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Melvin And Howard June 16th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“No one seems to love or understand me. Oh what hard luck stories they all hand me”

Melvin And Howard screens Friday, June 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the third film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Paul Le Mat is an average Joe named Melvin E. Dummar in Melvin And Howard (1980) an effective combination of drama and comedy from director Jonathan Demme. Melvin often finds it difficult to make ends meet, no matter what line of work he’s in. Then, one day, it seems as if his luck might change. A stranger leaves on his desk a will proclaiming Melvin to be one of 16 heirs to the fortune of reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes. Once upon a time, Melvin had given a lift to an aged, decrepit looking individual (Jason Robards) who claimed to be Hughes. The
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art
The great filmmakers who came to prominence in the 1970s — and Jonathan Demme, who died Wednesday, was one of them — had stylistic traits that made them iconically identifiable. Robert Altman had his multi-character hubbub, Martin Scorsese had his volcanic rock ‘n’ roll virtuosity, and Francis Ford Coppola had his lavishly scaled operatic grandeur. But Demme, vivid and stirring as his filmmaking voice was, had no such obvious signature. You could almost say that he was defined by his lack of signature.

What defined a Demme film was the open-eyed flow of its humanity, the way his camera drank in everyone on screen — it didn’t matter whether the character was a goofy truck driver, a derelict billionaire, the troubled wife of a mobster, a new wave rock ‘n’ roller, or a serial killer — and took the full measure of their life and spirit. For Demme, the magic of movies resided
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Jonathan Demme Was One of the Greatest Concert Movie Directors Ever

Why Jonathan Demme Was One of the Greatest Concert Movie Directors Ever
Jonathan Demme's death at the age of 73 prompted an outpouring of online memorials from film lovers who remembered the Oscar-winning director for his varied career: everything from the chilling, intelligent thriller The Silence of the Lambs to the brittle 2008 indie drama Rachel Getting Married. But for music fans, those highlights don't even scratch the surface of what cemented his legacy.

It's not hyperbole to say that Demme was arguably the greatest concert filmmaker ever – look at the number of them that he made, the range of artists he chronicled
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Jonathan Demme’s 10 Best Movies, From ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ to ‘Stop Making Sense’ (Photos)

  • The Wrap
Jonathan Demme’s 10 Best Movies, From ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ to ‘Stop Making Sense’ (Photos)
The Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died at age 73. “Melvin and Howard” (1980) Demme made his directorial debut on the 1974 Roger Corman flick “Caged Heat” but he really emerged with this road trip drama about a man claiming to be Howard Hughes’ heir. The film won two Oscars, for Bo Goldman’s script and Mary Steenburgen’s supporting performance. “Stop Making Sense” (1984) Demme made some of the finest music concert films in the modern era, including this gem of the ’80s legends the Talking Heads. “Something Wild” (1986) Melanie Griffith charms as a free spirit who “kidnaps” Jeff Daniels’ uptight yuppie. “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987) Demme continued.
See full article at The Wrap »

Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73

Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs’ Director, Dies at 73
Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died Wednesday in New York of cancer complications, his publicist told Variety. He was 73 years old.

Demme is best known for directing “The Silence of the Lambs,” the 1991 horror-thriller that was a box office smash, a critical triumph, and introduced moviegoers to Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter, a charismatic serial with a yen for Chianti, fava beans, and cannibalism. The story of a novice FBI analyst (Jodie Foster) on the trail of a murderer became only the third film in history to win Academy Awards in all the top five categories ( picture, actor, actress, director, and adapted screenplay), joining the ranks of “It Happened One Night” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Though he had his greatest success terrifying audiences, most of Demme’s work was looser and quirkier. In particular, he showed a great humanism and an empathy for outsiders in the likes of “Melvin and Howard,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Beatty’s Back: Warren Beatty talks his career and the inspiration behind Rules Don't Apply, and more

  • Cineplex
Beatty’s Back: Warren Beatty talks his career and the inspiration behind Rules Don't Apply, and moreBeatty’s Back: Warren Beatty talks his career and the inspiration behind Rules Don't Apply, and moreBob Strauss - Cineplex Magazine11/24/2016 3:42:00 Pm

We haven’t seen Warren Beatty in a movie for 15 years. The Oscar-winning director hasn’t worked behind the camera — where he’s often written and produced as well — since Bulworth 18 years ago.

Now he’s doing all of those things, and playing the eccentric American business mogul Howard Hughes, in Rules Don’t Apply, a typically jaundiced ode to mid-20th century Hollywood. It’s set around the time when Beatty, then a handsome young man from Virginia, first followed his older sister, Shirley MacLaine, to Los Angeles to try his hand at movies.

“I’ve been very lucky,” acknowledges Beatty, now 79 and dressed casually in a canvas jacket
See full article at Cineplex »

Rules Don’t Apply Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Rules Don’t Apply Movie Review
Rules Don’T Apply 20th Century Fox Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B Director: Warren Beatty Written by: Warren Beatty, Bo Goldman Cast: Warren Beatty, Alden Ehrenrcih, Lily Collins, Annette Bening, Haley Bennett, Candice Bergen, Matthew Broderick Screened at: Regal E-Walk, NYC, 11/10/16 Opens: November 23, 2016 Warren Beatty is back. Can Gene Hackman and Jack Nicholson be far behind? With “Rules Don’t Apply,” the 79-year-old actor-director-producer performs in the role of Howard Hughes, who was the Donald Trump of his time, and apparently just as nutty. During the 1960s, Hughes was more diversified economically than our president-elect, with the Hughes Tool Company serving as holding company for ventures in [ Read More ]

The post Rules Don’t Apply Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview
Last month, Warren Beatty hosted an Academy screening on the Fox lot for his new film, “Rules Don’t Apply.” The actor and Oscar-winning director cheerfully greeted new arrivals, but when he introduced his movie it was in his typically controlling fashion: “It’s not a Howard Hughes biopic!”

People can be forgiven for the mistake. Beatty, 79, has wanted to make a movie about the neurotic aerospace and movie mogul since 1973, when he noticed during a stay at the Beverly Hills Hotel that a room was always occupied by two crewcut men in dark suits. The self-protective movie star thought the hotel was spying on him, but a manager told Beatty that the men worked for Howard Hughes, who at the time reserved seven rooms, plus five private bungalows for his girls.

At the time, Beatty was working with Robert Towne on the Oscar-nominated script of “Shampoo” (1975). Hal Ashby directed
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview

  • Indiewire
Warren Beatty Talks Hollywood Legends, Humanizing Howard Hughes and More in Career-Spanning IndieWire Interview
Last month, Warren Beatty hosted an Academy screening on the Fox lot for his new film, “Rules Don’t Apply.” The actor and Oscar-winning director cheerfully greeted new arrivals, but when he introduced his movie it was in his typically controlling fashion: “It’s not a Howard Hughes biopic!”

People can be forgiven for the mistake. Beatty, 79, has wanted to make a movie about the neurotic aerospace and movie mogul since 1973, when he noticed during a stay at the Beverly Hills Hotel that a room was always occupied by two crewcut men in dark suits. The self-protective movie star thought the hotel was spying on him, but a manager told Beatty that the men worked for Howard Hughes, who at the time reserved seven rooms, plus five private bungalows for his girls.

At the time, Beatty was working with Robert Towne on the Oscar-nominated script of “Shampoo” (1975). Hal Ashby directed
See full article at Indiewire »

Danny DeVito talks highlights, 'Triplets' and directing again

  • ScreenDaily
Danny DeVito talks highlights, 'Triplets' and directing again
Screen interviewed the Us multi-hyphenate who this week receives an Honorary Award in Mallorca.

Danny DeVito has got virtually all bases covered: from stage to screen, shorts to features, comedy to prestige drama.

One of the world’s most recognizable movie stars, the Batman Returns, Twins and L.A. Confidential actor has directed hits includingThrow Momma From The Train and Matilda while producer credits include Oscar winnner Erin Brockovich and Pulp Fiction (as an executive producer). More recently he has starred in long-running FX series It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia.

Across a career spanning almost 50 years, DeVito has been there, done it and got the t-shirt.

The Hollywood icon will be in Spain this week where he is being presented with with the Evolution Mallorca International Film Festival’s (Emiff, November 3-12) Honorary Award in recognition of his career.

DeVito will present screenings of The War Of The Roses and his new short film Curmudgeons, which
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rules Don't Apply Final Trailer: Warren Beatty Takes on Old Hollywood

  • MovieWeb
Rules Don't Apply Final Trailer: Warren Beatty Takes on Old Hollywood
Regency Enterprises and 20th Century Fox have released a new trailer for the Romantic Dramedy Rules Don't Apply. Starring Lily Collins, Alden Ehrenreich and 15 time Academy Award nominee, Warren Beatty, this enticing romantic dramedy follows an aspiring young actress and her ambitious young driver, who struggle hopefully with the absurd eccentricities of a wildly unpredictable billionaire, whom they work for. Check out the trailer below before this Oscar contender hits theaters on November 23!

It's Hollywood, 1958.&#160Small town beauty queen, songwriter, and devout Baptist virgin Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins),&#160under contract to the infamous Howard Hughes (Warren Beatty), arrives in Los Angeles. At the airport, she meets her driver Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich), who is engaged to be married to&#160his 7th grade sweetheart and is a deeply religious Methodist.

Their instant attraction not only puts their religious convictions to the test, but also defies&#160Howard Hughes' #1 rule: no employee is
See full article at MovieWeb »

Rules Don't Apply Trailer: Warren Beatty Is Howard Hughes

  • MovieWeb
Rules Don't Apply Trailer: Warren Beatty Is Howard Hughes
An aspiring young actress and her ambitious young driver struggle hopefully with the absurd eccentricities of the wildly unpredictable billionaire, who they work for in Rules Don't Apply. Lily Collins, Alden Ehrenreich and Warren Beatty star in this awards season hopeful. Today, 20th Century Fox has released the full trailer.

Regency Enterprises and 20th Century Fox present the Romantic Dramedy Rules Don't Apply. It is written, directed and produced by 15 time Academy Award nominee Warren Beatty. In the movie, Marla Mabrey (Lily Collins), under contract to the infamous Howard Hughes (Beatty), arrives in Los Angeles. At the airport, she meets her driver Frank Forbes (Alden Ehrenreich). Their instant attraction defies Hughes' #1 rule: no employee is allowed to have any relationship whatsoever with a contract actress.

Rules Don't Apply is coming to theaters just in time for the holidays, arriving, November 23, 2016. The story was concocted by Warren Beatty alongside Bo Goldman.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Michael Cimino, best remembered for 'Heaven's Gate,' is gone

  • Hitfix
Michael Cimino, best remembered for 'Heaven's Gate,' is gone
There are days where the Internet feels like the most ghoulish game of telephone ever, particularly when the word starts to spread that someone notable has died. Edgar Wright was the first one I saw mention the death of Michael Cimino this afternoon, quoting a Tweet by Cannes luminary Thierry Fremaux, who announced, “Michael Cimino died peacefully, surrounded by his family and these two women who loved him. We loved him also.” Without question, Cimino’s career was defined by one remarkable high and one remarkable low, and to some degree, his career is the perfect illustration of what happened as film culture moved from the ‘70s to the ‘80s, and part of what makes him such a fascinating figure is how questionable every “fact” about him was. Cimino was a mystery in many ways, and when he made his debut as a director with Thunderbolt & Lightfoot, he looked like
See full article at Hitfix »

2016 TCM Film Festival – Field Of Dreams And One Flew Over The Cuckoo’S Nest

This past weekend, Hollywood celebrated the 7th annual Turner Classic Movie Film Festival, and this year’s slate of films did not disappoint.

Shown over 4 days and in multiple theaters along Hollywood Boulevard, the festival continues to draw bigger and bigger crowds each year.

This year’s festival treated classic film fans to over 70 movies and special guests, including Angela Lansbury, Faye Dunaway, Rita Moreno, Francis Ford Coppola, and Carl Reiner – just to name a few.

With so many films showing, its hard to choose what to see, but Wamg attended a few of the classics, along with some special presentations.

Field Of Dreams (1989)

The story goes that while Kevin Costner was filming Bull Durham (1988) he came across the script for Field of Dreams. Producers weren’t holding out for him because they assumed he wouldn’t want to do 2 “baseball movies” in a row. And thank god they were wrong.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates

Take a look at the roots of American campaign image consciousness, and the then-new techniques of cinéma vérité to bring a new 'reality' for film documentaries. Four groundbreaking films cover the Kennedy-Humphrey presidential primary, and put us in the Oval Office for a showdown against Alabama governor George Wallace. The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates Blu-ray Primary, Adventures on the New Frontier, Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment, Faces of November The Criterion Collection 808 1960 -1964 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 53, 52, 53, 12 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Robert Drew, Hubert H. Humphrey, McGeorge Bundy, John Kenneth Galbraith, Richard Goodwin, Albert Gore Sr., Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Pierre Salinger, Haile Selassie, John Steinbeck, George Wallace, Vivian Malone, Burke Marshall, Nicholas Katzenbach, John Dore, Jack Greenberg; Lyndon Johnson, John Kennedy Jr., Caroline Kennedy, Peter Lawford. Cinematography Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, D.A. Pennebaker,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Criterion announces its May Blu-ray line-up

Criterion has announced six new Blu-ray releases as part of its May line-up of the digitally remastered Criterion Collection. Two of the most notable releases are Charlie Chaplin’s Limelight and Bette Midler-starrer The Rose, which are scheduled for release on May 19th.

The full line-up, with technical specifications and artworks, are listed below:

The Rose

Bette Midler exploded onto the screen with her take-no-prisoners performance in this quintessential film about fame and addiction from director Mark Rydell. Midler is the rock-and-roll singer Mary Rose Foster (known as the Rose to her legions of fans), whose romantic relationships and mental health are continuously imperiled by the demands of life on the road. Incisively scripted by Bo Goldman and beautifully shot by Vilmos Zsigmond (with assistance on the dazzling concert scenes by a host of other world-class cinematographers, including Conrad L. Hall, László Kovács, Owen Roizman, and Haskell Wexler), this
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Looking back at Dick Tracy

Becky looks back at an almost-forgotten comic book adaptation from a time before they were cool: Warren Beatty's Dick Tracy.

Feature

Chester Gould’s famous yellow-coated detective, Dick Tracy, has appeared across various mediums since his first comic strip appearance in 1931, but it wasn’t until 1990 that the character made his way into blockbuster territory. It may have been considered less than successful on release and forgotten to a certain extent since then, but there is a lot to love about Warren Beatty’s film, imbued with an infectious sense of fun and comic strip visuals that continue to impress.

Dick Tracy went through several hands before it finally landed Beatty in the director’s chair, though the actor had had a concept for it as far back as 1975. It’s a long and rocky development history that saw names such as Steven Spielberg and John Landis offered the
See full article at Den of Geek »

L.A. Critics Have Their First Best Picture Tie Since First Awards Year

James Franco tattoos and gold teeth: Los Angeles Film Critics 2013 Awards’ surprise winners (photo: James Franco in ‘Spring Breakers’) The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (Lafca), which has been around since the mid-’70s, announced earlier today, December 8, 2013, their list of winners and runners-up. As usual, there were a number of surprises, including James Franco, tying in the Best Supporting Actor category, and Shane Carruth’s sci-fi indie drama Upstream Color, selected as the runner-up for Best Editing. (Check out the full list of 2013 Los Angeles Film Critics winners. See also: Boston Society of Film Critics 2013 winners, announced earlier today.) But really, the biggest surprise of the day was the fact that the Los Angeles Film Critics came up with no less than three ties, including Best Picture: Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity and Spike Jonze’s Her. That’s the Lafca’s first Best Picture tie since its first awards year,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Top 10 movie adaptations

Books and films have been joined at the hip ever since the earliest days of cinema, and adaptations of novels have regularly provided audiences with the classier end of the film spectrum. Here, the Guardian and Observer's critics pick the 10 best

• Top 10 family movies

• Top 10 war movies

• Top 10 teen movies

• Top 10 superhero movies

• Top 10 westerns

• Top 10 documentaries

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Planet of the Apes

Although the source novel, La Planète des Singes, was written by Frenchman Pierre Boule and originally reached its futureshock climax in Paris, this enduring sci-fi fantasy is profoundly American, putting Charlton Heston's steel-jawed patriotism to incredible use. It also holds up surprisingly well as a jarring allegory for the population's fears over escalating cold war tensions.

Beginning with a spaceship crash-landing on an unknown planet after years of cryogenic sleep, Franklin J Schaffner's film soon gets into gear as Heston's upstanding
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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