Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

Connect with IMDb



2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

20 items from 2007


Lesher in center of Paramount shuffle

6 December 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Paramount Pictures is about to undergo something of an executive face lift as John Lesher, who has already refurbished the studio's specialty film division, takes on a new role at the main studio.

Although exact titles, responsibilities and reporting lines are expected to be unveiled early in the new year, insiders are anticipating that studio head Brad Grey will be handing out a round of promotions. In addition to Lesher, who currently holds the title of president of Paramount Vantage, Rob Moore, who is president of worldwide marketing, distribution and operations, will be elevated along with Brad Weston, the studio's current president of production.

The expectation is that Nick Meyer, the former president of Lionsgate International who joined Lesher at Paramount Vantage as the division's co-president in the fall, would take the reigns at Vantage.

Lesher himself moved from the agency world -- at Endeavor, he repped such tony clients as Martin Scorsese, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and Walter Salles »

Permalink | Report a problem


Taylor-Minkler in mix at USS

24 October 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The feature mixing team of Jon Taylor and Christian P. Minkler has joined Universal Studios Sound, where they will be mixing on Stage 6 on the Universal lot. The pair, previously at Todd-AO Radford, were the sound re-recording mixers on helmer Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Babel, which earned them a BAFTA nomination and a Cinema Audio Society Award nomination. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Basinger joins Theron on Arriaga's 'Burning Plain'

18 October 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Holy career comeback Batman!Vicky Vale- um, I mean, Kim Basinger, has just signed on to co-star with Charlize Theron in Guillermo Arriga's directorial debut, The Burning Plain for 2929 Prods. Arriaga, known mostly for his collaborations with helmer Alejandro González Iñárritu (Amores Perros, 21 Grams, Babel), also penned the screenplay for Burning Plain. Basinger will play Theron's mother- and much of the film will center around Theron's character's turbulent childhood. The film is set to roll in November, once Basinger wraps the Bret Easton Ellis adaptation, The Informers, opposite Billy Bob Thorton. Arriga's tragedy-filled screenplays are known to be prime Oscar bait. They are also extremely demanding of the actors in volved, and both leading ladies in the film will likely be put through the ringer. We all know that Theron is great at these types of roles after her Oscar winning work in Monster, but Basinger hasn't had a great role since L. »

Permalink | Report a problem


SBIFF puts Blanchett in Master class

3 October 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Cate Blanchett, who reprises her role as Queen Elizabeth in the upcoming Elizabeth: The Golden Age, will be honored with the Modern Master Award at the 2008 Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

She will receive the award during a tribute ceremony Jan. 26 at Santa Barbara's Arlington Theatre.

Blanchett, who earned Golden Globe and BAFTA awards for her performance in 1998's Elizabeth, also is known for her roles in such films as Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Babel and Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings trilogy. She won an Oscar for her portrayal of Katharine Hepburn in Martin Scorsese's The Aviator. She also stars in Todd Haynes' upcoming I'm Not There, in which she embodies one stage in the life of Bob Dylan.

"Cate Blanchett is the most consummate actor, and portraying Queen Elizabeth and Bob Dylan in the same year -- and so indelibly -- is pure alchemy," SBIFF executive director Roger Durling said.

The SBIFF runs from Jan. 24-Feb. 3.

The Modern Master Award is the highest honor presented by the festival; past recipients include Michael Douglas, Jackson and Jodie Foster. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Three Amigos prep all-star first offering via Uni

22 June 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

MEXICO CITY -- When Universal Pictures and its specialty division Focus Features International signed an ambitious five-film deal with Cha Cha Cha, the upstart shingle of helmers Alfonso Cuaron, Guillermo Del Toro and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, the groundbreaking venture allowed the partners to form a dream team of Mexican talent.

An expected payoff is already evident with the company's first project, Rudo y Cursi. Currently in production on Mexico's Pacific coast, the film's credits read like a who's who of contemporary Mexican cinema.

Cuaron, Del Toro and Inarritu, the so-called Three Amigos of a new wave of Mexican crossover hits, are co-producing the picture, which reunites Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna, the stars of Cuaron's hit road movie Y Tu Mama Tambien.

Y Tu Mama scribe Carlos Cuaron, brother of Alfonso, wrote the script and is directing the film. Academy Award winner Eugenio Caballero is on board as production designer.

Carlos Cuaron describes the story as a love-hate relationship between two brothers who play professional soccer. In futbol-mad Mexico, a soccer-themed movie featuring two of Mexico's most bankable actors is almost a guaranteed hit.

The production even boasts some famed non-Mexican talent, such as cinematographer Adam Kimmel, director of photography on Capote, and Argentinean comedian Guillermo Francella. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Bored Polanski Storms Out of Cannes Conference

21 May 2007 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Revered moviemaker Roman Polanski has sparked a new controversy at the Cannes Film Festival after storming out of a press conference. The director grew restless during a tribute to the cinema and complained journalists were asking "empty" questions, before inviting fellow moviemakers including Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and Wim Wenders to join him in walking out. Polanski, whose film The Pianist won the top prize at the festival in 2002, joined 27 major directors who were taking part in the homage to the movies, dubbed "To Each His Own Cinema." When the conference's moderator announced that journalists had just two minutes left to ask their remaining questions, Polanski took the microphone and said, "It's a shame to have such poor questions, such empty questions." He then stood and said, "Frankly, let's all go and have lunch," before walking out. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Three amigos' seek film industry support

21 March 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

MEXICO CITY -- Mexican directors Guillermo Del Toro, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and Alfonso Cuaron, fresh off a raft of awards season accolades, met this week with Mexico's new president to urge more support for the struggling national film industry.

The trio said on a Tuesday morning news program that they recently met with President Felipe Calderon in a bid to garner more backing for the industry. They added that they plan to meet with lawmakers Wednesday.

The three filmmakers, who also produce movies, are pressuring the federal government to create better distribution and exhibition opportunities for local production companies. Of about 60 films produced here in 2006, only half hit theaters.

They also would like to see Mexico's television networks become more involved in film production as numerous European broadcasters have done.

There are signs that the government is showing more interest in film. Last week, a new tax incentive went into effect that should help boost domestic production considerably. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar: Best Director

25 February 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Winner: Martin Scorsese - The Departed My Pick: Alejandro González Iñárritu - Babel Outside the Box: Todd Field - Little Children & Alfonso Cuaron - Children of Men Comments: Ask me which film deserves best picture this year and I’ll say that my first and second picks are not on the ballot. Ask me if Marty deserves an Oscar and I’ll respond yes, for Taxi Driver and Raging Bull. Ask me if I’d split the vote like how the Academy picked Best Picture and Best Director in last year’s vote and I’d say it should have occurred again this year. The Departed is the strongest feature among the five, but Iñárritu continues to impress us with his cinematic mind and hand. High five for Marty and Alejandro.         »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar noms all over map; 'Babel' hones int'l flavor

24 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The multilingual Babel clearly spoke Oscar's language Tuesday morning, when nominations for the 79th Annual Academy Awards were announced. The musical Dreamgirls might have earned the most nominations, eight, but it was shut out of the best picture race.

Instead, it earned the unenviable distinction of becoming the first movie in Oscar history to fail to earn a best picture nomination while collecting the most noms.

"Looking at the whole awards season, there is no clear front-runner," Miramax Films president Daniel Battsek said as he celebrated six noms for The Queen and one for Peter O'Toole's autumnal performance in Venus.

For best picture honors, Babel, with seven noms, will compete against the crime drama The Departed, the Japanese-language war film Letters From Iwo Jima, the quirky comedy Little Miss Sunshine and Queen, a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II under siege from the modern media.

So far, though, a definite front-runner hasn't emerged during an awards season in which Babel earned the title of best drama at the Golden Globes but Little Miss Sunshine took the Producers Guild of America's film prize last weekend.

Babel might tell a globe-hopping story of cultural misunderstandings, but the 5,830 voting members of the Academy seemed to be in a particularly international mood. In the acting categories, they nominated two actresses who deliver foreign-language performances: Penelope Cruz, who stars as a ghost-haunted widow in the Spanish-language Volver, and Rinko Kikuchi, who plays a deaf student speaking Japanese and also signing in Babel. Kikuchi's castmate Adriana Barraza, appearing in a role that combines English and Spanish dialogue, also was rewarded with a nomination.

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Guillermo Del Toro and Alfonso Cuaron, the trio of Mexican-born directors dubbed the Three Amigos, all figured prominently. Gonzalez Inarritu's Babel picked up seven noms, Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth was close behind with six -- including a best foreign-language film nomination -- and Cuaron's Children of Men took three, including best adapted screenplay.

Commenting on the multiculturalism of this year's crop of nominees, Forest Whitaker, nominated as best actor for The Last King of Scotland, said: "We're finally recognizing that we're all here on the planet together." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Complete list of Oscar nominations

23 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

PICTURE

Babel

The Departed

Letters from Iwo Jima

Little Miss Sunshine

The Queen

DIRECTOR

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Babel

Martin Scorsese, The Departed

Clint Eastwood, Letters from Iwo Jima

Stephen Frears, The Queen

Paul Greengrass, United 93

ACTOR

Leonardo DiCaprio, Blood Diamond

Ryan Gosling, Half Nelson

Peter O'Toole, Venus

Will Smith, The Pursuit of Happyness

Forest Whitaker, The Last King of Scotland

ACTRESS

Penelope Cruz, Volver

Judi Dench, Notes on a Scandal

Helen Mirren, The Queen

Meryl Streep, The Devil Wears Prada

Kate Winslet, Little Children

SUPPORTING ACTOR

Alan Arkin, Little Miss Sunshine

Jackie Earle Haley, Little Children

Djimon Hounsou, Blood Diamond

Eddie Murphy, Dreamgirls

Mark Wahlberg, The Departed

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Adriana Barraza, Babel

Cate Blanchett, Notes on a Scandal

Abigail Breslin, Little Miss Sunshine

Jennifer Hudson, Dreamgirls

Rinko Kikuchi, Babel

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

After the Wedding, Denmark

"Days of Glory (Indigenes)," Algeria

The Lives of Others, Germany

Pan's Labyrinth, Mexico

Water, Canada.

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Peter Baynham & Dan Mazer & Todd Phillips, Borat Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan"

Alfonso Cuaron & Timothy J. Sexton and David Arata and Mark Fergus & Hawk Ostby, Children of Men

William Monahan, The Departed

Todd Field & Tom Perrotta, Little Children

Patrick Marber, Notes on a Scandal

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Guillermo Arriaga, Babel

Iris Yamashita & Paul Haggis, Letters from Iwo Jima

Michael Arndt, Little Miss Sunshine

Guillermo Del Toro, Pan's Labyrinth

Peter Morgan, The Queen

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Cars

Happy Feet

Monster House

ART DIRECTION

Dreamgirls

The Good Shepherd

Pan's Labyrinth

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest

The Prestige

CINEMATOGRAPHY

The Black Dahlia

Children of Men

The Illusionist

Pan's Labyrinth

The Prestige

SOUND MIXING

Apocalypto

Blood Diamond

Dreamgirls

Flags of Our Fathers

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest"

SOUND EDITING

Apocalypto

Blood Diamond

Flags of Our Fathers

Letters from Iwo Jima

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest

ORIGINAL SCORE

Babel, Gustavo Santaolalla

The Good German, Thomas Newman

Notes on a Scandal, Philip Glass

Pan's Labyrinth, Javier Navarrete

The Queen, N0006035">Alexandre Desplat.

ORIGINAL SONG

I Need to Wake Up from An Inconvenient Truth, Melissa Etheridge

Listen from Dreamgirls, Henry Krieger, Scott Cutler and Anne Preven

Love You I Do from Dreamgirls, Henry Krieger and Siedah Garrett

Our Town from Cars, Randy Newman

Patience from Dreamgirls, Henry Krieger and Willie Reale. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars: 'Long time coming' for Latinos

23 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

With Spain's Penelope Cruz and Mexico's Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Guillermo Del Toro, Alfonso Cuaron, Adriana Barraza and Guillermo Arriaga all nabbing key Academy Award nominations, Oscar hablo espanol Tuesday morning.

"It has been a long time coming, especially since millions of people speak Spanish as their main language in this country," said Cruz, who was singled out for her role in Pedro Almodovar's Spanish-language "Volver". "It's great that it's finally being reflected in movies."

In fact, the Mexican helming troika of Gonzalez Inarritu, Del Toro and Cuaron garnered a combined 16 nominations for their films "Babel", "Pan's Labyrinth" and "Children of Men", respectively.

Gonzalez Inarritu's director nom and Cruz's best actress mention also represent Oscar firsts: The "Babel" filmmaker became the premier Mexican director nominated for the craft's highest honor, while the "Volver" star is the first actress recognized for a Spanish-speaking role.

For "Babel"'s Barraza, the film's high profile and Academy recognition provide an opportunity for audiences to view a story line rarely portrayed onscreen. "With my character, an immigrant worker, audiences get to see the feelings, the needs, the real reasons why they are here in the United States," she said. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Dreamgirls'  leads  Oscar noms, misses best picture

23 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The multilingual "Babel" clearly spoke Oscar's language Tuesday morning, when nominations for the 79th Annual Academy Awards were announced. The musical "Dreamgirls" might have earned the most nominations, eight, but it was shut out of the best picture race.

Complete list of Academy Award nominations

Instead, it earned the unenviable distinction of becoming the first movie in Oscar history to fail to earn a best picture nomination while collecting the most noms.

"Looking at the whole awards season, there is no clear front-runner," Miramax Films president Daniel Battsek said as he celebrated six noms for "The Queen" and one for Peter O'Toole's autumnal performance in "Venus".

For best picture honors, "Babel", with seven noms, will compete against the crime drama "The Departed", the Japanese-language war film "Letters From Iwo Jima", the quirky comedy "Little Miss Sunshine" and "Queen", a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II under siege from the modern media.

So far, though, a definite front-runner hasn't emerged during an awards season in which "Babel" earned the title of best drama at the Golden Globes but "Little Miss Sunshine" took the Producers Guild of America's film prize last weekend.

"Babel" might tell a globe-hopping story of cultural misunderstandings, but the 5,830 voting members of the Academy seemed to be in a particularly international mood. In the acting categories, they nominated two actresses who deliver foreign-language performances: Penelope Cruz, who stars as a ghost-haunted widow in the Spanish-language "Volver", and Rinko Kikuchi, who plays a deaf student speaking Japanese and also signing in "Babel". Kikuchi's castmate Adriana Barraza, appearing in a role that combines English and Spanish dialogue, also was rewarded with a nomination.

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Guillermo Del Toro and Alfonso Cuaron, the trio of Mexican-born directors dubbed the Three Amigos, all figured prominently as well. Gonzalez Inarritu's "Babel" picked up seven noms, Del Toro's "Pan's Labyrinth" was close behind with six -- including a best foreign-language film nomination -- and Cuaron's "Children of Men" took three, including best adapted screenplay.

Commenting on the multiculturalism of this year's crop of nominees, Forest Whitaker, nominated as best actor for "The Last King of Scotland", said: "We're finally recognizing that we're all here on the planet together. We all have lives and stories that connect each other. It's amazing, really."

"If you look at a lot of nominated films and filmmakers, from Alfonso Cuaron to 'Babel' to 'Pan's Labyrinth, ' you see that filmmaking is now a global world, and both Hollywood and audiences aren't intimidated by subtitles anymore," said IFC Entertainment president Jonathan Sehring, whose company was behind two of the foreign-language film nominees, Denmark's "After the Wedding" and Algeria's "Days of Glory".

With several co-productions among rival studios showing up in this year's nominations, victory had many fathers. Under new chairman Brad Grey, Paramount Pictures staged a resurgence. After it picked up just three noms last year, it laid claim to 19 this time: eight for "Dreamgirls", which it co-produced with DreamWorks, now a division of Paramount, and then released; two from "Flags of Our Fathers", which DreamWorks co-produced with Warner Bros. Pictures; and another nine on behalf of its specialty division Paramount Vantage, which distributed both "Babel" and the documentary "An Inconvenient Truth".

Warners tallied 18 noms, with "Departed" and "Blood Diamond" leading the pack with five each, while "Iwo Jima", which it co-produced with DreamWorks, received four. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Backstage, Mirren works blue

16 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Helen Mirren won the best television actress award for her regal title role in "Elizabeth I", but backstage she was working blue, cracking jokes about what it means to be an Essex girl ("You know when an Essex girl has an orgasm, she drops her fries"). In fact, the joke carried on to her prospects for an Oscar. "I've never had an 'O.' They said the earth moves," she said. "I can't wait. I'll definitely drop my fries for that." While Mirren was playful in her first win, she was thankful for her second, best actress in a motion picture for "The Queen". "I've been here a few times and sat there at tables loaded with awards and did not have one myself. It's great to have it the other way around," she said. She also added how thankful she was for the recognition awarded her for "Elizabeth I", which she said was ignored by BAFTA. "For it to be recognized tonight, it means the world to me." And commenting on the slew of awards she's had over the years: "Now I'm not so scared anymore. At first you think it is an accident or a flash in the pan. And then the second time you think the same thing. And then the third and fourth time you start thinking that maybe I'm doing my job right. Maybe it's OK."

****

Clint Eastwood joked about his odd position of being an American winner in the foreign-language film category for "Letters From Iwo Jima". "Now that I'm a foreign director, I need to learn some foreign languages," he said. Later, he joked that his next film was going to be in Hungarian. But he also was put on the defensive when he asked how small foreign films can compete with a big U.S. studio movie. "Our budget on 'Letters' was not exactly overwhelming," he said. "We shot for 32 days, and I did it while I was waiting for postproduction to be prepared for 'Flags of Our Fathers.' ('Letters' is) a small picture by most standards." He also explained how he made the film using four translators and was able to communicate with star Ken Watanabe in English. He added that the Battle of Iwo Jima is not widely known in Japan. "None of my actors had ever heard of this. Even Ken Watanabe, who is in his 40s, had to research it," Eastwood said. "But I've been getting comments from Japan ... saying it's good closure for them."

****

"Dreamgirls" producer Laurence Mark wants to see Hollywood raise its voice in song. "We don't have many musicals these days. I hope this will revive something," he said after taking the Globe for best film -- comedy or musical. "And by the way -- Jennifer Lopez, I'd be happy to make a musical with her." But it will be hard to top the lineup Mark assembled for "Dreamgirls". "I really don't believe in the past 25 years there has been a better cast," he said. Jamie Foxx, who won a Globe two years ago for his turn in "Ray", said that this time around he was happy to celebrate the wins for his "Dreamgirls" co-stars Eddie Murphy and Jennifer Hudson. "I'm going to say this: I had a great time when it was my time, but it is their time now," Foxx said. "And it is so great to be able to see them doing their thing."

****

Some of those mystified by "Babel" had a chance to ask director-producer Alejandro Gonzalez Innaritu what exactly his movie was about. "The inter-connectivity of life? The randomness of life? The pain of life? You open a newspaper and you find good news and bad news. Life is like that," said Innaritu, who stood with fellow producers Steve Golin and Jon Kilik. "It's a mosaic of emotions, and these characters are joined spiritually by pain. That is how life works every day, and that is the complexity of the film." As for the movie's place in the awards standings, Innaritu said that was unimportant. "The film will stay and endure for several years in time, and that is the most important thing."

****

Meryl Streep had no idea that she talked for four minutes upon accepting her award for best performance by an actress in a motion picture -- musical or comedy. "I hate people that do that", Streep said. "I'm sorry. I thought I was speaking so rapidly." Streep gives credit for her fabulous roles to the rising female executives at the studios who are receiving greenlight authority. In fact, Streep encouraged female reporters to line up at the boxoffice if they want to see more movies like "Prada". "Demand drives market, and if everyone does that, it will change things," she said. "Unless women do that, they'll be making films for a certain market, those on date night, and it limits the market." When asked about her future role as Mamma in the screen adaptation of the ABBA musical "Mamma Mia!" Streep said she's more afraid of the physicality of the role, rather than the voice training. "There is a lot of dancing", she groaned.

****

After taking home yet another top actor prize for his uncanny incarnation of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, Forest Whitaker summed up the secret of his recent successes on the big and small screens. "With the right script and right character, I am going to do my best work," he said. "I really feel I have been able to do my best work in the last couple of years. I am proud of it." Once Whitaker landed the role of a lifetime as Amin, he delved into the historical figure and let the character envelope him. "He was very charismatic, very funny," said Whitaker, who was nominated for a Golden Globe for the 1989 drama "Bird". "That's how he was able to rise to power."

****

Sacha Baron Cohen confirmed what we all knew: The most unpleasant moment in "Borat" was clearly the naked scene with his producer pal Ken Davitian. »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Dreamgirls' is supreme with three Globe wins

16 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The musical "Dreamgirls" danced away with three Golden Globes. The contemporary drama "Babel", which headed into the event with a dominant seven nominations, was shut out until the end of the evening, when it was named best drama. And actresses who played queens of the realm and queens of the fashion world reigned as the 64th annual Golden Globe Awards were spread among 11 films Monday night.

On the TV side, ABC swept the top series categories with the drama "Grey's Anatomy" and the comedy "Ugly Betty", while "Betty" star America Ferrera got the best actress in a comedy series award.

HBO's biopic "Elizabeth I" was the most-heralded program of the night, with trophies for best miniseries or TV movie, supporting actor Jeremy Irons and star Helen Mirren.

In fact, Mirren could be forgiven if she experienced a moment of Deja Vu at the ceremony at the Beverly Hilton, hosted by the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. Having visited the stage for her work in "Elizabeth I", she was crowned again as best actress in a motion picture drama for playing Elizabeth II in "The Queen".

"In 1952, a woman called Elizabeth Windsor walked into literally the role of a lifetime, and I honestly think this award belongs to her because I think you fell in love with her, not with me," a regal Mirren said.

If any one movie felt the love at the ceremonies, it was "Dreamgirls", which won supporting trophies for Jennifer Hudson and Eddie Murphy and was named best musical or comedy.

Pointing out that the Broadway show on which the film was based is 25 years old, producer Laurence Mark credited DreamWorks co-chairman David Geffen for saying yes to the adaptation. "I sometimes think the movie was not meant to happen until now so that these stars could align and so that (director) Bill Condon could be the one to guide them," an elated Mark said.

Producer-director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu took a global view of "Babel"'s win as best drama. It was presented to him by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, still on crutches from a recent skiing accident. The ensemble drama about miscommunication was shot on three continents in five languages, but Inarritu declared, "The power of cinema is unique, and at the end, emotion doesn't need translation. That's the beauty of it."

Paramount Pictures chairman Brad Grey had reason to enjoy the evening. Paramount produced "Dreamgirls" with DreamWorks, which is now a division of Paramount, and distributed the film. And Paramount's specialty division, Paramount Vantage, earned a place in the spotlight with "Babel".

Forest Whitaker, who was nominated once before for 1988's "Bird", appeared overwhelmed when he prevailed as best actor in a drama for playing Idi Amin in "The Last King of Scotland". He admitted he was "really happy to be included in the company of Leo (DiCaprio) and Will (Smith) and Peter O'Toole and Leo once again," he said. Among those he thanked was "Scotland" screenwriter Peter Morgan, who took home the best screenplay award for "The Queen", which he also penned.

Martin Scorsese earned his second Golden Globe as best director for the crime drama "The Departed". "I'm going to talk a little faster than I normally do," he said with the ceremony running dangerously long. He joked that he started out to make a movie like such vintage Warner Bros. Pictures crime dramas as "Public Enemy" and "Angels With Dirty Faces" but "ended up making 'Devils With Dirty Faces.' "

For her turn as the fearsome magazine editor Miranda Priestly in "The Devil Wears Prada", Meryl Streep picked up her sixth Golden Globe -- though she never had won before as best comedic actress. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Adriana Barraza

14 January 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- You would think that her intrinsic understanding for the character she plays and consequently, commanding screen performance that she delivered meant that Alejandro González Iñárritu only had her in mind for the role of Amelia, but unlike her costar Gael Garcia Bernal (with whom she has been paired with on a second occasion) the Madre of Mexico’s New film wave still needed to do prove that the role was a right fit for her. Talking to her (via phone and helpful interpreter) I got a sense that while the accolades at this time of the year are pleasant, that this was the sort of rare lifetime role that as the saying goes “comes once in a blue moon”.Back at a time when the Babel was in its infancy stage, Adriana Bazzara was busy filming, difficult to reach and in Argentina. I could tell in the actresses’ bubbly »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Queen' rules over BAFTA nominations

12 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

LONDON -- Stephen Frears' "The Queen" crowned its commercial and critical success on Friday, garnering 10 nominations including best film and best director to lead nominees for the Orange British Academy Film Awards.

The winners will be crowned by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts on Feb. 11.

Just on the regal presence's coat tails was one of Her Majesty's secret servers, James Bond, with the spy's latest outing "Casino Royale" punching its way to nine nominations, including a best actor nomination for Daniel Craig.

To secure this year's best film plaudits, "The Queen" will have to overcome "The Departed", "Babel", "The Last King Of Scotland" and "Little Miss Sunshine".

Frears is up against Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu ("Babel"), Martin Scorsese ("The Departed"), Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris ("Little Miss Sunshine") and Paul Greengrass ("United 93") in the sprint to secure the best director trophy.

Greengrass is also nominated in the best original screenplay category for "United 93" and aims to beat Peter Morgan's script for "The Queen", Guillermo Del Toro's "Pan's Labyrinth" and Michael Arndt's "Little Miss Sunshine" for the writer plaudits.

Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and Paul Haggis are nominated for their "Casino Royale" script in the adapted screenplay section, with William Monahan ("The Departed"), Aline Brosh McKenna ("The Devil Wears Prada"), Peter Morgan and Jeremy Brock ("The Last King Of Scotland") and Patrick Marber ("Notes On A Scandal") also in the running.

Craig's turn as 007 will have to punch out the challenges of Leonardo DiCaprio ("The Departed"), Richard Griffiths ("The History Boys"), Peter O'Toole ("Venus") and Forest Whitaker ("The Last King Of Scotland") to win best actor plaudits.

Best actress will be picked from Penelope Cruz ("Volver"), Judi Dench ("Notes On A Scandal"), Helen Mirren ("The Queen"), Meryl Streep ("The Devil Wears Prada") and Kate Winslet ("Little Children").

Aside from its best film, original screenplay and best direction nominations, "Little Miss Sunshine" also secured a trio of performance slots.

The movie's Alan Arkin takes his place in the race for best supporting actor while Abigail Breslin and Toni Colette go up against one another in the best supporting actress section.

Also nominated for best supporting actor are James McAvoy ("Last King"), Jack Nicholson ("Departed"), Leslie Phillips ("Venus") and Michael Sheen ("The Queen"). Breslin and Colette's competition for best support actress are Emily Blunt ("Prada"), Frances de La Tour ("History Boys") and Jennifer Hudson ("Dreamgirls").

It?s all change for this year's ceremony, which will be presented by British television chat show host and media personality Jonathan Ross, although BAFTA top brass is dotting the eyes and crossing the tees with the star, insiders said. Ross replaces writer, actor and comedian Stephen Fry and will present the awards from this year's venue, the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden.

But some things remain the same. Cellular phone company Orange is sponsoring the awards for the tenth year in a row, and the ceremony itself will, for the seventh year running, have a pre-Oscar date and be broadcast live on BBC1.

BAFTA chairman Hilary Bevan-Jones and actor Chiwetel Ejiofor ("Kinky Boots") announced the nominations at BAFTA's Piccadilly headquarters, with 10 categories going out live on BBC television for the third year.

There wasn't much surprise at the list from the gathered filmmakers, distributors and publicists, although the absence of "Children Of Men" from the major categories aside from cinematography and no mention of "Borat" was mentioned. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Directors Nominated for DGA Prize

10 January 2007 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Martin Scorsese and Bill Condon are among the five moviemakers who will fight for this year's Directors Guild of America top prize. The filmmakers, who shot The Departed and Dreamgirls respectively, join Babel director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Stephen Frears (The Queen) and Jonathan Dayton & Valerie Faris - the husband and wife team behind Little Miss Sunshine - on the newly-announced shortlist. The winner of the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for 2006 will be announced at the organization's 59th Annual Awards Dinner on February 3. Of the 58 times the DGA Award has been handed out, only six winners did not go on to pick up the Best Director Oscar. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Producers Guild of America Noms!

3 January 2007 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- The 18th annual Producers Guild of America selected its nominees and the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures will be one of the following:  Babel (Alejandro González IñárrituSteve GolinJon Kilik) The Departed (Graham KingDreamgirls (Laurence Mark)Little Miss Sunshine (Marc TurtletaubDavid T. FriendlyPeter Saraf,  Albert Berger & Ron Yerxa)The Queen (Andy HarriesChristine LanganTracey Seaward) »

Permalink | Report a problem


Board of Review votes 'Iwo Jima' best picture

3 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- Fact-based fiction ruled this year's National Board of Review selections as Clint Eastwood's Japan-centric World War II drama Letters From Iwo Jima took home best film of the year honors.

Forest Whitaker nabbed best actor for his role as Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland, and Helen Mirren ruled as best actress for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen.

Pedro Almodovar's Volver was named best foreign film, Davis Guggenheim's An Inconvenient Truth earned best documentary, John Lasseter and Joe Ranft's Cars won best animated film, and Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, which topped the list of winners with three awards, including a place on the top 10 best film list and a best ensemble cast award.

The NBR's top 10 films, led by Iwo Jima, are Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Babel, Edward Zwick's Blood Diamond, Departed, David Frankel's The Devil Wears Prada, Eastwood's Iwo Jima companion film Flags of Our Fathers, Nicholas Hytner's The History Boys, Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris' Little Miss Sunshine, Richard Eyre's Notes on a Scandal and John Curran's The Painted Veil.

Two much-discussed Oscar contenders, Dreamgirls and Queen, were overlooked on the top 10 list by a group that has been mired in controversy in recent years over the qualifications of its voters, who allegedly have given awards out to appease various studios.

This year, four of the top 10 films are from Warner Bros. Pictures, and one is from subsidiary Warner Independent Pictures, while three are from Fox Searchlight and one is from its sister studio, 20th Century Fox. »

Permalink | Report a problem


ICM vet Newman exits agency

3 January 2007 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Robert Newman, head of motion pictures at ICM and a 17-year veteran of the agency whose clients include directors Robert Rodriguez, Guillermo Del Toro, Baz Luhrmann and Danny Boyle, has left ICM to join Endeavor as a partner, both agencies confirmed Wednesday.

Newman said he expects that Del Toro, Rodriguez, Luhrmann and Boyle will follow him to the 12-year-old agency, which already reps such A-list helmers as Martin Scorsese, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and Michael Moore. The fate of such Newman clients as Jonathan Demme, Mike Figgis, Brian Helgeland, John Hodge, Paul McGuigan, Iain Softley, Todd Solondz, Whit Stillman and Lee Tamahori remains up in the air.

Also joining Newman as a partner at Endeavor is former ICM television lit agent Matt Solo, who left ICM last month. At ICM, Solo's clients included top showrunners David Shore (Fox's House) and Shawn Ryan (FX's The Shield). It is unclear if he will take those clients with him. Although ICM said the agency continues to rep Solo's roster, sources said Ryan likely will follow Solo to Endeavor. »

Permalink | Report a problem


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

20 items from 2007


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners