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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 84 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Legion’ & ‘Fargo’ Stunt Coordinator Guy Bews On Executing A ‘Revenant’-Like One-Take Sequence In Two Days

23 June 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Watching the elaborate action sequences in FX’s unorthodox superhero series Legion, there is a texture and a level of complexity which brings one particular film to mind: Alejandro González Iñárritu’s 2016 Best Picture nominee, The Revenant. This is no coincidence—working on that film, Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar and Inception, and the upcoming War for the Planet of the Apes, stunt coordinator Guy Bews has brought a new level of cinematic stunt coordination to… »

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More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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Cannes Winning Best Actor and Lanthimos' Quirky 'Family' Thriller Academy Award Chances?

20 June 2017 7:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'120 Beats per Minute' trailer: Robin Campillo's AIDS movie features plenty of drama and a clear sociopolitical message. AIDS drama makes Pedro Almodóvar cry – but will Academy members tear up? (See previous post re: Cannes-Oscar connection.) In case France submits it to the 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, screenwriter-director Robin Campillo's AIDS drama 120 Beats per Minute / 120 battements par minute, about the Paris Act Up chapter in the early 1990s, could quite possibly land a nomination. The Grand Prix (Cannes' second prize), international film critics' Fipresci prize, and Queer Palm winner offers a couple of key ingredients that, despite its gay sex scenes, should please a not insignificant segment of the Academy membership: emotionalism and a clear sociopolitical message. When discussing the film after the presentation of the Palme d'Or, Pedro Almodóvar (and, reportedly, jury member Jessica Chastain) broke into tears. Some believed, in fact, that 120 Beats per Minute »

- Steph Mont.

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Sundance London 2017: Walking Out review

5 June 2017 6:25 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Hannah Woodhead

In some parts of America, hunting with your father is a given. In England it can be difficult to comprehend the idea of trudging up a mountain to shoot some birds or moose with your old man – the whole idea feels very cinematic, very Last of the Mohicans or The Deer Hunter. It’s no surprise then that there have been plenty of films over the years that have used big game hunting as a central part of their story, most recently Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s The Revenant in 2015. Walking Out is the latest in a noble tradition of American films made about the subject, and in many ways bears similarities to Iñárritu’s film, but unfortunately, can’t replicate that which made The Revenant such a success.

Taking place in the present day, Walking Out sees fourteen-year-old David travel from his home in Texas to spend time with his father Cal, »

- Hannah Woodhead

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LatinoBuzz, Cannes

4 June 2017 10:37 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As the star-studded Cannes 70th anniversary gala dinner wrapped up on May 23, a mariachi band came out to play “Cielito lindo,” “México lindo y querido,” and the Spanish version of “Happy Birthday” turning this year’s Cannes Film Festival into a celebration of #MexiCannes.2017 Cannes.. Photograph by Justin Bishop. Salma Hayek wears Yves Saint Laurent and a Boucheron necklace. Francois-Henri Pinault wears Gucci.Read more in Remezcla here. In a few red-tinted videos, Salma Hayek, Guillermo del Toro, Emmanuel Lubezki, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, and BFFs Diego Luna and Gael García Bernal can be seen gathering around Table 46 to sing along with the mariachis. They also attracted other celebrities like Isabelle Huppert and quickly became the center of attention. As they loudly sang, a larger group surrounded them and recorded them on their phones. And with GdT giving the performance of a lifetime, it’s hard to blame onlookers. »

- Sydney Levine

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Cannes 2017 Dispatch: Next Vr Round Up

3 June 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

To call the Cannes Film Festival one of the most elitist film festivals on the calendar is not an unfair assessment. This is doubly true when it came to this year's first ever Vr entry into the official program. It was nigh on impossible to get a screening slot for the offsite Vr experience by Alejandro González Iñárritu, Carne Y Arena. Therefore, you're not going to find anything about that here. But just because that piece was the only "official" Vr piece in the festival, that's not to say there wasn't plenty of Vr to see at Cannes. In fact, the Cannes Marche du Film's Next Vr program has grown to be one of the largest exhibitions of Vr in the world. This year it...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Cannes In Progress — 2nd of 3

29 May 2017 12:22 PM, PDT | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As we pass the halfway mark, several new developments of the Cannes International Film Festival seem to have more importance in some ways than the traditional Films in Competition which so far are “interesting” if lacking a bit in luster…

A jury of international critics gathered together by the top international trade paper, Screen International, keeps its own score of the 20 Competition Films as does Film Francais whose critics are all French. Thus far 13 have screened and on a scale of 4 (Excellent) to 0 (Bad), Screen’s highest scoring film so far is 3.2 for the French-Russian coproduction “Loveless” about a bitterly out-of-love couple going through a divorce who must team up to find their son who has disappeared during one of their brutal arguments. Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev and funded independently because the Russian government so disliked his 2014 Competition Film, “Leviathan” ( for which it had put up 35% of the funding), that »

- Sydney Levine

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Oscar Race at Cannes: Here Are the Winners and Losers

28 May 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

After all the red-carpet lineups, anxious security delays, gala black-tie dinners, multilingual press conferences, beachside afterparties, and yacht interviews, who came out ahead at Cannes? Several international filmmakers emerged with higher profiles; hot-ticket English-language title “The Florida Project” finally sold (after days of price-lowering anxiety) to American indie du jour A24 — but when it came to Oscars, Cannes delivered only a handful of contenders.

The lion’s share of this year’s downbeat program, rife with suicidal tendencies and abused children, will never be heard from again stateside. The most entertaining material came from two TV sequels from favorite Cannes auteurs: David Lynch’s return to “Twin Peaks” and Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake: China Girl,” starring Elisabeth Moss and the ubiquitous Nicole Kidman, who took home a well-deserved special Cannes jury prize on Sunday.

And Mexico’s Three Amigos, with no feature films in the selection, »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscar Race at Cannes: Here Are the Winners and Losers

28 May 2017 12:30 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After all the red-carpet lineups, anxious security delays, gala black-tie dinners, multilingual press conferences, beachside afterparties, and yacht interviews, who came out ahead at Cannes? Several international filmmakers emerged with higher profiles; hot-ticket English-language title “The Florida Project” finally sold (after days of price-lowering anxiety) to American indie du jour A24 — but when it came to Oscars, Cannes delivered only a handful of contenders.

The lion’s share of this year’s downbeat program, rife with suicidal tendencies and abused children, will never be heard from again stateside. The most entertaining material came from two TV sequels from favorite Cannes auteurs: David Lynch’s return to “Twin Peaks” and Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake: China Girl,” starring Elisabeth Moss and the ubiquitous Nicole Kidman, who took home a well-deserved special Cannes jury prize on Sunday.

And Mexico’s Three Amigos, with no feature films in the selection, »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes 2017 verdict and awards predictions: a festival of sorrow, strength and middle-class woes | Peter Bradshaw

26 May 2017 10:30 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This year’s event took in the migrant crisis, Russian authoritarianism, sulky sculptors – and even introduced us to a loveable pig. There was plenty to enjoy

This year’s Cannes had its overriding theme imposed from without: terrorism. The festival was widely and solidly shocked by the news from Manchester, and the director Thierry Frémaux made an affecting speech from the Palais stage about the need to stand firm with that city and asked for a minute’s silence. Delegates were coming up to Brits all the time and expressing their sympathy. Cannes had had its own scare earlier in the week: a stray bag spotted in an empty auditorium. In went security staff with dogs, a reminder of how convulsed France has been by terrorist outrage – particularly up the coast, in Nice.

But otherwise, the themes of Cannes revolved around the three Rs: refugees, Russia and the ruin of the middle class. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Cannes: ‘The Summit’s’ Santiago Mitre on Fiction in Politics, Politics in Fiction

25 May 2017 9:50 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — World premiering in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, the third feature from Argentine Santiago Mitre (“The Student,” “Paulina”) follows an Argentine President (Ricardo Darín) at a Latin American summit, who is conflicted on a political and personal level. Dolores Fonzi (“Paulina”) plays his daughter, Elena Anaya an Oriana Fallaci-ish journalist, Christian Slater a U.S. diplomat. Sold internationally by Film Factory Ent., “The Summit” is produced by  K & S (Pablo Trapero’s “The Clan”), La Union de los Rios (“Paulina,” “The Student”) Spain’s Mod Producciones (Alejandro González Iñárritu’s “Biutiful”) and France’s Maneki Films (Pablo Trapero’s “White Elephant”).  “The Summit” marks a step-up into a far higher-profile production from the Cannes 2015 Critics’ Week winner and co-writer of “White Elephant”. “The Summit” will be released in the U.S. in August via Warner Bros. Pictures.

What drive you to make “The Summit,” a political thriller-drama, what interests you about politics? »

- Emilio Mayorga

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Benedict Cumberbatch mindfulness documentary scores key deals

23 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Us, Germany, Australia, Latin America among deals for ‘Walk With Me’.

WestEnd Films has closed key deals on Benedict Cumberbatch-narrated mindfulness documentary Walk With Me, which premiered at SXSW.

The Speakit Films’ title is directed by Marc J. Francis (Black Gold) and Max Pugh (The Road to Freedom Peak).

Rights have gone to the Us, as part of a co-acquisition between Gathr Films and Kino Lorber, to Benelux (Cinemien), Germany, Austria and Switzerland (Dcm), Australia and New Zealand (Village Roadshow), Latin America (Energia), Italy (Feltrinelli), Japan (Gaga), China (Jetsen Huashi Wangju Cultural Media Co), Hong Kong (Cinehub), Korea (Tcast), Taiwan (Encore) and Thailand (Doc Club).

Shot over three years, Walk With Me goes deep inside a Zen Buddhist community which practices the art of mindfulness with their famous teacher Thich Nhat Hanh.

Footage of the monastic life is paired with Cumberbatch reading from insights from Thich Nhat Hanh’s early journals.

The Revenant and Birdman »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Iñárritu shines in Cannes Vr push

23 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Carne y Arena was the highlight of this year’s Vr crop at the festival.

Alejandro González Iñárritu’s lauded Carne y Arena was the star of Cannes’ Vr offering this year but the Marche’s innovation hub Next also offered up plenty of debate and experiences.

Among companies to showcase Vr compilation experiences were Arte, Telefilm Canada, Cnc and China’s Polyhedron Vr Studio.

San Francisco-based operation Penrose Studios screened the first episode of Arden’s Wake, an immersive 15-minute experience, which tells the story of a young girl living with her father in a lighthouse.

The experience was created with Penrose’s software Maestro, which allows their development team to fully collaborate in a virtual space.

Read: ‘The Revenant’ director Iñárritu’s Cannes Vr project: report

Meanwhile, Zach Richter of Within screened an immersive 360 rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah, using Lytro’s Immerge camera.

In the booked-out interactive effort Ximoan, part of the »

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Carne y Arena review - dazzling virtual reality exhibit offers a fresh look at the refugee crisis

22 May 2017 1:22 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s latest project is an innovative and immersive account of the horrors faced at the Mexico-us border

Related: The Day After review - Hong Sang-soo's boozy comedy is diverting but slight

So – the envelope is pushed a little further, the limits of cinema questioned a little harder, the rectangular perimeter fence of the movie screen challenged a little bit more confidently.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Alejandro Inarritu’s Vr Experience ‘Carne y Arena’ Shakes Up Cannes Viewers – If They Can See It

21 May 2017 6:41 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Alejandro G. Inarritu and Emmanuel Lubezki are making a splash in the world of virtual reality with their Vr installation “Carne y Arena (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)” but the Oscar-winning director and cinematographer are also playing hard to get at the Cannes Film Festival. Although the work is part of the official selection, the first Vr experience to make that prestigious cut, it is playing not in the Palais or elsewhere along the Croisette, but in a warehouse space 15 minutes west of town, near the small Aeroport Cannes Mandelieu. But you can’t just show up with your badge and. »

- Steve Pond

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The Birth Of An Art Form: How Alejandro G. Iñárritu And Emmanuel Lubezki Learned To Master Virtual Reality – Cannes

21 May 2017 5:44 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

At an airport hangar on the French Riviera, Alejandro G. Iñárritu and Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki are presenting a project that promises to birth an entirely new medium. Previous experiments with virtual reality have been promising, delivering a mix of cinema and gaming in an immersive technology that allows viewers a 360-degree field of view. But with Carne y Arena, an installation piece that has become the first virtual reality project to be officially selected by the Canne… »

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Willem Dafoe To Star In Vincent Van Gogh Biopic At Eternity’S Gate

20 May 2017 5:50 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“When facing a flat landscape I see nothing but eternity. Am I the only one to see it?” “Existence can’t be without reason.” – Vincent Van Gogh, 1888

Rocket Science announced today that Golden Globe Winner Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Before Night Falls) will direct At Eternity’S Gate, which will star Academy Award Nominee Willem Dafoe (Spider-Man, John Wick) as Vincent van Gogh.

Based on a screenplay by Schnabel and Jean-Claude Carrière, the story focuses on the time in Vincent’s life that he spent in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Academy Award Nominee Jon Kilik (The Hunger Games franchise, Babel) will produce the film, which will be shot on location in France. Rocket Science is handling international sales and CAA is representing the U.S rights.

“This is a film about painting and a painter and their relationship to infinity. It is told by a painter. »

- Michelle Hannett

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Cannes: BondIt Invests in Abs Entertainment Payroll and Production Accounting (Exclusive)

20 May 2017 3:46 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Entertainment finance firm BondIt Media Capital has finalized a strategic investment into Abs Entertainment Payroll & Production Accounting Services, Variety has learned exclusively.

The deal was announced Saturday at the Cannes Film Festival, where BondIt’s projects include Rob Reiner’s “Shock and Awe,” being sold by Voltage; “Finding Steve McQueen,” starring Travis Fimmel and Forest Whitaker, being sold by Ambi; and “All The Devil’s Men,” starring Milo Gibson and Sylvia Hoeks being sold by Gfm.

Related

Cannes Virtual Reality Review: Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s ‘Carne y Arena’

The alliance will allow for expansion of the firms’ joint services. Abs Payroll services up to 700 entertainment productions annually within the independent film community. BondIt and Abs will join forces to offer entertainment productions a one-stop-solution from payroll through senior financing. Kris King will take over as president of the Abs Payroll division running the daily operations.

BondIt is thrilled to join »

- Dave McNary

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Cannes Virtual Reality Review: Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s ‘Carne y Arena’

20 May 2017 8:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s always funny to hear how audiences, in 1903, reacted to the outrageous final shot of Edwin S. Porter’s eight-minute film “The Great Train Robbery.” The leader of the film’s outlaw gang, Bronco Billy Anderson, points a gun right at the camera — at the audience — and shoots. People who first saw that thought a gun was actually being fired at them, and so they scrambled to get out of the way. How quaint! But when you experience “Carne y Arena,” the extraordinary six-and-a-half-minute virtual-reality installation that director  is presenting at the Cannes Film Festival (an earlier version was mounted in Los Angeles), you may find yourself having a similar reaction.

It’s pre-dawn, and you’re alone, in the middle of the scrubby vastness of the Sonoran Desert, and when I say in the middle of that’s not a figure of speech. You’re there, staring out at the gray horizon, »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Why Alejandro González Iñárritu is the Director Who Finally Got Vr Right — Cannes 2017

20 May 2017 7:25 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Count on Alejandro González Iñárritu to be at the forefront of a new genre. “It is not cinema,” he told me Thursday after I experienced his extraordinary Vr immersion “Carne Y Arena” at a special warehouse installation 30 minutes outside of Cannes.

Here’s why “Carne y Arena” is amazing — but it’s not a movie.

It’s a museum installation

The six-and-a-half minute Vr piece is only part of the display that will be mounted (on a grander and more elegant scale) first in June at the Prada Foundation in Milan and then in July at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, followed by other museums around the world.

“If people come here with idea to see a short film, it’s wrong,” he said. “It’s like taking two hours to go to the Biennale in Venice. That’s how you have to see it, to experience it »

- Anne Thompson

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