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1-20 of 52 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Pranks Ensue in First Trailer For Maren Ade’s Cannes Hit ‘Toni Erdmann’

21 July 2016 9:02 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“I think it’s not a pure comedy in the sense that the father does funny things for a sad reason. It’s not that I’ve just taken it upon myself to tell jokes with this film,” director Maren Ade told us at Cannes when it came to crafting one of the most well-received films of the festival, Toni Erdmann. Her follow-up to Everyone Else concerns Winfried (Peter Simonischek), who plays bizarre, awkward pranks on his daughter, Ines (Sandra Hüller), and today we have the first international trailer.

As we said in our review, “Maren Ade has kept us waiting. It’s been seven years since her superb second feature Everyone Else premiered at the Berlinale, taking home the Jury Prize, and she’s spent the interim collaborating on the production of other people’s films (e.g. Miguel Gomes’) rather than releasing one of her own. Now that »

- Jordan Raup

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What Movie Gives You Hope For The Future? — Critics Survey

11 July 2016 9:40 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, the CriticWire Survey asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday morning. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What movie gives you hope for the future?

Miriam Bale (@mimbale), Freelance

No movie gives me hope for the future right now. What a question! Is that what movies are supposed to do?

But this is the most important piece of film criticism I’ve read this year, and the writing gives me some kind of hope for intellectual direction in what may be revolutionary times.

Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse), Rolling Stone

As my sweet mama used to tell me as I slumbered in my crib, “Hope is for dopes!” The vast majority of movies that aim for a hopeful aftertaste »

- David Ehrlich

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Day for Night: "Arabian Nights" via "Out 1"

21 June 2016 6:09 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Out 1The late, great Jacques Rivette’s long-unseen serial Out 1 (1971) begins in a state of febrile convulsion, a seizure or shared hallucination, a frenzied, excruciating, hypnotic baptism of fire that reveals Rivette’s many-headed monster entering into being. Indistinguishable in a mass and huddle of contradicting limbs, this theatre troupe of performers – enchanted, ever-improvising movers and shakers – then pack their bags, tidy up, and leave one Parisian rehearsal space for another. Never too far away from each other in this 20-arrondissement Venn-diagram, and never inseparable, the circumstances of individual characters are slowly knitted together, first those of a character played by Juliet Berto, then one by Jean-Pierre Léaud. Individual narratives become interdependent, and Out 1 becomes a multi-plot film. Just as two theatre troupes use various imaginative, improvisational means to adapt two of Aeschylus’s Greek tragedies, Berto and Léaud’s two outliers approach and endlessly orbit some central conspiracy or secret underground society. »

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Tribute to Lgbtq Cinema, Jonny Greenwood Talk, Robby Müller Masterclass, and More

13 June 2016 1:20 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Watch Fandor’s tribute to Lgbtq cinema:

Our friends at Screen Slate, the top resource for NYC repertory screenings, have debuted a slick-looking new website.

Av Club‘s Jesse Hassenger on how Noah Baumbach helped Greta Gerwig become a brilliant soloist:

Baumbach, working with the late cinematographer Harris Savides, shoots Gerwig with a kind of watchful affection, getting in close as she drives around doing work errands, a hazy Los Angeles sun hitting the windows and Steve Miller Band’s “Jet Airliner” playing. “Are you going to let me in?” she asks another driver in talking-to-herself tones. This is one of the first shots of the movie, which follows Florence for a full eight minutes before introducing Stiller’s title character. In retrospect, it seems like Baumbach is tipping his hand about his interest in Gerwig. His instincts are dead-on; putting Gerwig at the front of the movie allows a hesitant character to make a vivid impression before smashing her into Stiller’s prickly garden of hang-ups and neuroses. Their romantic scrabbling, including a profoundly unsexy sort of sex scene, maintains the uncertainty of mumblecore but with a more articulate form of mumbling.

Listen to a one-hour talk with Jonny Greenwood on his Paul Thomas Anderson collaborations and more:

New York Times‘ Nina Siegal on how Robby Müller created the look of indie film classics, plus watch a masterclass from the director:

For Mr. McQueen, Mr. Müller developed a visual language to capture what appear to be men falling to their deaths in slow motion — a reference to the 1651 suicides of Carib Indians who leapt off a cliff rather than submit to their French colonizers on the island of Grenada, where Mr. McQueen’s parents were born. “Caribs’ Leap’’ is included in the exhibition.

The New Yorker‘s Richard Brody lists his 50 favorite foreign language films of the 21st century:

Ultimately, the movies on the list point forward to the future of the art, even if some of that future has already slipped into the past. The Chinese cinema has experienced, in this century, an outpouring of creative energy, thanks to the films of Jia Zhangke and other independent filmmakers there. I hope that the independent Chinese cinema will survive the government’s current wave of censorship and repression. In the Portuguese cinema, the baton has passed from Manoel de Oliveira and João César Monteiro to Pedro Costa and Miguel Gomes; the Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, a one-man wave, has been followed by Jafar Panahi and Samira Makhmalbaf. It remains to be seen whether Romania’s one great filmmaker, Corneliu Porumboiu, will be able to coax that country’s rising industry away from its run of script-bound, Euro-generic social realism; whether Hong Sang-soo, currently the subject of a complete retrospective at Museum of the Moving Image, will inspire other filmmakers in South Korea; whether the Mauritanian director Abderrahmane Sissako (who has worked often in Mali as well) and the Chadian director Mahamat-Saleh Haroun will inspire a younger generation of filmmakers in those countries; and whether Germany, which saw its modern tradition broken by the death of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, the emigration of Werner Herzog, and the self-diminution-through-cultural-ambassadorship of Wim Wenders, will again become a spawning ground for daring young filmmakers.

Watch a video featuring BBC’s 100 greatest American films:

See more Dailies.

»

- The Film Stage

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Embrace of the Serpent Review

8 June 2016 3:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

  There are shades of Miguel Gomes’ breathtaking Tabu to Ciro Guerra’s third feature film Embrace of the Serpent. Perhaps it’s just because it’s presented in monochrome and is completely spellbinding – or maybe it’s because it’s a tremendously absorbing affair, and though enchanting in parts and visual striking throughout, the colonialist themes provide a […]

The post Embrace of the Serpent Review appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Stefan Pape

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Mubi acquires Cannes winner 'Olli Maki'; Bruno Dumont's 'Slack Bay'

2 June 2016 5:58 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Streaming service acquires rights for Us and UK.

Global streaming service Mubi has secured theatrical and digital rights to a brace of buzz titles from this year’s Cannes Film Festival: The Happiest Day In the Life Of Olli Maki, which won the Un Certain Regard prize, and Bruno Dumont’s Cannes Competition title Slack Bay.

The curated VOD service has acquired rights for the Us and UK/Eire on Olli Maki and has also acquired Svod window rights for the film in Latin America.

The film marks the feature debut of Finland’s Juho Kuosmanen and tells the true story of Finnish boxing hero, Olli Mäki as he attempts to win the world championship featherweight title in the summer of 1962.

Slack Bay

For Slack Bay, Mubi has taken theatrical, home entertainment and digital rights in the UK/Eire, and the film will be released in partnership with New Wave Films, marking their second »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Streaming Site Mubi Takes U.K./Ireland, U.S. Rights to Cannes Un Certain Regard Winner ‘Olli Maki’

2 June 2016 5:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Curated video-on-demand service Mubi has taken U.K./Ireland and U.S. rights to “The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki,” the feature debut of Finland’s Juho Kuosmanen, which took the top prize in this year’s Un Certain Regard section at Cannes.

Mubi has also acquired subscription VOD window rights for the film in Latin America.

Mubi has additionally taken theatrical, home entertainment and digital rights in the U.K./Ireland for the three-time Palme d’Or nominee Bruno Dumont’s Cannes Competition comedy, “Ma Loute.” The film will be released in partnership with New Wave Films, their second partnership after Miguel Gomes’ trilogy “Arabian Nights,” which opened in April. New Wave has released three of Dumont’s previous films: “Hadewijch,” “Hors Satan” and “P’tit Quinquin.”

The release date in cinemas and on Mubi is to be confirmed for both features.

“The Happiest Day »

- Leo Barraclough

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Arabian Nights: satire meets Scheherazade in epic Portuguese trilogy

28 May 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Miguel Gomes explores his country’s austerity years via myth and dick jokes

While the giants of the streaming world duke it out over Ashton Kutcher sitcoms and Top Gear rehashes, Mubi is singlehandedly realising the potential that subscription services have to push viewers beyond their comfort zones. Alongside its usual roster of arthouse favourites and Hollywood oddities, the platform has had exclusive online premieres for a Paul Thomas Anderson documentary, a key work of the contemporary Canadian avant garde (88.88), and now Arabian Nights, the acclaimed three-volume opus from Portugal’s Miguel Gomes.

Related: Arabian Nights Vol 1: The Restless One review – resistance through filmic poetry

Continue reading »

- Charlie Lyne

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Cannes hits 'Toni Erdmann', 'Sieranevada' secure sales

15 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: German comedy Toni Erdmann is attracting buyers following a strong critical reception.

Buyers are stampeding to acquire Maren Ade’s comedy Toni Erdmann – one of the few German films to screen in Competition in Cannes in recent years – following a rapturous reception and glowing reviews.

Pim Hermeling’s September Films has snapped up Benelux rights, while Haut et Court is already on board for France and Filmcoopi Zurich has Switzerland.

Last night, Sony Pictures Classics swooped on North American and Latin American rights.

Sales agent The Match Factory anticipates further details on the comedy, which recorded the highest score to date on Screen International’s jury grid.

It has been seven years since Ade’s Berlin Silver Bear winner Everyone Else, an edgy relationship drama that scored distribution in more than 20 countries. Her third feature, Toni Erdmann, is another in-depth character study about a music teacher who tries to correct the over-serious nature of his career-focused »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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New on Netflix: May 2016

15 May 2016 2:58 PM, PDT | FilmJunk | See recent FilmJunk news »

We’ve got a little over a month’s worth of Netflix additions to catch up on, so let’s dive in and see what’s currently streaming in the U.S. and Canada. The biggest new arrivals in the U.S. include the family friendly flicks Goosebumps and Minions plus Miguel Gomes’ three-part epic Arabian Nights and the first season […] »

- Sean

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[Cannes Review] Toni Erdmann

15 May 2016 5:39 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Maren Ade has kept us waiting. It’s been seven years since her superb second feature Everyone Else premiered at the Berlinale, taking home the Jury Prize, and she’s spent the interim collaborating on the production of other people’s films (e.g. Miguel Gomes’) rather than releasing one of her own. Now that her new directorial effort is finally here, it validates all the eager anticipation, as Toni Erdmann is one of the most stirring cinematic experiences to come around in a long time.

For Toni Erdmann’s first third or so, Ade seems to be revisiting similar territory to that of her excellent, albeit little-seen, debut feature, The Forest for the Trees. The two films’ protagonists are kindred spirits: profoundly kind and well-meaning persons whose obstinate insistence on thrusting their support onto others, oblivious to the fact that it isn’t welcome, borders on the pathetic. The »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Toni Erdmann’

13 May 2016 3:46 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There are sides of ourselves — reckless ones, ruthless ones, occasionally hopeless ones — that we never want our parents to see, even, or perhaps especially, in adulthood. What we rarely consider is the equal number of imperfect facets — incompetence, insecurity, simple loneliness — that our parents do their best to conceal from us. And so the hidden half-lives of a civilly estranged father and daughter overlap to uproarious and finally devastating effect in “Toni Erdmann,” a stunningly singular third feature by German writer-director Maren Ade that transports the intricately magnified human observation of her previous work to a rich, unexpected comic realm.

At 162 minutes, this episodic, slow-building study of reluctantly shared depression is baggy, yes, but necessarily so: The film takes precisely as much time as it needs for its muddled, maddeningly human characters, played with extraordinary courage and invention by Peter Simonischek and Sandra Hüller, to find their way into each other, »

- Guy Lodge

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Across The Croisette: A Brief History of the Directors' Fortnight

12 May 2016 6:37 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Last year, the three-part, six-hours-and-twenty-two minutes long epic Arabian Nights by Portuguese director Miguel Gomes rejected a slot in the Cannes Film Festival’s second-rung Un Certain Regard section, opting instead to be premiered  at the Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalisateurs ), taking place in the same French Riviera city at the same time. Why wasn’t Arabian Nights in Cannes’ official competition? Gomes’ previous film, Tabu, won two prizes at the Berlin International Film Festival, finished 2nd Sight & Sound’s and Cinema Scope’s polls of the best films of 2012, 10th in the Village Voice’s, and 11th in both Film Comment’s and Indiewire’s; he was exactly the kind of rising art-house star who should have been competing in the most prominent part of the official festival. But organizers balked at the idea of offering such a lengthy film a slot in competition where two or three others could be chosen, »

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Open Access Drives New Media Program Initiatives

10 May 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

While much coverage of the European Union’s Media Program focuses on its extensive contribution to European film production, its investment in the audiovisual sector extends far past a project’s final cut. Other initiatives within the program have been built to aid distribution and promotion of films across the continent — keeping pace, too, with the rapid evolution of digital distribution models.

As Media kicked off its 25th-anniversary celebrations at the Berlinale in February, three notable projects funded by the online distribution scheme were showcased. From the U.K., the Curzon Home Cinema VOD platform — an outcrop of the country’s Curzon arthouse theater chain — was celebrated for its advances in multiplatform release strategies: In 2015, more than 60 European films were granted day-and-date releases in cinemas and on VOD via the platform; this year, Curzon Home Cinema’s reach is being extended to over 6.5 million customers.

The Rotterdam Film Festival’s Iffr Live project, »

- Guy Lodge

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Film Review: Arabian Nights: Volume Three

10 May 2016 7:21 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ All good things must come to an end. The Enchanted One is the last piece in the puzzle of Miguel Gomes' Arabian Nights, a rambling odyssey through austerity-hit Portugal via Baghdad in the age of antiquity. Just as enigmatic and eclectic in terms of style, construct and tone as its preceding volumes, the finale plunges deepest into the mystical and mythical origins of the story from which its structure is taken. Volumes One and Two may have had viewers scratching their heads, and this portion of the film is by no means conventional, but there's a musicality and dreamlike quality to The Enchanted One which resonates long after a tremendous tracking shot of Chico Chapas draws this sprawling epic to a close.

»

- CineVue UK

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Arabian Nights: Volume 3 – The Enchanted One review – a limp last tale

8 May 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Miguel Gomes’s three-part modern Portuguese version of Scheherezade’s stories concludes on a flat note

Anyone who has already sat through the cumulative 257 minutes of Volumes 1 and 2 of Miguel Gomes’s idiosyncratic portrait of contemporary Portugal (released in consecutive weeks last month) is unlikely to want to skip the third instalment. However, it is fair to say that this is the least essential of the three films. The narrator Scheherazade (Crista Alfaiate) is fleshed out as a character. Her adventure – a brief escape to an archipelago populated by outlaws – is a playful tangle of anachronisms. But charm dissipates with the final story, an overlong documentary-style portrait of a working-class bird-trapping community. Tonally, it’s reminiscent of Raymond Depardon’s glum portraits of French rural life, spiked with surreal flashes. If this was Scheherazade’s final story, it would have been unlikely to stave off her execution.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

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New to Streaming: ‘The Witch,’ ‘Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party,’ ‘The Family Fang,’ and More

6 May 2016 9:29 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Arabian Nights (Miguel Gomes)

In lauding Miguel Gomes‘ three-part, six-and-a-half hour behemoth, it’s perhaps important to consider his background as a critic. Not just in terms of the trilogy’s cinephilic engagement with Rossellini, Alonso, Oliveira, etc.; also in its defiant nature. While it’s easy to assign the trilogy certain humanist and satirical labels from the get-go and just praise these films for following through on them, »

- TFS Staff

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Arabian Nights, Vol 3: The Enchanted One review – elegant Portuguese austerity marvel

5 May 2016 2:15 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The final part of Miguel Gomes’s docu-fantasy trilogy includes Scheherazade as a romantic warrior queen and an interplanetary Karen Carpenter

Miguel Gomes’s wayward, opaque and sometimes dreamily erotic Arabian Nights docu-fantasy trilogy about Portugal’s austerity nightmare enters its final section, and in this episode, the on-screen intertitles – so sparing in the previous episodes – now recur almost continuously, commenting ironically or enigmatically on the action, quoting the imaginary tale, even transcribing birdsong. Gomes pulls off this asymmetric quirk as insouciantly as he does everything else. Scheherazade (Crista Alfaiate) takes centre stage, the “enchanted one” herself; we see her romantic yearnings and emotional relationship with her father. This emergence confers on her a strange, understated sort of heroism, Portugal’s warrior-queen tribune. Apart from her story, there are two tales: one about chaffinches hints at the reason why the nation’s caged bird sings; another about a lonely young »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party,’ ‘Arabian Nights,’ ‘Virginia Woolf,’ and More

3 May 2016 11:18 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arabian Nights (Miguel Gomes)

In lauding Miguel Gomes‘ three-part, six-and-a-half hour behemoth, it’s perhaps important to consider his background as a critic. Not just in terms of the trilogy’s cinephilic engagement with Rossellini, Alonso, Oliveira, etc.; also in its defiant nature. While it’s easy to assign the trilogy certain humanist and satirical labels from the get-go and just praise these films for following through on them, Gomes continually seeks to mutate and complicate his of age-of-austerity saga. »

- TFS Staff

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Arabian Nights: Volume 2 – The Desolate One review – a portrait of Portugal

1 May 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A dreamlike tour of a nation from director Miguel Gomes, with guides including a cow and a dog

The second instalment of Miguel Gomes’s sprawling state of the Portuguese nation address continues with an allegorical, fantastical journey through a country in crisis. Gomes adds a dreamlike dimension: several strands are viewed through the eyes of animals. A wounded cow gives testimony to a judge who weeps from the cumulative suffering and evil that she witnesses. And a stray dog called Dixie is our entry point to the lives of the impoverished residents of a tower block.

Like the first volume, the film requires an investment on the part of the audience. But the cinematic language in which Gomes is working is immersive rather than strictly narrative. And as such, the occasional lapse of concentration hardly matters.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 52 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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