade Center (2006) and Stranger Than Fiction (2006), and then replaced Katie Holmes in the role of Rachel Dawes in The Dark Knight (2008).

In 2009, Gyllenhaal received great acclaim for her role opposite Jeff Bridges in Crazy Heart (2009), which earned the actress her first Oscar nomination. Since then, Gyllenhaal has been seen in Nanny McPhee Returns (2010), Hysteria (2011) and Won't Back Down (2012).

Gyllenhaal has two children with husband Peter Sarsgaard, whom she married in 2009.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous and Bee

Spouse (1)

Peter Sarsgaard (2 May 2009 - present) (2 children)

Trivia (35)

Older sister of Jake Gyllenhaal.
Daughter of Stephen Gyllenhaal and Naomi Foner.
Earned a B.A. in English from Columbia University (1999).
Studied briefly at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London.
The first six movies she made (Waterland (1992); A Dangerous Woman (1993); Shattered Mind (1996); The Patron Saint of Liars (1998); Homegrown (1998); Resurrection (1999)) were all directed by her father.
During the 2003 Academy Awards, she wore a peace sign pin in support of the organization Artists United to Win Without War.
She co-hosted the Sundance Awards 2003.
Played sister to real-life brother Jake Gyllenhaal in the movie Donnie Darko (2001).
Broke up with her artist boyfriend of five years during the filming of Secretary (2002).
Has been in three movies with her brother Jake Gyllenhaal: A Dangerous Woman (1993) (which was directed by their father), Homegrown (1998) (which was directed by their father), and Donnie Darko (2001).
Was born in New York City but grew up in Los Angeles where she and her brother attended the prestigious Harvard-Westlake prep school. Returned to New York when she was 17.
Her mother is a Golden Globe-winning, Oscar-nominated scriptwriter. Her father is an Emmy-nominated director, her grandmother is a doctor and Eric Foner, her mother's first husband, is an acclaimed historian at Columbia, the college she attended.
Was invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) after the 2004 Academy Awards.
Her mother is good friends, and was once the mentor of, Laurie Collyer who wrote Sherrybaby (2006) (aka "Shall Not Want"), in which Maggie stars.
Graduated Harvard-Westlake (private) high school in North Hollywood, California.
Ranked as #58 in FHM's "100 Sexiest Women in the World 2005" special supplement. (2005)
Met her fiancé at a dinner party.
She and brother, Jake Gyllenhaal, attended Camp Walt Whitman, an outdoors summer camp in Western New Hampshire.
Loves musicals.
Quit smoking.
Her favorite actress is Gena Rowlands.
Maggie's father has English, Swedish, Swiss-German, German, and distant Welsh and French, ancestry. Maggie's mother's family is Jewish (from Poland and Latvia).
Was member of the dramatic jury at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004.
Her publicist is Amanda Silverman.
Was in consideration for the role of Joyce Lakeland in The Killer Inside Me (2010), but Jessica Alba was cast instead.
She and brother Jake Gyllenhaal are the first brother and sister to be Oscar-nominated in the 21st century.
Fan of T Bone Burnett.
Good friend of Emma Thompson.
Gave birth to her 1st child at age 28, a daughter Ramona Sarsgaard on October 3, 2006. Child's father is her boyfriend [now husband], Peter Sarsgaard.
Gave birth to her 2nd child at age 34, a daughter Gloria Ray Sarsgaard on April 19, 2012. Child's father is her husband, Peter Sarsgaard.
Returned to work 6 months after giving birth to her daughter Ramona in order to begin filming The Dark Knight (2008).
Was 6 months pregnant with her daughter Gloria when she completed filming The Corrections (2012).
Returned to work 4 months after giving birth to her daughter Gloria in order to begin filming White House Down (2013).
Lives in Brooklyn with her husband and daughter.
In an interview with The Observer newspaper in July 2014, Maggie claimed she didn't know her real name until she was 35 years old: "I needed my birth certificate, and when my dad found it, it said that my name was Margolit. It was a bit of a shock. I'd always thought my full name was Margaret - never heard of Margolit. Neither of my parents can remember how it got on the birth certificate.".

Personal Quotes (26)

I do seem to have a bit of a predilection for movies that say something transgressive.
It's my responsibility to see what we can move and change about these old-school feminist mantras.
I find myself more and more interested only in roles which move the world forward.
You're invited to tons of parties, and you'll wear these shoes and that dress, and it can be enticing, but I think it also sucks you dry. If you do it a little, sure, it's fun, but too much and you start to lose your footing.
Someone asked me why I didn't do teen movies or action movies, but I'm not interested in them.
With everything I work on, I want to be put in a position that I have to be brave to do the project.
These past couple of years have been about learning to not sabotage myself in a subtler way - for instance, even just by putting moisturiser on when I get out of the shower. Learning to honour myself and believing that I'm worth taking care of.
I really hated charm school. I guess I'm just a little bit bad.
There is a need, especially right now in America, to be a bit provocative.
I want roles that challenge people to question where they are in life.
(While promoting Mona Lisa Smile (2003)) "I've realised that the only way to make movies that you're proud of, that don't fall into the sentimental bullshit that so many movies fall into, is to fight. You have to fight. So many people are willing to sleepwalk through things and fall into the not human, not interesting choice".
(On doing Homebody/Kabul) "To get people emotionally involved in something intellectual and political is important."
I didn't act the way little kids do, I threw my whole self into it.
(About being the youngest actress on her film Casa de los babys (2003)) "I felt out of place and not listened to".
(On her new film Strip Search (2004)) "I think it's important to see. It's a real violation, and it forces people to get emotionally involved in something that's intellectual and political".
(referring to when she started acting) "Even in elementary school, I took it really seriously. I was always doing plays."
There are two ways to be cool: One is to be disinterested and make it seem like you must be doing something much more interesting than everybody else if you are this disinterested. The other is to be extremely interested. You are not trying to please anyone, but you are really invested are really focused.
I just want to support these films and be a part of them in any way because they are so provocative and interesting.
I don't think it is the narrative necessarily that is the most important thing I think it is the human interaction that is the most important thing.
I do see things sometimes that are good, but they don't feel like a challenge to me personally. Like, in my own life and so often I think the things that excite me are things that feel a little bit beyond my grasp.
I am looking for movies that are actually about something and that are questioning something. Movies that are provocative in some way and I am also looking for roles that I think will force me to grow or learn something about myself or the world in order to play them well.
When I started making movies, I didn't care if anybody saw them. And now I realize I don't want to make movies for the ten people that feel the same way about the world that I do! I want to make movies that people see.
(Comments at the Tribeca premiere about The Great New Wonderful (2005)) I think America has done reprehensible things and is responsible in some way and so I think the delicacy with which it's dealt [in the film] allows that to sort of creep in.
Once you're a mom, there are secret things you know - like in your pocket, you'll find a bag of Cheerios.
I almost never have me time. That's the truth. When I have a morning to myself, I'll get a manicure or a bikini wax or I'll try to exercise. If I can go for a run, it changes my whole life!
[on her view of the Israeli-Palestininian conflict] What I've been doing is trying to read as much as I can and to think and feel each day what my position is..At the moment, I feel like the show I made ['The Honorable Woman'] ...does articulate beautifully so many things I feel, and I'm trying to keep my personal politics out of the press. I do believe in the possibility of reconciliation.

Salary (1)

World Trade Center (2006) $500,000

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