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Sun Valley Film Festival Line-Up Includes ‘Finding Your Feet,’ ‘Beirut,’ ‘Leave No Trace,’ ‘Nona’

Sun Valley Film Festival Line-Up Includes ‘Finding Your Feet,’ ‘Beirut,’ ‘Leave No Trace,’ ‘Nona’
The Sun Valley Film Festival has released the line-up for this year’s event which runs March 14-18.

The documentary “Science Fair” will open the festival and “Finding Your Feet” by director Richard Loncraine will close it.

The list of films include “Beirut,” starring Jon Hamm and Rosamund Pike, as well as “Leave No Trace” directed by Debra Granik. In “Beirut,” Hamm plays a U.S. diplomat who flees Lebanon after an accident and is called back to Beirut by a CIA operative played by Pike. “Leave No Trace” follows a father and daughter who live off the grid and struggle to adapt to a new community.

Additionally, Lynn Shelton’s “Outside In” with Jay Duplass and Edie Falco, and the recent winner of the U.S. Documentary Directing Award at Sundance, “On Her Shoulders,” will be shown. The festival will mark the U.S. premiere of “Nona,” produced by Pioneer Award recipient Kate Bosworth, who also appears
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Keira Knightley-Starrer “Colette” and Debra Granik’s “Leave No Trace” Get Release Dates

“Colette”

Two films to score distribution out of Sundance 2018 have received release dates, Keira Knightley-starrer “Colette” and Debra Granik’s father-daughter story “Leave No Trace. ” Bleecker Street acquired both titles, and teamed up with 30West for the former in one of the fest’s biggest sales.

Based on a true story, “Colette” sees Knightley playing a famed, Nobel Prize-nominated French novelist whose work wasn’t originally published under her name. Her husband insisted that he get the credit she was entitled to. Two-time Oscar nominee Knightley received excellent reviews for the period pic, which will open in limited release September 21.

Set in the remote Oregon woods, “Leave No Trace” is a character study that follows a teen girl and her father. The pair’s off-the-grid lifestyle comes to a halt when they’re discovered by authorities and questioned by social workers. The drama hits theaters in limited release June
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Bleecker Street Dates Its Big Sundance Buy ‘Colette’, ‘Papillon’ & More

Bleecker Street Dates Its Big Sundance Buy ‘Colette’, ‘Papillon’ & More
Bleecker Street said today that its Keira Knightley-starring Colette, which it acquired with 30West at the Sundance Film Festival this year in a big mid-seven figure U.S. rights deal, will hit screens in limited release September 21. It is one of several 2018 release dates shifted and set by the indie distributor. Also getting a date is another Sundance pickup, Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace, which will bow limited June 29. Papillon, the redo of the 1973 prison escape…
See full article at Deadline »

Bleecker Street dates 'Colette', 'Leave No Trace'

Bleecker Street dates 'Colette', 'Leave No Trace'
Bleecker Street has announced a cluster of 2018 release dates including Sundance hits Colette starring Keira Knightley, and Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace.

Bleecker Street has announced a cluster of 2018 release dates including Sundance hits Colette starring Keira Knightley, and Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace.

Bleecker Street and 30West acquired Colette shortly after its world premiere in Sundance last month and the period drama about the pioneering Parisian writer Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette gets a prime awards season slot in limited release on September 21. Wash Westmoreland he co-wrote with his late partner Richard Glatzer, and Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Leave No Trace, Debra Granik’s follow-up to Jennifer Lawrence breakout Winter’s Bone, will open in limited release on June 29 and stars Ben Foster and newcomer Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie as a father and daughter living off the grid who set out to return to their idyllic life after they are placed into social services. Bleecker Street pounced
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Movie Review – The Scent of Rain and Lightning (2017)

The Scent of Rain and Lightning, 2017.

Directed by Blake Robbins.

Starring Maika Monroe, Maggie Grace, Bonnie Bedelia, Mark Webber, and Justin Chatwin.

Synopsis:

When news reaches Jody Linder (Maika Monroe) that her parents’ killer is being released it causes a domino effect. Long buried secrets and family feuds are uncovered, proving fouler things than dead bodies lurk beneath the surface in every town.

This is a spider’s web for the unravelling. Part murder mystery, part small town melodrama and equal portions brooding psychological thriller. Director Blake Robbins does a great job in cahoots with his cast and crew of completely throwing the audience. Combining soft focus close up shots, sobering character moments with richly black scenes of shadowy passion.

In essence a whodunit with an emotional scarred heroine as sleuth, instigator and interrogator Maika Monroe’s Jody helps tie this film together. Robbins employs flashbacks judiciously and manipulates timeframe to cover ground,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Leave No Trace’ Is An Unforgettable, Universal Experience [Sundance Review]

Eight years ago, director Debra Granik along with a then unknown Jennifer Lawrence premiered “Winter’s Bone” to a stunned Sundance audience. The film would go on to garner four Oscar nominations (Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor and Best Adapted Screenplay), and Lawrence would take Hollywood by storm soon after. Meanwhile Granik, whose only other film at the time was the underrated “Down to the Bone” starring Vera Farmiga, made a major statement with that Ozarkian fable.

Continue reading ‘Leave No Trace’ Is An Unforgettable, Universal Experience [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

“I Never Saw a Shot on Anything Bigger Than a 5″ Monitor”: Dp Michael McDonough on Leave No Trace

Cinematographer Michael McDonough met director Debra Granik in 1994, when they were both enrolled at the same NYU film studies class. Leave No Trace is their third collaboration, following Down to the Bone and Winter’s Bone, and also marks Granik’s first narrative feature in the eight years following the latter. Leave No Trace follows father Will (Ben Foster) and 12-year-old daughter Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie), squatters secretly living in a forest in almost total isolation. When they’re spotted by a hiker, social workers get involved and Tom is torn from the woods, entering the social world and potential friendships for the first time. Prior to […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Female Filmmakers Dominated the Sundance Awards, But That Doesn’t Guarantee a Career Boost

Female Filmmakers Dominated the Sundance Awards, But That Doesn’t Guarantee a Career Boost
At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, the annual event broke some of its own barriers, doling out each of its four directing awards to female filmmakers. For the first time in the festival’s 34-year history, directing prizes went only to women, spanning all four major categories — narrative and documentary, U.S. and world cinema: Sara Colangelo (“The Kindergarten Teacher”), Alexandria Bombach (“On Her Shoulders”), Sandi Tan (“Shirkers”), and Isold Uggadottir (“And Breathe Normally”). The festival’s juries also awarded Desiree Akhavan’s “The Miseducation of Cameron Post” the Grand Jury Prize, the festival’s highest honor; Sundance’s sole dedicated screenplay honor, the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, went to Christina Choe for “Nancy.”

In short, it was a big festival for women. But what does winning an award at Sundance actually mean for female filmmakers? How does it impact future projects? Does it guarantee further success in the industry?
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance 2018 Oscar Wrap: The Market Is Split Between Young and Old

Sundance 2018 Oscar Wrap: The Market Is Split Between Young and Old
Ever since “In the Bedroom” in 2001, Sundance has just about always delivered a few Oscar contenders a year, especially on the documentary side. (This year’s Sundance 2017 Oscar contenders include “Get Out,” “Call Me By Your Name,” “The Big Sick,” and non-fiction nominees “Last Men in Aleppo,” “Icarus” and Strong Island.”) But just as the 2018 acquisitions market is softer than previous years, there’s also a decided rift between traditional adult arthouse fare — which distributors consider a safer bet for the expensive theatrical run that builds an Oscar contender — and movies aimed at a more diverse, younger audience. The result made the awards prospects in this year’s lineup much harder to assess.

See More:Slow Sundance Sales Bring the Festival Back to Its Roots, As Filmmakers Contemplate the Future Big Plans From New Players

However, there were plenty of schemes on display. At one dinner for rookie director Michael Pearce
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Sundance 2018 Oscar Wrap: The Market Is Split Between Young and Old

Ever since “In the Bedroom” in 2001, Sundance has just about always delivered a few Oscar contenders a year, especially on the documentary side. (This year’s Sundance 2017 Oscar contenders include “Get Out,” “Call Me By Your Name,” “The Big Sick,” and non-fiction nominees “Last Men in Aleppo,” “Icarus” and Strong Island.”) But just as the 2018 acquisitions market is softer than previous years, there’s also a decided rift between traditional adult arthouse fare — which distributors consider a safer bet for the expensive theatrical run that builds an Oscar contender — and movies aimed at a more diverse, younger audience. The result made the awards prospects in this year’s lineup much harder to assess.

See More:Slow Sundance Sales Bring the Festival Back to Its Roots, As Filmmakers Contemplate the Future Big Plans From New Players

However, there were plenty of schemes on display. At one dinner for rookie director Michael Pearce
See full article at Indiewire »

Critics Vote on the Best Movies of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival

The 2018 Sundance Film Festival wasn’t a big marketplace compared to previous editions, but critics found plenty of cinematic highlights to celebrate in this year’s lineup, regardless of how much interest they attracted from hungry buyers. IndieWire invited dozens of critics attending the festival to vote on their favorite films of the lineup, and the movie that received the most support won no awards and didn’t even land distribution before the end of the festival, but stood out as one of the most widely praised selections anyway.

Read More:The 2018 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview, and News Item Posted During the Festival

“Madeline’s Madeline,” the third feature from writer-director Josephine Decker and her first at Sundance, topped IndieWire’s annual critics survey of the top films with 15% of the vote in the Best Film category. Decker’s surreal drama, which premiered in the festival’s Next section,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Films at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival

With over 50 films viewed and more coverage coming from the Sundance Film Festival, it’s time to wrap up the first major cinema event in 2018. We already got the official jury and audience winners (here), and now it’s time to highlight our favorites.

One will find our favorites (in alphabetical order), followed by the rest of our reviews (from best to worst, including previously premiered features). Check out everything below and stay tuned to our site, and specifically Twitter, for acquisition and release-date news on the below films in the coming months.

Bisbee ’17 (Robert Greene)

Here is a story that makes Faulkner’s adage about the past not being past seem horribly valid. A hundred years ago, both the Arizona mining town of Bisbee and America itself were wracked with controversy over pointless war, hatred toward immigrants, and rampant inequality and injustice. Today, only the wars are different. In
See full article at The Film Stage »

Slow Sundance Sales Bring the Festival Back to Its Roots, As Filmmakers Contemplate the Future

Stop the presses! The latest Sundance Film Festival contained few late-night, seven-figure sales for potentially commercial movies. Clearly, something disastrous has happened to the movie industry when major companies avoided making huge business decisions within the confines of a hectic and snowy 10-day window. At least, that’s the popular narrative that a slow Sundance market tends to invite, and it’s an industry perception as a whole. As consumer habits and delivery methods continue to evolve, and the culture undergoes radical shifts in the stories it tells, both the market and the movies are moving in a million directions at once.

See More:Sundance 2018: A Slow Marketplace For Commercial Movies is Good News for a Festival Overwhelmed By Hype

There are countless reasons why only a handful of big sales happened at Sundance this year. Netflix, which closed out the 2017 edition by spending a jarring $12.5 million on “Mudbound,” faces
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News Roundup: Meryl Streep Honored by Society of Camera Operators

Film News Roundup: Meryl Streep Honored by Society of Camera Operators
In today’s film news roundup, Meryl Streep gets honored by the Society of Camera Operators, Debra Granik’s “Leave No Trace” gets sold and Oscar Issac’s “Opreation Finale” gets a release date.

Streep Honored

The Society of Camera Operators is awarding Meryl Streep its President Award for Lifetime Achievement for her body of work, and her commitment to the craft of camera operating.

The group noted that Streep has been nominated a record breaking 21 times for an Academy Award and has won three times. She received a Best Actress nomination on Jan. 23 for “The Post.”

“Ms. Streep’s successes ranging from ‘Kramer Vs. Kramer,’ ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ ‘The Devil Wears Prada,’ ‘Mamma Mia,’ ‘The Iron Lady,’ ‘Florence Foster Jenkins’ and ‘The Post,’ which can currently be seen in theaters, are examples of her expansive creative genius, and the depth and variety of her performances,” the group said.

Streep will be presented with the Lifetime Achievement
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bleecker Street Acquires Ben Foster’s ‘Leave No Trace’

  • The Wrap
Bleecker Street Acquires Ben Foster’s ‘Leave No Trace’
Bleecker Street has acquired the North American rights to Ben Foster’s “Leave No Trace” at the Sundance Film Festival, an individual with knowledge of the deal told TheWrap.

Debra Granik directed from a screenplay she wrote with Anne Rosellini, based on the novel “My Abandonment” by Peter Rock. Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie, Jeff Kober and Dale Dickey also star.

Rosellini, Anne Harrison and Linda Reisman are producers. The film had its premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival in the Premieres section.

The film follows Will (Foster) and his teenage daughter, Tom (McKenzie), who...
See full article at The Wrap »

Debra Granik’s ‘Leave No Trace’ Lands At Bleecker Street – Sundance

Debra Granik’s ‘Leave No Trace’ Lands At Bleecker Street – Sundance
Bleecker Street has acquired North American distribution rights to Debra Granik's Leave No Trace, which had its world premiere last weekend at the Sundance Film Festival. Bron Studios and Topic Studios were behind the film, which Anne Harrison, Linda Reisman and Anne Rosellini produced. Based on Peter Rock’s novel My Abandonment, the pic revolves around Will (Ben Foster) and his teenage daughter, Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie), who have lived off the grid for years in…
See full article at Deadline »

Sundance: Bleecker Street snaps up 'Leave No Trace'

Buyer lands second selection after Colette.

Bleecker Street has closed its second acquisition of Sundance, acquiring North American rights to Debra Granik’s Winter’s Bone follow-up Leave No Trace.

Granik and Anne Rosellini adapted the Premieres selection from Peter Rock’s novel My Abandonment. The drama stars Ben Foster and newcomer Harcourt McKenzie as a father and daughter living off the grid in the forests of Portland, Oregon, who embark on a journey back to their wilderness homeland when both are placed into social services.

Bron and Topic Studios backed the film, which Anne Harrison, Linda Reisman and Anne Rosellini produced.

Bleecker Street’s Kent Sanderson and Avy Eschenasy brokered the deal with Endeavor Content on behalf of the filmmakers.

Earlier in the festival Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions took all international rights to Leave No Trace excluding France.

Bleecker Street and 30West paid mid-seven figures for Wash Westmoreland’s Colette starring Keira Knightley.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Spotlight on the Stars: Ben Foster

We’re bringing back the Spotlight on the Stars series of articles folks! Today, the subject is rising star Ben Foster, a gifted actor who is finally starting to really make his mark in the industry. Still relatively young, age wise, though already a veteran actor, Foster is going from being “that guy” to the sort of intense thespian who makes anything they’re involved with significantly better. Whether it’s his breakthrough role last year in the Hell or High Water or something quieter like The Messenger, he’s just aces, plain and simple. He’ll be an A-lister before long. As such, it’s a real pleasure to fete him with this featured piece. Foster got his start on television, but made his feature debut in the teen movie Get Over It. There was also small parts in a mixed bag of studio fare too. He made his
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Sundance Deals: Betsy West and Julie Cohen’s “Rbg” Gets Distribution

Rbg

“Colette” and Debra Granik’s “Leave No Trace” are in good company. Betsy West and Julie Cohen’s Ruth Bader Ginsburg documentary “Rbg” is one of the latest flicks to get a deal at Sundance, Variety confirms. Magnolia Pictures and Participant Media acquired the project’s worldwide distribution rights, including those pertaining to theatrical release, home video, and streaming platforms. CNN Films, which produced “Rbg,” still holds U.S. broadcast rights.

“Rbg” examines Ginsburg’s lengthy career, from her early days as a lawyer to her present position on the Supreme Court. It also delves into why exactly Ginsburg is nicknamed “Notorious Rbg.” (Hint: it has to do with her being a feminist.)

Ginsburg herself appeared at “Rbg’s” Sundance premiere. In a post-screening interview with NPR’s Nina Totenberg, Ginsburg discussed the #MeToo movement. “It’s about time. For so long women were silent thinking there was nothing you could do about it,
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Leave No Trace’ Review: Debra Granik Returns With Another Tale of Families Living Off-the-Grid [Sundance]

‘Leave No Trace’ Review: Debra Granik Returns With Another Tale of Families Living Off-the-Grid [Sundance]
It’s almost impossible to believe that it’s been eight years since filmmaker Debra Granik debuted her powerful, atmospheric, four-time-Oscar-nominated Winter’s Bone at the Sundance Film Festival, where it won the Grand Jury Prize and launched the career of Jennifer Lawrence into the stratosphere. While she did follow that up with her exceptional, long-in-the-works 2014 documentary […]

The post ‘Leave No Trace’ Review: Debra Granik Returns With Another Tale of Families Living Off-the-Grid [Sundance] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »
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