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The Young Karl Marx Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Young Karl Marx Movie Review
The Young Karl Marx The Orchard Reviewed by: Harvey Karten Director: Raoul Peck Screenwriter: Pascal Bonitzer, Raoul Peck Cast: August Diehl, Stefan Konarske, Vicky Krieps, Olivier Gourmet, Michael Brander Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 2/13/18 Opens: February 23, 2018 What four people influenced our present world more than any others? The classic answer: Freud, Moses, […]

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Gaumont launches sales on film version of Alexis Michalik's hit play 'Edmond' (exclusive)

Gaumont launches sales on film version of Alexis Michalik's hit play 'Edmond' (exclusive)
Paris-set film is directorial debut from award-winning playwright Alexis Michalik.

Gaumont is launching world sales on director Alexis Michalik’s big screen adaptation of his stage hit Edmond, revolving around the writing of the world famous play Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand in 1897.

It marks the feature directorial debut of theatre director and playwright Michalik, whose award-winning play won five prestigious Moliére Awards and is currently enjoying a record-breaking run at the Théatre du Palais-Royal in Paris.

Set against the vibrant backdrop of Belle Epoque Paris, Thomas Solivérès stars as Edmond Rostand, a young playwright of potential genius, reeling from a series of flops.

Celebrity actress Sarah Bernhardt who is an admirer of his work connects him to Constant Coquelin, one of the most actors of the period, who demands the young dramatist write him a leading role in a play to premiere in three weeks.

Edmond has no idea what he is going to write but
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlinale: Studiocanal Introduces ‘One Nation, One King,’ ‘Mia and the White Lion’ (Exclusive)

Studiocanal, the film-tv production-distribution affiliate of Vivendi’s Canal Plus Group, will bring onto the market at Berlin one of France’s biggest plays of the year: “Un peuple, et son roi” (“One Nation, One King”), which Studiocanal will open in France on Sept. 26.

Budgeted at €16.9 million ($20.8 million), “One Nation, One King” is director Pierre Schoeller’s (“The Minister”) attempt to convey the scale of events of the 1789 French Revolution from the point of view of ordinary people, who for the first time were able to power events and develop a national consciousness instead of remaining passive victims.

Those revolutionaries are represented by two of France’s most-awarded young leads: Gaspard Ulliel, who won a best actor Cesar Award for Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World,” and Adèle Haenel, Cesar-nominated four times in the last decade, winning supporting actress for “Suzanne” and actress for “Love at First Fight.” Olivier Gourmet (“[link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

August Diehl Stars in New Us Trailer for Biopic 'The Young Karl Marx'

"You are the greatest thinker of our times." The Orchard has released an official Us trailer for the indie biopic The Young Karl Marx, which first premiered at the Berlin Film Festival last year. This film tells the story of a young Karl Marx, as the title indicates, who became one of the great philosophers and activists in the mid-1800s. German actor August Diehl (seen in Inglourious Basterds) plays Karl Marx, and Vicky Krieps (seen in Phantom Thread) plays his wife, along with a cast including Stefan Konarske, Olivier Gourmet, Hannah Steele, Alexander Scheer, Hans-Uwe Bauer, Michael Brandner, and Ivan Franek. I'm intrigued by this, and it's described as "a spry romp through the seven years leading up to the drafting of the Communist Manifesto." This film looks like it's seriously worth your time. Check it out below. Here's the official Us trailer (+ poster) for Raoul Peck's The Young Karl Marx,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Charades reveals first look at Paris Rendez-vous titles 'Conviction', 'Head Above Water' (exclusive)

Sales company was launched by Carole Baraton, Yohann Comte and Pierre Mazars last year.

Source: Charades

Marina Foïs in ‘Conviction’

Fledgling sales company Charades - launched by Carole Baraton, Yohann Comte and Pierre Mazars last year - makes its Unifrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris (Dec 18-22) debut this week with two first features.

The Paris-based outfit, working out of roof-top offices above the Rendez-vous’s Gaumont Opéra Cinema screening hub, will kick off sales on Antoine Raimbault’s murder trial drama Conviction and Margaux Bonhomme’s Head Above Water, about a young woman who takes on the care of her mentally and physically challenged sister.

The company has released exclusive first looks at both films.

Source: Charades

‘Head Above Water’

“We fell in love with these personal stories at the script stage,” said Mazars and Baraton.

“They correspond with our desire to work with young film-makers and defend them internationally as well as support talented female
See full article at ScreenDaily »

November 2017 VOD Releases Include Mayhem, I Remember You, Nails

  • DailyDead
Now that us horror fans have to look past Halloween, there’s a certain sadness that sets in once we realize our favorite holiday is now 365 days away. But fear not! We have a bunch of great films coming to digital and VOD to get you through these dark times, including Joe Lynch’s Mayhem (which bows on November 10th, and it’s a film that I cannot recommend enough—so much fun!).

Other notable films hitting digital platforms throughout the month include Bad Match (on November 3rd), The Elf (on November 7th), Radius from Epic Pictures (November 10th), IFC Midnight’s Nails (November 17th), and the psychological thriller Woodshock rounds out the month’s releases on November 28th.

24 Hours to Live (Saban Films) – November 3rd on Ultra VOD

24 Hours to Live is a fast-paced action-packed movie about a career assassin (Ethan Hawke) who is given a chance at redemption
See full article at DailyDead »

New Us Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa's 'Daguerrotype' Ghost Story Film

"You bend reality to suit yourself." An official Us trailer has arrived for one of Japanese filmmaker Kiyoshi Kurosawa's films from last year, titled Daguerrotype (properly spelled - Daguerreotype). The film first premiered at the 2016 Toronto Film Festival, and has been awaiting a Us release ever since. It goes under a few different titles - The Woman in the Silver Plate, or in France it's Le secret de la chambre noire, which translates roughly to The Secret of the Dark Room. French actor Tahir Rahim stars as a young apprentice in Paris, back in the days of daguerreotypes. He falls for the photographer's daughter, but they learn there's some kind of malevolent forces stopping them from escaping. The full cast includes Olivier Gourmet, Constance Rousseau, Mathieu Amalric, Malik Zidi, Valérie Sibilia. This seems like a strange film. Here's the official Us trailer (+ poster) for Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Daguerrotype, direct
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

U.S. Trailer for Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Ghost Story ‘Daguerrotype’ Starring Tahar Rahim

The U.S. distribution of Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s films are never guaranteed, so when one comes our way, we’ll take it however it arrives. His ghost story Daguerrotype, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last fall, will get a VOD release next month, on November 7, and now a new trailer has landed.

Starring Tahar Rahim, Constance Rousseau, and Olivier Gourmet, the story follows a daguerreotype photographer’s assistant who falls in love with his employer’s daughter and things get more mysterious therein. See the trailer below, following an excerpt from our review:

Kiyoshi Kurosawa has ways of making it look easy, even unimpressive. To my knowledge, he has never made a film that’s less than a pleasure to simply observe, richly detailed in environment and carefully calibrated in composition, cutting, and gesture — masterclasses too focused on feeling (excitement, mystery, romance, and, most often, terror) to pronounce great pretensions.
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff

  • Indiewire
‘Before We Vanish’ Review: Kiyoshi Kurosawa Inches Towards Relevance With Sedate Alien Invasion Story — Nyff
Watching the dreadful and painfully distended films Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa made over the last 10 years, you’d be forgiven for thinking that he was abducted in 2008 and hijacked by a clueless alien parasite trying to keep up appearances. A major figure during the early days of J-horror, Kurosawa distilled the entropy creeping into the digital age before most other artists even felt it — modern classics like “Cure,” “Pulse,” and even the less-horrifying likes of “Bright Future” continue to serve as invaluable time capsules from the era that we’re still trying to escape.

As recently as “Tokyo Sonata,” which is now almost a decade old, it seemed as though Kurosawa could sublimate his obsessions with societal decay into any genre, and the shattering final scene of that film left fans desperate to see where he would go next.

Then, things got bad. The falloff was subtle at first, and it came in small doses,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review
The Midwife (Sage femme) Director: Martin Provost Written by: Martin Provost Cast: Catherine Frot, Catherine Deneuve, Olivier Gourmet, Quentin Dolmaire, Mylène Demongeot Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/1/17 Opens: July 21 in theaters and October 17 on DVD. Some say that opposites attract; for example, good listeners and good talkers could easily match up. Others […]

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Dardenne Brothers on Finding the Rhythm of ‘The Unknown Girl’ and Forgetting the Past

Those with any standing interest in the Dardenne brothers are well aware that The Unknown Girl is not a standard project, at least in how it’s traveled from creation to release. Breaking their long-standing one-every-three-years tradition, premiering but two (two!) years after Two Days, One Night, is one thing, and a forgivable thing at that had it earned the critical plaudits and awards handed them every single go-round. That it hobbled out of Cannes with, at best, “friendly” notices (if that) and nothing else in tow is, in and of itself, enough, but then the perfectionist pair went and reedited the film on account of these issues. Are some of the world’s most acclaimed filmmakers handing us a damaged object?

To my mind, no. The Unknown Girl is über-Dardenne brothers, a seemingly slight detective story collapsing nearly innumerable aesthetic, formal, and thematic interests into a warm embrace, reminding
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Above the Law' ('Tueurs'): Film Review | Venice 2017

'Above the Law' ('Tueurs'): Film Review | Venice 2017
Brussels sprouts with crime and corruption in Above the Law (Tueurs), a lean Belgian thriller that's as generic as both its Anglophone and original titles. Starring Dardenne brothers favorite Olivier Gourmet as a veteran robber embarking on the inevitable "one last job," this French co-production has a streak of convincing authenticity in its smaller details, likely traceable to the criminal pedigree of its ex-jailbird co-director/co-writer Francois Troukens.

Since serving six years of a 28-year-sentence for a series of van heists in the 1990s, Troukens has become something of a media celebrity in his native Belgium, and his promotional smarts should...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Foreign Productions Flock to Brussels’ Locations, Tax Incentives

Foreign Productions Flock to Brussels’ Locations, Tax Incentives
The city of Brussels has seen a lot of excitement lately. Gangsters have been running wild with racing-car drivers, the Hitler Youth have taken to marching in the street, and a submarine has sunk, costing hundreds of lives. It’s fair to say that, even as far as movie shoots go, Brussels is nothing if not diverse, playing itself in the 1980s for Michael R. Roskam’s crime drama “Racer and the Jailbird,” doubling as wartime Berlin in Amma Asante’s powerful love story “Where Hands Touch,” and even dressing up as Russia in Thomas Vinterberg’s “Kursk,” the story of the Russian submarine that exploded underwater during a naval exercise in 2000. No wonder they’re calling it “the queen of filming locations.”

There are many reasons for the rise of Brussels as an international shooting hub, starting with its location in the heart of Europe, just 80 minutes from Paris and two hours by Eurostar from London
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Guilt as Madness: An Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

  • MUBI
Photo by Darren HughesThe Unknown Girl opens with a handheld close up of Dr. Jenny (Adèle Haenel) examining a patient. “Listen,” she says, handing her stethoscope to Julien (Olivier Bonnaud), a medical student who is interning at her clinic. Never ones to shy away from a glaring metaphor, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne announce in that brief exchange their film’s driving thematic and formal concerns. When Jenny later learns that her decision to not allow a late-night visitor into the clinic might have contributed to the young woman’s death, she puts her skills and training to new purpose: listening for clues that might help solve the murder.The Unknown Girl differs from the Dardennes’ previous fiction films only in its more obviously generic plotting. This seems to have contributed to the uncharacteristically mixed reviews that greeted the film at its 2016 Cannes premiere, where it was faulted for failing to
See full article at MUBI »

‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

  • Indiewire
‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title
According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Midwife (Sage femme) movie review: the birth pangs of midlife renewal

MaryAnn’s quick take… The chemistry of two formidable actresses fuels an extraordinary yet subtle clash in a nuanced, unsentimental story about how women’s friendships shape our lives. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Huh. French drama The Midwife is almost the same movie as American indie The Last Word, in thematic terms if not down to the small details: an older, rather obnoxious woman and a younger one who needs a bit of a boot in the ass strike up a friendship, to the eventually betterment of both of them, though not after a rocky ride. I watched both films almost back to back, and I’m glad this one came second, because it washed away the terrible taste the first one left. Midwife gets right everything
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

The Midwife (Sage femme) movie review: the birth pangs of midlife renewal

MaryAnn’s quick take… The chemistry of two formidable actresses fuels an extraordinary yet subtle clash in a nuanced, unsentimental story about how women’s friendships shape our lives. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Huh. French drama The Midwife is almost the same movie as American indie The Last Word, in thematic terms if not down to the small details: an older, rather obnoxious woman and a younger one who needs a bit of a boot in the ass strike up a friendship, to the eventually betterment of both of them, though not after a rocky ride. I watched both films almost back to back, and I’m glad this one came second, because it washed away the terrible taste the first one left. Midwife gets right everything
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

ITV Studios Global Entertainment Appoints VP of Sales for French-Speaking Europe

ITV Studios Global Entertainment (Itvs Ge) has appointed former BBC Worldwide senior exec Vincent Baylaucq as vice president of sales for French-speaking Europe.

Based in Paris, Baylaucq will be responsible for expanding Itvs Ge’s business across France and Francophone territories. In his newly created role, Baylaucq will oversee the distribution of content from Tetra Media Studio, a production company acquired in February, across the region.

Tetra Media Studio has produced a flurry of popular drama series including “Un Village Français” and “Les Hommes de l’Ombre” (“Spin”).

“ITV has a very clear strategy to grow its international content business. Together with their international family of companies including Tetra Media Studio, ITV Studios produces world-class and high-quality award-winning content which French broadcasters are particularly fond of,” said Baylaucq, who will report to Dan Gopal, the executive VP of Emea distribution and global digital partners.

Gopal said that “the French-speaking market remains an important and growing region for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlinale 2017: The Midwife Review

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Stefan Pape

We’re all rather fond of routine, and you get to a certain age in life when you’ve settled on your friends, you don’t really need any more. We can fear the return of that old companion, somebody from a former life, somebody you feel there’s a reason you lost contact with. It’s this notion that Martin Provost’s The Midwife thrives on, and while we feel the anxiety and impatience of our protagonist in this endeavour when her life is disrupted – the overriding sentiment to take away is that change is not always such a bad thing after all.

Catherine Frot plays the aforementioned role, the experienced, compassionate midwife Claire Breton, who returns home from a nightshift to a voicemail – from Béatrice Sobolevski (Catherine Deneuve), an old friend of Claire’s, who eventually went to have a relationship with her father, a successful Olympic swimmer.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Berlin Film Review: ‘The Midwife’

Berlin Film Review: ‘The Midwife’
It takes a certain inverted chutzpah to make a drama about someone who’s a real fuddy-duddy. A French fuddy-duddy (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Claire (Catherine Frot), the title character of “The Midwife,” is a strenuously decent person, and that’s part of her fuddy-duddyness. She’s the most experienced and devoted midwife at a struggling maternity clinic in Paris. We watch her deliver several babies during the film’s opening minutes, and it’s obvious that she’s wonderful at her job, and that it leaves her sleep-deprived and emotionally drained because it’s a calling, a mission that occupies the center of her existence. Maybe that’s because nothing else does.

Claire, who’s got an adult son in medical school (though he’s about to flake out of it), has always been a single mom. The clinic she works at is getting ready to close down,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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