Tammy Grimes - News Poster

News

Girl, where do you link you're goin'?

Comics Alliance The Flash movie, starring Ezra Miller, loses its Dope director

Mnpp Matthias Schoenaerts and Jane Fonda on set together!

The New York on The Handmaiden and lesbian historical fiction

EW will give us an extensive first look at Beauty and the Beast in the new issue

The Film Doctor on Woody Allen's Cafe Society - have you caught up with this on dvd?

i09 because once you are all about being on-brand, like Johnny Depp, you can't ever leave franchise-verse, he'll be joining the Potterverse for a Fantastic Beasts sequel

/Film speaking of Ezra Miller is giving a history of the Potterverse to promote Fantastic Beasts

Time Out Two time Tony winner Tammy Grimes (mother of Amanda Plummer) dies at 92

D List after a brief internet freakout Idris Elba denies that he's dating Madonna

Superhero Hype set photos from The Defenders (Netflix's answer to The Avengers) though
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Stuff

Forget Caltiki and forget The Blob: 'The Stuff' doesn't eat you, you eat it! Larry Cohen takes a page from Professor Quatermass for this satirical slap at blind consumerism and unregulated commerce, in a thriller packed with ooky glob-monsters and people hollowed out like Halloween pumpkins. It's the smart side of '80s sci-fi: Cohen knows how to make the genre sustain his anti-establishment themes. The Stuff Blu-ray Arrow Video (Us) 1985 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 87 min. / Street Date April 19, 2016 / Available from Amazon / 39.95 Starring Michael Moriarty, Andrea Marcovicci, Garrett Morris, Paul Sorvino, Scott Bloom, Danny Aiello, Patrick O'Neal, Alexander Scourby, Harry Bellaver, Rutanya Alda, Brooke Adams, Laurene Landon, Tammy Grimes, Abe Vigoda, Clara Peller, Patrick Dempsey, Mira Sorvino, Eric Bogosian. Cinematography Paul Glickman Makeup Effects Ed French, Michael Maddi, Steve Neill, Kim Robinson, Rick Stratton, Craig Lyman Editor Armond Lebowitz Original Music Anthony Guefen Produced by Paul Kurta Written and
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Photo Coverage: Luba Mason, Lee Roy Reams and More Perform at Love N' Courage Gala

The two-time Tony Award-winning actress Tammy Grimes Private Lives, The Unsinkable Molly Brown and composer David Amram scores for the films Splendor In The Grass and The Manchurian Candidate were just honored at Theater for the New City's 12th annual Love 'N Courage evening. An annual event that benefits Tnc's Emerging Playwrights Program, this year's Love 'N Courage event was hosted by Phoebe Legere and Matt Morillo and featured performances by Ms. Grimes, Mr. Amram, Vinie Burrows, Judy Gorman, Yip Harburg Foundation's Rainbow Troupe, Luba Mason, Human Kinetics Movement Arts, and The Love Show, along with select excerpts from plays by Andrea Fulton, Georges Bizet, Daniel Catan and Seymour Barab.BroadwayWorld brings you photos from the performances below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Photo Coverage: Inside Theatre for the New City's 12th Annual Love N' Courage Gala

The two-time Tony Award-winning actress Tammy Grimes Private Lives, The Unsinkable Molly Brown and composer David Amram scores for the films Splendor In The Grass and The Manchurian Candidate were just honored at Theater for the New City's 12th annual Love 'N Courage evening. An annual event that benefits Tnc's Emerging Playwrights Program, this year's Love 'N Courage event was hosted by Phoebe Legere and Matt Morillo and featured performances by Ms. Grimes, Mr. Amram, Vinie Burrows, Judy Gorman, Yip Harburg Foundation's Rainbow Troupe, Luba Mason, Human Kinetics Movement Arts, and The Love Show, along with select excerpts from plays by Andrea Fulton, Georges Bizet, Daniel Catan and Seymour Barab.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Photo Coverage: Theater for the New City Celebrates Mario Fratti at Love 'N Courage Benefit

Just last night, Theater for the New City paid tribute to the playwright and theater critic Mario Fratti whose adaptation of the Federico Fellini film 8 became the Broadway musical Nine at the 11th annual Love 'N Courage benefit at the National Arts Club 15 Gramercy Park South in New York City. An annual evening to benefit Tnc's Emerging Playwrights Program, this year's Love 'N Courage event featured appearances by Liliane Montevecchi, Oscar winner F. Murray Abraham, two-time Tony winner Tammy Grimes accompanied by Alex Rybeck, singer Anna Bergman accompanied by William Hicks, Austin Pendleton, Katharine Cullison, cabaret star KT Sullivan, Inma Heredia, Human Kinetics Movement Arts, Rachel Klein Dance Company, Jocab Merrick Storms, the Yip Harburg Foundation Rainbow Troupe, and Michael-David Gordon and Tnc's Street Theater Company.BroadwayWorld was there for the special night and you can check out photo coverage below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Blu-ray Release: The Only Game in Town

Blu-ray Release Date: June 11, 2013

Price: Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Twilight Time

Elizabeth Taylor and Warren Beatty become uneasy lovers in The Only Game in Town.

Elizabeth Taylor (Cleopatra) and Warren Beatty (Ishtar) star in filmmaker George Stevens’ final movie, the 1970 drama-romance film The Only Game in Town.

Taylor stars as an aging and exhausted showgirl fed up with waiting for her married lover (Charles Braswell) to divorce his wife, while Beatty portrays a piano-playing gambling addict who keeps compulsively losing the stake he needs to high-tail it to New York. Together, they parlay an instant attraction into a mutual effort to get their lives together—no strings attached.

Written by Frank D. Gilroy, who adapted his own Las Vegas-set stage play, The Only Game in Town was gorgeously shot by French New Wave stalwart Henri Decaë (known for his work with Jean-Pierre Melville and Claude Chabrol) and scored by the great Maurice Jarre
See full article at Disc Dish »

Photo Coverage: Theater for the New City Gala Honors Charles Busch

The Pulitzer Prize and Obie Award-winning Theatre for the New City Tnc held its 10th Annual Love 'N' Courage benefit gala last night, February 25, 2013 at the National Arts Club 15 Gramercy Park South in Manhattan, this year honoring award-winning actor and playwright Charles Busch. Hosts for Love 'N' Courage were composer and singer Phoebe Legere and playwrightfilmmaker Matt Morillo 'Maid of Honor'. The performers at this year's show included Mr. Busch, The Love Show, dancerchoreographer Kitty Lunn and Infinity Dance, juggler supreme John Grimaldi, Carol Freeman, Luba Mason, KT Sullivan, Tammy Grimes, Drew Pulver, Mark Marcante and Crystal Field.BroadwayWorld was there for the celebration and you can check out full photo coverage below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Blu Monday: Tarantino Paradiso & The Animation Factory

Your Weekly Source for the Newest Releases to Blu-Ray Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

‘Twas The Night Before Christmas: 2-Disc Deluxe Edition (1974)

Synopsis: For some unexplained reason, letters to Santa Claus are being returned to the children of Junctionville. It seems some resident has angered St. Nick by calling him “a fraudulent myth!” Skeptical Albert Mouse has to be brought to his senses “and let up a little on the wonder why.” How Albert is persuaded to change his tune paves the way for Santa’s jolly return to town – and the joyous finale of the animated fable inspired by Clement Moore’s poem and produced by the merrymaking conjures of Rankin/bass studios. The voice talents of Joel grey, Tammy Grimes, John McGiver and George Gobel make this festive fable even more fun. (highdefdigest.com)

Special Features:

Tba

The 12 Dogs Of Christmas (2005)

Synopsis: A girl who uses dogs to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

[DVD Review] The Last Unicorn

Like many children's films of its era, The Last Unicorn has spawned a fan-base that straddles the line between the cult and the nostalgic, occupying the center of a Venn diagram probably inseparable from either. Also like many of those films, it’s technically dodgy, filled with creepy images, and defined as a children's film only by the fact that its subject matter is either too illogical or nonsensical for adults. Unicorn was produced during the only period in our history when something like this could be produced (it also gave us Labyrinth, The Dark Crystal, and Legend), which explains, in a way, the affection that people have for it, as it seems to preserve not merely childhood memories, but an entirely mortal period of time when Hollywood placed its hope in fantasy film in a way that it really hasn’t before or since (Lord of the Rings is an arguable case,
See full article at JustPressPlay »

First-Nighter: Tammy Grimes Remains Unsinkable at The Metropolitan Room

First-Nighter: Tammy Grimes Remains Unsinkable at The Metropolitan Room
It's important for me to keep things in perspective when writing about Tammy Grimes, who's just finishing up a week-long engagement at Manhattan's Metropolitan Room. (She does one more or less annually.) After all, she's 76 now (born January 30, 1934) and not the performer she was when she first came to New York and, thanks to friend Roddy McDowell's Noel Coward introduction, was picked by the master for his upcoming Look After Lulu production and subsequently was tapped for the star-making title role in Meredith Willson's Unsinkable Molly Brown. That was then. This is now, 2010. Grimes's once irresistibly plummy voice is frayed like a not particularly well-cared-for Aubusson rug. The sustained notes wobble. The high notes are frequently bleats. She reads her patter from a script, apparently...
See full article at Huffington Post »

42nd Street Moon Presents High Spirits Opening 3/21

42nd Street Moon proudly presents High Spirits, the musical version of Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit, opening March 21 and running through April 12 at the Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson Street in San Francisco. As previously announced, it replaces The Baker's Wife, which will be presented next season. High Spirits, with a book, lyrics and music by Hugh Martin and Timothy Gray, adheres closely to Coward's original text, which was about a man who is haunted by the mischievous spirit of his dead wife. The playwright was delighted with the adaptation, and agreed to direct the Broadway show, which starred Edward Woodward, Louise Troy, Tammy Grimes and Beatrice Lillie. The show garnered eight Tony nominations in 1964, and proved to be Ms. Lillie's final Broadway appearance.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Tammy Grimes & Marian Seldes Join Author David Sheward to Discuss George C. Scott Feb. 3

George C. Scott created some of the 20th century's most memorable performances on stage and screen-the cunning prosecutor in Anatomy of a Murder, the manipulative gambler in The Hustler, the buffoonishly warmongering chief of staff in Dr. Strangelove, and, of course, the brilliant and rebellious Patton. He also played Willy Loman, Richard III, Mussolini, Scrooge, Fagin, and countless others. But his offstage life was as filled with drama and controversy as any of the lives he portrayed with such intensity. He refused the Oscar for Patton, battled with TV networks to include realistic elements in his series "East Side/West Side," invested (and lost) his own money on Broadway and in the scandalous film The Savage Is Loose, married five times (twice to Colleen Dewhurst) and had a tempestuous affair with Ava Gardner, traveled to Vietnam at the height of the war to write an article for Esquire, and weathered a damaging sexual harassment suit.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Film review:'Trouble on the Corner'

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The jury may still be out on Alan Madison's filmmaking abilities, but the writer-director demonstrates one undeniable talent in his extremely low-budget debut feature -- the knack for attracting some of the best actors on the indie scene for a film that probably paid them next-to-nothing.

The star of this effort about an increasingly disturbed psychologist is Tony Goldwyn (who is also going nuts in Paramount's "Kiss the Girls"), and the supporting cast includes -- count 'em -- Giancarlo Esposito, Joe Morton, Debi Mazar, Anna Thomson and Edie Falco, as well as New York theater stalwarts Charles Busch, Tammy Grimes and Roger Rees, among others. The film was recently on display at the Fort Lauderdale Film Festival.

Unfortunately, this stellar group is more likely than not to regret its generosity, since "Trouble on the Corner" fails to live up to its admirable goal of being a New York-based, paranoid, black-comic thriller. The filmmaker displays a definite imagination and flashes of wit, but this first effort simply doesn't have the style it needs to get its ambitious goals across.

Goldwyn plays Jeff, a therapist who works in his run-down apartment building. Many of his patients, whom he charges a quite-reasonable $35 an hour, are his friends and neighbors, and his specialty is sexual problems. His patients include a compulsive child molester (Bruce MacVittie), the neighborhood butcher's sexually frustrated wife (Thomson) and a gorgeous hand model (Mazar) who keeps her prized assets permanently hidden beneath gloves.

Other assorted, weird characters who Jeff keeps running into include a busybody neighbor (Grimes) who hasn't thrown out a newspaper since her husband died, a drag-queen tarot-card reader (Busch) and a lawyer (Rees) who seems to be perpetually walking his dogs.

Jeff isn't exactly in a happy marriage, since his bath-obsessed wife does little more than grumble and complain when she gets home from a hard day's work as a nurse. She's certainly not interested in sex, but will grudgingly get Jeff off manually if he's feeling particularly frustrated ("Oh, my, what a mess", she comments after his cry of relief). Is it any wonder that, when a hole in his bathroom ceiling offers tantalizing glimpses of his hand-model patient, Jeff begins to develop an erotic fixation on her?

The film intends to chronicle Jeff's gradual descent into madness, which manifests itself by his suddenly raising his fees and advising patients to try murder as a therapeutic technique. The problems are that clumsy filmmaking and Goldwyn's extremely recessive performance fail to clue us in sufficiently, with the result that the character seems to snap suddenly. Not helping matters are the film's lackadaisical pacing, often-awkward dialogue and general lack of structure. These factors could have been overlooked if the individual vignettes or characterizations were more interesting, but they are more bizarre than entertaining.

The performers clearly enjoy their opportunities to play some colorful characters, but their efforts are undermined by the film's overreliance on shtick. When Goldwyn finally does go on his killing spree, he seems less disturbed than just really, really cranky, and the film concludes with an over-the-top, silly denouement in which the patients join forces to get revenge on their shrink.

Tech credits, including photography and sound, reflect the film's meager budget.

TROUBLE ON THE CORNER

Trouble on the Corner Llc.

Director-screenwriter: Alan Madison

Producers: Alan Madison, Diane Kolyer

Executive producers: Henry Eisenberg, Glenn Krevlin, Lee Schalop, Dan Stern

Cinematography: Phil Abraham

Editor: Ray Hubley

Music: Robert Een

Color/mono

Cast:

Jeff Stewart: Tony Goldwyn

Vivian Stewart: Edie Falco

Ericca Ricce: Debi Mazar

Detective Bill: Joe Morton

Mr. McMurtry: Roger Rees

Butcher's Wife: Anna Thomson

Sandy: Bruce MacVittie

Daryl: Giancarlo Esposito

Running time -- 114 minutes

No MPAA rating

See also

Credited With | External Sites