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1-20 of 31 items from 2013   « Prev | Next »


TV highlights 04/10/2013

3 October 2013 11:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Gymnastics: World Artistic Championships | Unreported World | Marvel's Agents Of Shield | Glee | Orangutans: The Great Ape Escape – Natural World | Elton John In Concert | The Blacklist | Citizen Khan

Gymnastics: World Artistic Championships

7pm, BBC3

Matt Baker introduces live coverage of the women's all-around final from Antwerp, as the top 24 qualifiers take turns making the impossible look easy on floor, beam, vault and uneven bars. It's good to see BBC3 giving proper space to this event, whose participants deserve better than a round of applause every Olympics or so. Russian Aliya Mustafina is favourite, but America's Simone Biles will provide stern competition. Beth Tweddle and Louis Smith provide analysis. Andrew Mueller

Unreported World

7.30pm, Channel 4

Channel 4's reportage programme returns for a new series. Krishnan Guru-Murthy reports from Afghanistan, documenting harrowing tales of women who are in hiding from abusive husbands and families. Amid claims that women's rights would be a legacy of the west's intervention, »

- Andrew Mueller, Martin Skegg, Gwilym Mumford, Hannah Verdier, Jonathan Wright, David Stubbs, Julia Raeside, Bim Adewunmi

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Hawking opens Cambridge fest

20 September 2013 9:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Professor Stephen Hawking helped launch the Cambridge Film Festival with a Q&A broadcast to 70 cinemas nationwide and messages from Sir Richard Branson, Morgan Freeman and the cast of The Big Bang Theory.

The 33rd Cambridge Film Festival (Cff) opened last night [Sept 19] with a special gala screening of Hawking presented by the documentary’s subject, Professor Stephen Hawking.

The gala Q&A was broadcast live by Vertigo Films to 70 Picturehouse, Everyman, Empire, Vue and independent cinemas across the UK and Ireland after the screening of the film, making it the first Cff event to have a live Q&A broadcast nationwide.

The film about the life and work of the world’s most famous living scientist is told in Hawking’s own words and by those closest to him.

Special guests at the opening night gala included his sister Dr. Mary Hawking: physicist Kip Thorne; Walt Woltosz, the founder of Word+ who developed the computer software »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Hawking opens Cambridge Film Festival

20 September 2013 9:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Professor Stephen Hawking helped launch the Cambridge Film Festival with a Q&A broadcast to 70 cinemas nationwide and messages from Sir Richard Branson, Morgan Freeman and the cast of The Big Bang Theory.

The 33rd Cambridge Film Festival (Cff) opened last night [Sept 19] with a special gala screening of Hawking presented by the documentary’s subject, Professor Stephen Hawking.

The gala Q&A was broadcast live by Vertigo Films to 70 Picturehouse, Everyman, Empire, Vue and independent cinemas across the UK and Ireland after the screening of the film, making it the first Cff event to have a live Q&A broadcast nationwide.

The film about the life and work of the world’s most famous living scientist is told in Hawking’s own words and by those closest to him.

Special guests at the opening night gala included his sister Dr. Mary Hawking: physicist Kip Thorne; Walt Woltosz, the founder of Word+ who developed the computer software »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Sir David Frost dies: David Cameron leads tributes

1 September 2013 4:26 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Sir David Frost died yesterday (August 31) after suffering a suspected heart attack on board the Queen Elizabeth cruise ship.

Following news of the 74-year-old's death, his friends and colleagues - from fellow journalists to politicians - have paid tribute to the esteemed broadcaster.

My heart goes out to David Frost's family. He could be - and certainly was with me - both a friend and a fearsome interviewer.

— David Cameron (@David_Cameron) September 1, 2013

Rip David Frost. Met the man for the first time at the Ashes test at Lord's. What a legend.

Russell Crowe (@russellcrowe) September 1, 2013

Frostie was a Giant to me in an industry now full of Pygmies.Broadcasting will never see his like again.The.King of versatility

Eamonn Holmes (@EamonnHolmes) September 1, 2013

Oh heavens, David Frost dead? No!! I only spoke to him on Friday and he sounded so well. Excited about a house move, full of »

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Hollywood and movie violence debate: Where do the filmmakers stand?

25 June 2013 4:35 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Jim Carrey's decision to withdraw his support for Kick-Ass 2 following the shooting at Sandy Hook elementary school last year has re-opened an old debate that's been around in Hollywood for decades. That is, do violent acts depicted on screen have a direct influence on reality? Carrey's decision to make a stand against screen violence (he is a staunch advocate of gun control) is admirable, even if the timing of his announcement seems odd.

The debate last surfaced around the release of Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino's blood-soaked western that arrived at the time of the Sandy Hook tragedy. The film's star Jamie Foxx said at the time: "We cannot turn our back and say that violence in films or anything that we do doesn't have a sort of influence. It does."

These views sit in direct contrast with those of Foxx's director Tarantino, who before his now-infamous "shut »

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TV highlights 24/05/2013

23 May 2013 10:59 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Life of Crime | Unreported World | Thomas Cromwell: Henry VIII's Enforcer | World's Craziest Weddings | After Newton: Guns in America | Da Vinci's Demons | Cricket: England v New Zealand

Life of Crime

9pm, ITV

In the final part of the crime drama it's now 2013 – not that any of the characters look like they've aged much – and Dci Denise Woods is on the up, interviewing for promotion. But when a girl is murdered it appears Woods's unknown nemesis is at work again; and so, despite jeopardising her career, she unofficially continues the case. Disappointingly, it all becomes somewhat incredulous and there's a dull, cliched finale; villains need to learn not to talk so much, even if it does tie the plot together. Martin Skegg

Unreported World

7.30pm, Channel 4

When he was 16, lawyer Hafedh Ibrahim was sentenced to death in Yemen as a result of a miscarriage of justice. His execution was cancelled »

- Martin Skegg, Jonathan Wright, John Robinson, Bim Adewunmi, Andrew Mueller, Julia Raeside, David Stubbs

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The 10 Best Junket Interviews Ever

7 March 2013 3:00 PM, PST | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

It's a fact of life for an actor/writer/director after doing a movie: Just before the film debuts, you meet with the press and answer questions like, "What was it like to work with Matthew Modine?" and "Before playing a mime, did you meet with any mimes to prepare?" It's a part of the biz, so to speak, and the process is generally unremarkable.

Except when it isn't. Whether the interview becomes awkward, hilarious, charming or weird, it also always becomes magical, as we saw when the Internet exploded this week over Mila Kunis's playful flirtation with a quirky British chap.

Here are the 10 best examples of said junket magic. (You may notice a lack of "Between Two Ferns," which could take up half the list, but we consider those more as "skits" than actual press interviews.)

10. Quentin Tarantino Shuts a Butt Down

 

Here is an increasingly testy »

- Nick Blake

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Netflix's House of Cards 'should be making TV industry shit it'

8 February 2013 10:13 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Top producer Peter Kosminsky says arrival of online service represents 'end of an era' for traditional model of broadcasting

Veteran drama producer and director Peter Kosminsky believes that traditional UK broadcasters ought to be "shitting it" about the arrival of online provider Netflix, which he says represents the "end of an era" for the traditional model of broadcasting content.

The Bafta-award winner revealed at a TV industry event earlier this week that he watched the Netflix launch of the Kevin Spacey political drama House of Cards last Friday and realised that the age of linear TV was doomed.

"I stayed up and watched three episodes in a row and I realised that I was watching the end of an era," he said of the House of Cards online launch, which bypassed traditional TV networks by premiering the whole 13-part series at once.

"This was something that was nothing to do with traditional broadcasting, »

- Ben Dowell

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All that bloody mayhem and we're still supposed to take Django Unchained seriously? | Ian Jack

25 January 2013 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bang-bang-bang, spatter-spatter-spatter goes Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained. At least no horses were harmed

One of my favourite Gary Larson cartoons shows an audience of ketchup bottles sitting in a cinema watching a film that, naturally, stars bottles of ketchup. It seems to be a violent kind of film. On screen, one bottle lies smashed and bleeding red pulp all over the street, while another looks on, numb with horror. "Don't worry, Jimmy," a big ketchup bottle in the audience is telling a smaller one, possibly his son, "they're just actors – and that's not real ketchup."

The original version of this advice is worth heeding if, as a human being, you are watching other human beings in a film directed by Quentin Tarantino. Bullets rip into flesh, which flies out in messy chunks as blood spatters walls and falls like crimson rain on nicely arranged white flowers – on and on it goes, »

- Ian Jack

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John Jarratt on Django Unchained, on-screen violence and Tarantino

20 January 2013 11:18 PM, PST | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

John Jarratt (left) with Michael Parks in Django Unchained.

Quentin Tarantino's western Django Unchained has quickly become the director's highest-ever grossing film.at the Us box office despite a wave of controversy centred on its depiction of slavery and violence. Actor John Jarratt, who appears briefly in the film as an Australian slave trader,.knew.early on.

.I read it and I knew it was fantastic," says the actor, who.is currently filming Wolf Creek 2 in South Australia.."I knew this was going to be as big, if not bigger than Pulp Fiction. He.s really nailed it."

The film has grossed $US129.1 million after three weeks, slightly ahead of Nazi film Inglourious Basterds' $US120.54m total (however Pulp Fiction would still be number one if adjusted for inflation).

Django Unchained,.which follows bounty hunter Schultz (Christoph Waltz) and former slave Django (Jamie Foxx) as they attempt to rescue Django's wife, »

- Brendan Swift

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Jonathan Romney on Django Unchained: It's good, then it's bad. Well, it is Tarantino

20 January 2013 | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

You know you've started a controversy – a proper old-fashioned Straw Dogs-y hoo-hah – when your film is attacked by people who refuse to see it. That's the case with Quentin Tarantino's slavery-themed Western Django Unchained, which Spike Lee has boycotted on the grounds that it's disrespectful to black American history. But the other, more familiar controversy surrounding Django concerns its violence – a subject Tarantino seems to be weary of after all these years. Raise the topic with him, as Krishnan Guru-Murthy did on Channel 4, and you risk "getting your butt shut down" – to use a now-popular Quentinism. Few people – interviewers, producers or editors – have ever managed to shut down Tarantino's verbally effusive butt, and arguably the most excessive element of Django is neither the graphic depiction of slavery's abuses nor the copious bloodshed, but the endless blather. »

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Django Unchained triumphs as highest grossing Tarantino film in Us

18 January 2013 3:56 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Slave-revenge western takes Tarantino top spot, despite opposition from prominent African Americans such as Spike Lee

As Quentin Tarantino's violent blaxploitation western Django Unchained is released across Europe, Asia and South America this week, the latest box office figures from the Us reveal that it has already overtaken Inglourious Basterds to become Tarantino's highest grossing film to date in North America.

After three weeks on release, Django has now taken $129.1m, pulling ahead of Basterds' $120.54m lifetime total. However, Django has some way to go to surpass Basterds' non-us take of $200.91m as it is only beginning its global rollout. Both films, though, are still well behind Tarantino's 1994 hit Pulp Fiction in terms of popularity: figures adjusted for ticket price inflation show that Pulp Fiction would have scored $197.51m if released today.

Django's success comes despite a string of attacks from high-profile African Americans accusing Tarantino of a lack of sensitivity over slavery-related issues. »

- Andrew Pulver

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Quentin Tarantino throws fruit at interviewer in comedy re-edit - video

16 January 2013 7:09 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

A comedic re-edit of Quentin Tarantino's recent interview with Channel 4 News has been created for Conan O'Brien Presents. The now-infamous interview took place last week, and saw Tarantino become increasingly angry with interviewer Krishnan Guru-Murthy as he was questioned about on-screen violence. A re-edited parody of the interview aired on Conan this week, and appeared to show Tarantino throwing fruit at Guru-Murphy before hitting him repeatedly in the face with a guitar. Guru-Murphy acknowledged the parody himself via Twitter, writing: "This isn't quite how I (more) »

- By Emma Dibdin

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Tarantino will only shoot from the hip if he's got something to promote

12 January 2013 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Django Unchained director's lack of interest in the gun-control debate was typical of a broadcasting culture where marketing always seems to come first

You may admire Krishnan Guru-Murthy's dogged Channel 4 News pursuit of Quentin Tarantino over movie gun violence, but you must also pause over Tarantino's grumpy response. I'm not here to debate all this Newtown stuff, snarled the would-be director of Kill Krish 1. "I'm here to sell my movie." And that, in TV world, is the gospel, all-pervasive truth. You have something – a movie, a record, even a new TV show – to sell, and cameras roll in the most unlikely newsroom places. Once upon a distant, Reithian time, public service broadcasting meant never plugging anything explicitly. Now chat show after show from Graham Norton on down arrives stiff with non-subliminal ads and one old refrain is never heard. Why am I here debating all this tedious stuff? »

- Peter Preston

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Quentin Tarantino Shuts Down Interviewer When Questioned On Movie Violence

11 January 2013 4:05 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Quentin Tarantino has been forced to the forefront of the discussion of violence in cinema pretty much since he broke onto the scene with Reservoir Dogs in 1992. And whether he has a new movie, or there's a very public tragedy involving gun violence, or both, his name has been dragged through the discussion, clips from his movies have been flashed as examples of heinous movie violence, and value and impact of his work has again and again been called into question. After twenty-five years of this, Tarantino has had enough. So, when Channel 4 News interviewer Krishnan Guru-Murthy sat down with Tarantino to discuss Django Unchained, which has just been nominated for five Academy Awards including Best Picture, the filmmaker, who has never been shy about sharing a piece of his mind, snapped. Check out their heated exchange below thanks to a tip from Vulture. Tarantino states: "I don't want »

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Quentin Tarantino Rips Reporter: 'I'm Not Your Slave'

11 January 2013 12:15 PM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Quentin Tarantino lashed out at an interviewer on England's Channel 4 yesterday when the reporter, Krishnan Guru-Murthy, tried to ask the director why he was sure there's no link between violence in movies and in real life. "Don't ask me a question like that – I'm not biting. I refuse your question," Tarantino said. 

When Guru-Murthy asked why the Django Unchained director wouldn't answer, a visibly peeved Tarantino responded: "Because I refuse your question. I'm not your slave and you're not my master. You can't make me dance to your tune. »

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Quentin Tarantino Is Sick Of Talking About The Violence In Django Unchained

11 January 2013 11:38 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Advice to anyone who may be interviewing Quentin Tarantino about Django Unchained: Ask him about slavery, Not Violence.

It seems like discussing the violence in his movies, especially in the wake of the incredibly violent Django Unchained, would be a logical thing to do considering the tumultuous state of the media industry in relation to the violent mass-murders in the last year. However, Tarantino made it very clear to one reporter that he has said his part about violence, and he’s done talking about it.

After some pleasant talk with reporter Krishnan Guru-Murthy about the effects the film has had on America’s acknowledgement of slavery, the reporter threw in a question regarding why Tarantino likes making violent movies. The dialogue started civil enough, with Tarantino comparing that question to asking Judd Apatow why he likes making comedies, and saying that the reason, at its most basic, is »

- Alex Lowe

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Quentin Tarantino: after Sandy Hook, has America lost its appetite for blood and guts?

11 January 2013 11:24 AM, PST | The Independent | See recent The Independent news »

Uh-oh. Who's that riding into town, with an expression of gleeful menace on his face, and all the little boys running after him in hero worship? It's Quentin Tarantino, the troublemaker, the connoisseur of badassery, the Billy the Kid of modern film-making. The former enfant terrible will turn 50 this March, but he refuses to toe the line, account for his attitudes, or justify his movie excesses. As Krishnan Guru-Murthy, the Channel 4 news presenter, found out on Thursday evening. »

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Tarantino Goes Cray Cray Over Gun Violence Question

11 January 2013 10:26 AM, PST | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

Quentin Tarantino has always been, err, eccentric. Known for his blood-splattering violent movies and colorful dialogue, the director has somewhat established himself as the king of witty gore (yes, we just coined that phrase). His latest, the Oscar-nominated "Django Unchained," is no different—but his answers to some seemingly fair-game questions certainly are.

During a sit-down interview with Krishnan Guru-Murthy (posted below courtesy of YouTube), Tarantino got visibly irritated as the British journalist tried to start a dialogue about the violence and gunplay in the film.

It all started to go south when Guru-Murthy asked, "Why do you like making violent movies?" And Tarantino shot back, "It's like asking Judd Apatow, 'Why do you like making comedies?'… It is cathartic violence."

But when Guru-Murthy pressed on, asking, "Why are you so sure that there's no link between enjoying movie violence and enjoying real violence?" the director snapped, "I refuse your question. »

- Elizabeth Durand

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Quentin Tarantino Explodes at Reporter -- Don't Ask Me About Movie Violence!!!

11 January 2013 8:37 AM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Quentin Tarantino says he's sick and tired of talking about the connection between movie violence and real violence ... and Erupted on a British news reporter who asked about it during an interview about "Django Unchained." Tarantino was sitting down with Krishnan Guru-Murthy -- a self-proclaimed "fan" of Q's movies -- when he asked, "Why are you so sure that there's no link between enjoying movie violence and enjoying real violence?"A flustered Tarantino replied,  "Don't »

- TMZ Staff

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