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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

16 items from 2017


The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review

8 September 2017 6:45 AM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

The Midwife (Sage femme) Director: Martin Provost Written by: Martin Provost Cast: Catherine Frot, Catherine Deneuve, Olivier Gourmet, Quentin Dolmaire, Mylène Demongeot Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/1/17 Opens: July 21 in theaters and October 17 on DVD. Some say that opposites attract; for example, good listeners and good talkers could easily match up. Others […]

The post The Midwife (Sage femme) Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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Dardenne Brothers on Finding the Rhythm of ‘The Unknown Girl’ and Forgetting the Past

6 September 2017 12:15 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Those with any standing interest in the Dardenne brothers are well aware that The Unknown Girl is not a standard project, at least in how it’s traveled from creation to release. Breaking their long-standing one-every-three-years tradition, premiering but two (two!) years after Two Days, One Night, is one thing, and a forgivable thing at that had it earned the critical plaudits and awards handed them every single go-round. That it hobbled out of Cannes with, at best, “friendly” notices (if that) and nothing else in tow is, in and of itself, enough, but then the perfectionist pair went and reedited the film on account of these issues. Are some of the world’s most acclaimed filmmakers handing us a damaged object?

To my mind, no. The Unknown Girl is über-Dardenne brothers, a seemingly slight detective story collapsing nearly innumerable aesthetic, formal, and thematic interests into a warm embrace, reminding »

- Nick Newman

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'Above the Law' ('Tueurs'): Film Review | Venice 2017

5 September 2017 5:52 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Brussels sprouts with crime and corruption in Above the Law (Tueurs), a lean Belgian thriller that's as generic as both its Anglophone and original titles. Starring Dardenne brothers favorite Olivier Gourmet as a veteran robber embarking on the inevitable "one last job," this French co-production has a streak of convincing authenticity in its smaller details, likely traceable to the criminal pedigree of its ex-jailbird co-director/co-writer Francois Troukens.

Since serving six years of a 28-year-sentence for a series of van heists in the 1990s, Troukens has become something of a media celebrity in his native Belgium, and his promotional smarts should »

- Neil Young

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Foreign Productions Flock to Brussels’ Locations, Tax Incentives

2 September 2017 11:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The city of Brussels has seen a lot of excitement lately. Gangsters have been running wild with racing-car drivers, the Hitler Youth have taken to marching in the street, and a submarine has sunk, costing hundreds of lives. It’s fair to say that, even as far as movie shoots go, Brussels is nothing if not diverse, playing itself in the 1980s for Michael R. Roskam’s crime drama “Racer and the Jailbird,” doubling as wartime Berlin in Amma Asante’s powerful love story “Where Hands Touch,” and even dressing up as Russia in Thomas Vinterberg’s “Kursk,” the story of the Russian submarine that exploded underwater during a naval exercise in 2000. No wonder they’re calling it “the queen of filming locations.”

There are many reasons for the rise of Brussels as an international shooting hub, starting with its location in the heart of Europe, just 80 minutes from Paris and two hours by Eurostar from London »

- Damon Wise

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Guilt as Madness: An Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

29 August 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Photo by Darren HughesThe Unknown Girl opens with a handheld close up of Dr. Jenny (Adèle Haenel) examining a patient. “Listen,” she says, handing her stethoscope to Julien (Olivier Bonnaud), a medical student who is interning at her clinic. Never ones to shy away from a glaring metaphor, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne announce in that brief exchange their film’s driving thematic and formal concerns. When Jenny later learns that her decision to not allow a late-night visitor into the clinic might have contributed to the young woman’s death, she puts her skills and training to new purpose: listening for clues that might help solve the murder.The Unknown Girl differs from the Dardennes’ previous fiction films only in its more obviously generic plotting. This seems to have contributed to the uncharacteristically mixed reviews that greeted the film at its 2016 Cannes premiere, where it was faulted for failing to »

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‘Creepy’ Review: ‘Pulse’ Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa Returns to Form with a Chiller That Lives Up to Its Title

3 August 2017 11:23 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

According to a lecture given early in “Creepy,” serial killers are broken down into three categories: organized, disorganized, and mixed characteristic. The first two are relatively easy to define, and thus simpler to track down. Mixed-characteristic killers, meanwhile, exhibit no discernible patterns. They’re puzzles, anomalies. You can probably guess which class of killer this detective story from Kiyoshi Kurosawa follows.

The director, whose genre mastery is most evident in the likes of “Pulse” and “Cure,” more recently delved into this territory in “Daguerreotype.” That old-fashioned haunt took him outside Japan with the help of Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet, and Mathieu Amalric; “Creepy” is both a return home and a return to form. Here he’s woven a procedural yarn from a novel by Yutaka Maekawa that was either loosely adapted or strikingly aligned with the director’s long-established sensibilities.

Read MoreNew Films By Terence Davies & Kiyoshi Kurosawa Set Berlin Premieres, »

- Michael Nordine

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The Midwife (Sage femme) movie review: the birth pangs of midlife renewal

8 July 2017 10:58 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take… The chemistry of two formidable actresses fuels an extraordinary yet subtle clash in a nuanced, unsentimental story about how women’s friendships shape our lives. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Huh. French drama The Midwife is almost the same movie as American indie The Last Word, in thematic terms if not down to the small details: an older, rather obnoxious woman and a younger one who needs a bit of a boot in the ass strike up a friendship, to the eventually betterment of both of them, though not after a rocky ride. I watched both films almost back to back, and I’m glad this one came second, because it washed away the terrible taste the first one left. Midwife gets right everything »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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The Midwife (Sage femme) movie review: the birth pangs of midlife renewal

8 July 2017 10:58 AM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take… The chemistry of two formidable actresses fuels an extraordinary yet subtle clash in a nuanced, unsentimental story about how women’s friendships shape our lives. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Huh. French drama The Midwife is almost the same movie as American indie The Last Word, in thematic terms if not down to the small details: an older, rather obnoxious woman and a younger one who needs a bit of a boot in the ass strike up a friendship, to the eventually betterment of both of them, though not after a rocky ride. I watched both films almost back to back, and I’m glad this one came second, because it washed away the terrible taste the first one left. Midwife gets right everything »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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ITV Studios Global Entertainment Appoints VP of Sales for French-Speaking Europe

30 June 2017 3:02 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

ITV Studios Global Entertainment (Itvs Ge) has appointed former BBC Worldwide senior exec Vincent Baylaucq as vice president of sales for French-speaking Europe.

Based in Paris, Baylaucq will be responsible for expanding Itvs Ge’s business across France and Francophone territories. In his newly created role, Baylaucq will oversee the distribution of content from Tetra Media Studio, a production company acquired in February, across the region.

Tetra Media Studio has produced a flurry of popular drama series including “Un Village Français” and “Les Hommes de l’Ombre” (“Spin”).

“ITV has a very clear strategy to grow its international content business. Together with their international family of companies including Tetra Media Studio, ITV Studios produces world-class and high-quality award-winning content which French broadcasters are particularly fond of,” said Baylaucq, who will report to Dan Gopal, the executive VP of Emea distribution and global digital partners.

Gopal said that “the French-speaking market remains an important and growing region for »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Berlinale 2017: The Midwife Review

16 February 2017 9:51 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Stefan Pape

 

We’re all rather fond of routine, and you get to a certain age in life when you’ve settled on your friends, you don’t really need any more. We can fear the return of that old companion, somebody from a former life, somebody you feel there’s a reason you lost contact with. It’s this notion that Martin Provost’s The Midwife thrives on, and while we feel the anxiety and impatience of our protagonist in this endeavour when her life is disrupted – the overriding sentiment to take away is that change is not always such a bad thing after all.

Catherine Frot plays the aforementioned role, the experienced, compassionate midwife Claire Breton, who returns home from a nightshift to a voicemail – from Béatrice Sobolevski (Catherine Deneuve), an old friend of Claire’s, who eventually went to have a relationship with her father, a successful Olympic swimmer. »

- Stefan Pape

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Berlin Film Review: ‘The Midwife’

14 February 2017 1:35 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It takes a certain inverted chutzpah to make a drama about someone who’s a real fuddy-duddy. A French fuddy-duddy (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Claire (Catherine Frot), the title character of “The Midwife,” is a strenuously decent person, and that’s part of her fuddy-duddyness. She’s the most experienced and devoted midwife at a struggling maternity clinic in Paris. We watch her deliver several babies during the film’s opening minutes, and it’s obvious that she’s wonderful at her job, and that it leaves her sleep-deprived and emotionally drained because it’s a calling, a mission that occupies the center of her existence. Maybe that’s because nothing else does.

Claire, who’s got an adult son in medical school (though he’s about to flake out of it), has always been a single mom. The clinic she works at is getting ready to close down, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Berlin Film Review: ‘The Young Karl Marx’

13 February 2017 4:16 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As a director, Raoul Peck is a passionate and protean talent. He has been making films for close to 30 years, and he’s right in the middle of his most seismic moment with “I Am Not Your Negro,” his searching meditation on James Baldwin, which has struck a deeper, wider chord than anyone might have anticipated. In 2000, Peck made a galvanizing drama about Patrice Lumumba, the first democratically elected leader of the Congo, that was the cinema’s most perceptive (and agonizing) study of colonialism: what it is, how it works, why its legacy is so hard to shake off.

Now, at the Berlin Film Festival, Peck takes a different leap altogether with “The Young Karl Marx,” a classically conceived and executed biopic that traces how Marx, as a struggling family-man writer in the 1840s, came to create “The Communist Manifesto.” It’s an impeccably crafted and honorable movie — but, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Berlin: First Clip & Images From ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Director Raoul Peck’s New Film ‘The Young Karl Marx’

6 February 2017 7:39 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Next to Ava DuVernay’s “13th,” there is perhaps no movie more vital to the current moment of race relations, political unrest, and social and class strife than “I Am Not Your Negro.” Raoul Peck’s documentary uses some of the final writings of James Baldwin to paint an incendiary portrait of the political climate, and his interest in figures who have stirred popular thought continues with his next film, “The Young Karl Marx.”

A narrative feature that will be premiering at the Berlin Film Festival, it stars August Diehl, Stefan Konarske, Vicky Krieps, Olivier Gourmet, Michael Brandner, Alexander Scheer, Hannah Steele, and Niels Bruno Schmidt, it follows the exiled Karl Marx who becomes newly inspired to revolution when he meets Friedrich Engels.

Continue reading Berlin: First Clip & Images From ‘I Am Not Your Negro’ Director Raoul Peck’s New Film ‘The Young Karl Marx’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Berlin sets competition, adds Amazon and BBC drama premieres

20 January 2017 5:32 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the festival in Out Of Competition berths are Stanley Tucci-directed Final Portrait and Catherine Deneuve drama Sage Femme.

James Gray’s The Lost City Of Z will have its interntional premiere while documentary The Trial: The State of Russia vs Oleg Sentsov will have its world premiere.

Among TV world premieres are Amazon’s Patriot and BBC One’s SS-gb.

In total, 18 of the 24 films selected for Competitionwill be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Berlin finalises competition, adds TV premieres

20 January 2017 5:32 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve dramas join competition; TV dramas and Oleg Sentsov doc set to get world premiere.

The Berlin International Film Festival has finalised its competition and Berlinale Special strands.

Joining the competition are

18 of the 24 films selected for Competition will be competing for the Golden and the Silver Bears. 22 of the films will have their world premieres at the festival.

The Berlinale Special will present recent works by contemporary filmmakers, documentaries, and extraordinary formats, as well as brand new series from around the world.

Berlinale Special Galas will be held at the Friedrichstadt-Palast and Zoo Palast. Other Special premieres will take place at the Kino International. Moderated discussions will follow the screenings at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele.

For the third time, Berlinale Special Series will present a selection of TV series in the official programme. Six German and international productions will have their world premieres at the Haus der Berliner Festspiele this year. Audiences »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Berlin Festival Rounds Out Lineup With Stanley Tucci, Catherine Deneuve Titles

20 January 2017 1:10 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The Berlin International Film Festival on Friday finalized its competition lineup of films that will compete for this year's Gold and Silver Bears.

The competition title added is Hao ji le (Have a Nice Day) by Liu Jian (Piercing I). Out of competition slots went to ythe world premieres of Stanley Tucci and Catherine Deneuve titles. Final Portrait, directed by Stanley Tucci and starring Geoffrey Rush, Armie Hammer, Clemence Poesy, Tony Shalhoub, James Faulkner and Sylvie Testud, and Sage femme (Midwife) by Martin Provost (Violette), starring Catherine Frot, Catherine Deneuve and Olivier Gourmet. »

- Scott Roxborough,Georg Szalai

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002

16 items from 2017


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