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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 34 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The directors who can take cinema forward over the next decade

30 July 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe on the directors who can take cinema forward over the next decade…

There’s a cinematic crossroads on the horizon. As the market gets swallowed up by a core consumer taste leaning toward spandex and radioactive arachnid bites, there’s a need for modern thinking, engaging directors to offer something different. After all, there’s only so long the Marvel cow can be milked. It will dry out. It’s the way of things. Studios now bank on billion dollar returns. These seem safe bets now, but for how long? Ultimately it will become a huge gamble.

We’re still seeing interesting film-makers doing their best to re-invigorate or subvert genres. Edgar Wright just smashed it out of the park with Baby Driver. There was a degree of hyperbole about marking him as a cinematic master (until he improves his depiction of women in films, that may allude »

- Amie Cranswick

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Link Wood

20 July 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

THR Felicity Jones replaces Portman in a Ruth Bader Ginsburg biopic

Vox How Tom Holland's dance training makes him a fresh Spider-Man

La Times talks to 18 funny black actresses about their comic careers

Vulture Revenge of the Twink as slimmer male stars finally start getting action roles -- a nice switch over from the steroid set. For now at least

Pajiba five reasons why HBO's proposed Confederate series, from the guys behind Game of Thrones, is a terrible, disappointing, irresponsible idea

Vulture Bilge Elbiri ranks all of Christopher Nolan's movies. The new one, Dunkirk, is #1

IndieWire David Ehrlich ranks all of Luc Besson's movies so you don't have to. The new one, Valerian, is #6

My New Plaid Pants honors the current social media exhibitionistic streak of Zachary Quinto and his boyfriend

Playlist Jonathan Glazer (Birth, Under the Skin) working on his next film already. Yaaas!

Den of »

- NATHANIEL R

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‘Under The Skin’ Visionary Jonathan Glazer Has Finished Writing His Next Movie

20 July 2017 9:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

English director Jonathan Glazer has been a feature filmmaker since 2000, but he’s only made three movies in 17 years: Breakout debut “Sexy Beast,” the criminally overlooked Nicole Kidman psychodrama “Birth” and the modern classic “Under The Skin.” 9 years separated the releases of his last two movies, so many of us have been worried that it would be another decade until Glazer delivered a follow-up to 2014’s “Under The Skin,” but it appears we won’t have to wait that long after all.

Read More: Why Jonathan Glazer’s ‘Under the Skin’ Took a Decade to Make

Speaking to the Nottingham Post (via The Playlist) after picking up his honorary doctorate from Nottingham Trent, Glazer revealed he is starting pre-production on his new movie after working on the script for the past year. The screenplay is finished and will mark his first solo outing as a writer. Glazer co-wrote “Under The Skin »

- Zack Sharf

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Jonathan Glazer Starts Pre-Production On His Next Film

20 July 2017 8:53 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

I’m not saying that Twitter grants me wishes, but it was not that long along that I sent a missive out into the digital universe, wishing for a new movie from Jonathan Glazer.

Dear Jonathan Glazer, please make another movie soon.

— Kevin Jagernauth (@jag24fps) June 28, 2017

Now, I’m not saying I believe in a higher power, but someone was clearly listening…..or I just stumbled upon some fortuitous timing.

Continue reading Jonathan Glazer Starts Pre-Production On His Next Film at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘Invasion of the Body Snatchers’ Scaring Up (Another) Remake at Warner Bros.

19 July 2017 2:52 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Just in time for the ten-year anniversary of its last remake, Warner Bros. is reportedly scaring up yet another take on the 1956 horror classic “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.” Deadline reports that John Davis will produce the new version for the studio, with David Leslie Johnson (best known for “The Conjuring 2” and “Orphan,” and recently tapped for both “Dungeons & Dragons” and the “A Nightmare on Elm Street” remake) on board to write the script.

Based on the 1954 novel “The Body Snatchers” from Jack Finney, “Invasion” has been adapted for the big screen repeatedly, first with Don Siegel’s original hit, which was later followed by Philip Kaufman’s lauded 1978 remake (also a hit) and Abel Ferrera’s 1993 “Body Snatchers.”

Read MoreJoe Manganiello Is Hustling His Own ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ Script, Says He’s ‘Talking to All the Right Parties’

In 2007, Oliver Hirschbiegel tried his hand at a new take, starring »

- Kate Erbland

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Slfs Interview – Robert T. Herrera: Writer and Director of Palacios

12 July 2017 5:31 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Palacios screens Sunday, July 16 at 4:45pm at the Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar Blvd, St. Louis) as part of this year’s St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

Ticket information can be found Here

Eugene, an inner-city teen, escapes the city streets and hides away on a Midwest city rooftop during the Fourth of July holiday. He is found by Holly, a widowed alcoholic, who lives in the secluded rooftop dwelling with her Boston terrier. They commit to spending the day together above the city as they wait for a hopeful resolution to Eugene’s situation. As the day passes, a friendship grows even as their personal realities begin to catch up with them.

Robert T. Herrera, writer and director of Palacios, took the time to answer questions about his film for We Are Movie Geeks in advance of it’s screening at the St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

Interview conducted by »

- Tom Stockman

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Movies Aren’t Dying, They’re Just Growing Up: Mark Cousins On How His New Project Made Him Optimistic

20 June 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

So cinema is dying again. The streaming incomes of Amazon and Netflix will overtake theatrical box office in the next few years, we’re told. As they were in the 1950s and 1980s, movies are on their last legs. But just as TV and VHS gave a new life to movies, and brought them to new audiences, maybe with streaming will follow suit. This week, my own documentary “A Story of Children and Film” will premiere on the streaming service FilmStruck, along with my selection of some amazing movies about kids from around the world that very few Americans have previously had the chance to see. So once again, what seems like the latest death knell for cinema is perhaps just another stage in its path to adulthood.

If cinema survives, it will perhaps be for an unexpected reason. We’re so used to fearing the end of film, and »

- Mark Cousins

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The 20 Best British Horror Films of All Time

15 May 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

British horror thrives on a juxtaposition of the proper and the sinister. Blame it on the accents: Americans can’t help but be drawn in by the way our friends across the pond speak, and by the time certain villains reveal their true aims it’s too late to turn back. As you contemplate the implications of Brexit, look back on horror of a different kind.

20.) “Hellraiser” (1987)

Before becoming one of the most bizarre franchises of all time, “Hellraiser” was a relatively modest cult sensation. Written and directed by horror icon Clive Barker, and based off of his novella “The Hellbound Heart,” this bold vision mixed S&M darkness with some of the grossest visuals of ’80s cinema. The series soon became known for Doug Bradley’s iconic portrayal of lead Cenobite Pinhead, but this first chapter is engrossing gross-out tale with genuine emotion.

 

19.) “Shaun of the Dead” (2004)

Edgar Wright »

- Michael Nordine and William Earl

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Scarlett Johansson: Lost In Blockbusters!

13 May 2017 7:55 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tom Jolliffe on Scarlett Johansson

I’m a fan of Scarlett Johansson. As an actress I think she’s interesting. She’s almost always engaging. She has a sultry old fashioned quality. Frankly she’s gorgeous, which whilst that shouldn’t be as important as it is in Hollywood (and it still is) that means she is a leading lady.

For most, the role which bought her to prominence was her breakout leading role in Lost In Translation. An interesting and subtle performance in a beautiful film. She’s been working solidly since her beginnings as a child actress but Lost In Translation launched her into adulthood and right into the Hollywood A-list. A string of diverse roles added to her CV and offered more glimpses into an undoubted talent to transfix an audience. We’re talking here about an actress with four golden globe nominations thus far and someone »

- Amie Cranswick

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The Hatton Garden Job review – a swift and methodical theft of everyone's time

12 April 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Matthew Goode and Phil Daniels do their best as toughened crims in a story of the real-life 2015 heist, but they can’t rescue this geezer opera from trite tedium

The Hatton Garden safe deposit burglary in 2015 was the largest in English history, carried out by ageing veterans. When news of this caper broke, I – along with every other film journalist in the country – speculated about what the inevitable film version would look like and, in a spasm of sentimental optimism, I even invoked Jonathan Glazer’s masterpiece Sexy Beast, also about a safe deposit job.

A Working Title production with Michael Caine and Jim Broadbent is in the works. In the meantime here is another film – and it’s a most-expense-spared production, ropey and depressing, which fails to keep faith with the grey power ethos by inventing a sexy young crim leader for the older crew: Matthew Goode roughens up his vowels for the part. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch

11 April 2017 3:37 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Nicole Kidman, who’s having something of a renaissance moment.

Bottom Line: Nicole Kidman is one of our most fearless actresses. She’s an Oscar perennial who constantly chases challenging material, edginess be damned. Yes, her most recent nomination stemmed from a very mild-mannered role as Dev Patel’s mother in the true-life Australian drama “Lion,” but for Kidman’s career it’s her exceptions that prove the rule.

She broadened her fanbase by producing, with Reese Witherspoon, the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” in which she co-starred as Celeste Wright, an elegant Monterey mom trapped in a sadomasochistic power struggle of spousal abuse with her husband Perry (Alexander Skarsgard). Critics’ raves and audience reaction will likely push Kidman to »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Nicole Kidman Is a Full-Fledged Badass, Even Before ‘Big Little Lies’ — Career Watch

11 April 2017 3:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Nicole Kidman, who’s having something of a renaissance moment.

Bottom Line: Nicole Kidman is one of our most fearless actresses. She’s an Oscar perennial who constantly chases challenging material, edginess be damned. Yes, her most recent nomination stemmed from a very mild-mannered role as Dev Patel’s mother in the true-life Australian drama “Lion,” but for Kidman’s career it’s her exceptions that prove the rule.

She broadened her fanbase by producing, with Reese Witherspoon, the hugely popular and topical HBO drama series “Big Little Lies,” in which she co-starred as Celeste Wright, an elegant Monterey mom trapped in a sadomasochistic power struggle of spousal abuse with her husband Perry (Alexander Skarsgard). Critics’ raves and audience reaction will likely push Kidman to »

- Anne Thompson

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Which Film Won as Nicole Kidman’s Best Performance in the ‘Kidman World Cup’?

9 April 2017 1:23 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

To be a Nicole Kidman fan hasn’t always been easy. The Australian star may consistently turn in strong, challenging work in a diverse range of arthouse and commercial fare, but inconsistent box-office returns and ongoing tabloid scrutiny of her personal life makes for a fair amount of pushback. She may have won an Oscar and starred in a number of critical darlings, but she somehow inspires snarkier commentary — whether about her choice in roles, or her taste in men — than such comparably gifted peers as Cate Blanchett and Julianne Moore. As BuzzFeed’s Anne Helen Petersen wrote in an appreciation earlier this week: “No woman with as much talent as Kidman should be forced to re-argue, over and over again, that she is a force to be taken seriously.”

2017, however, has been a pretty great year for the Kidman faithful. In January, she scored another Oscar nomination — her fourth »

- Guy Lodge

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'Ghost in the Shell' Review: Anime Rehash Upgrades Software, Loses the Soul

31 March 2017 8:22 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Nestled between William Gibson's claim-staking 1984 novel Neuromancer and the Wachowskis' gamechanging The Matrix, Mamoru Oshii's 1995 cops-and-cyborgs tale Ghost in the Shell is almost assuredly better known than widely seen – next to Akira, it's one of the few anime titles that folks who don't know an Astro-Boy from a Dragonball Z can namecheck. Watch it now, and you'll see how Oshii's manga adaptation both grafted earlier influences onto its source material and influenced countless works that came after it. Like its main character, the movie caused ripples even when its presence seemed invisible. »

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Ghost in the Shell review – Scarlett Johansson remake lacks mystery

29 March 2017 1:04 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Johansson does cyberbattle in a westernised reimagining of the Japanese anime classic that proves watchable but doesn’t have the spirit of the original

In all her un-nippled robotic nudity, Scarlett Johansson swoops down from a high building, ready to do cyberbattle with hackers, criminals, terrorists and the concept of human identity itself. Here is the top-dollar adaptation of the Masamune Shirow manga serial and the resulting 1995 anime gem by Mamoru Oshii. It has been standardised and westernised with hardly any actual Japanese characters left in it, and effectively reimagined as a superhero origin myth, with tropes derived from the existing templates laid down by Metropolis, Robocop, Blade Runner and Total Recall. The film incidentally makes some play with rudimentary Hawking-style robot voices. There are some stately cameos from Juliette Binoche and Takeshi Kitano.

It is a spectacular movie, watchable in its way, but one which – quite apart from the »

- Peter Bradshaw

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7 Filmmakers Deeply Influenced by Luis Buñuel

24 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel died in 1983, but his films continue to inspire many filmmakers today, including Woody Allen and David O. Russell. New York’s Metrograph theater is presenting a series of the surrealist filmmaker’s work from March 30 to April 6 entitled “Buñuel in France” that will feature five of his films. Buñuel directed 35 movies between 1929 and 1977.

Read More: Watch: Was Luis Buñuel a Fetishist? A Video Essay

Here are seven filmmakers who have listed a Buñuel film in their top 10 movies of all time.

Woody Allen

Allen’s favorite Buñuel film is 1972’s “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie,” the famous comedy about six middle-class people attempting to have a meal together. Allen wore his inspiration on his shirt sleeve in his 2011 fantasty-comedy “Midnight in Paris,” casting the actor Adrien De Van to play Buñuel in a scene also featuring the surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (Adrien Brody) and visual »

- Graham Winfrey

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Rushes. Orson Welles on Netflix, Malick Speaks, Michael Mann on "Heat" & "Collateral," Classic Takedowns

14 March 2017 1:51 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSJohn Huston, Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich on the set of The Other Side of the WindWe're still holding our breath, but it looks like we may all get to see Orson Welles' beleaguered film project The Other Side of the Wind, to be released in some fashion by Netflix.The Tribeca Film Festival, running April 17 - 30, has announced its full lineup. Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and defacto representative in the United States for the appreciation of older films, has died at the age of 84. With his passing, the number of venerable, welcoming advocates for classic cinema is dropping precariously low.Recommended VIEWINGThe proof is the pudding: Director Terrence Malick actually participated in a public, recorded conversation! He was at SXSW to promote his new film, Austin-set Song to Song, and took place in a discussion with Richard Linklater »

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A Conversation with Dp Toby Oliver on Crafting The Look of ‘Get Out’

14 March 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

How he and director Jordan Peele crafted the look of the allegorical horror hit.

Cinematographer Toby Oliver’s involvement with Jordan Peele’s Get Out was a match made in Blumhouse Productions. Oliver, who had previously worked with Blumhouse Productions on The Darkness, was sent a copy of the script which Peele had spent several years developing, and was immediately impressed. “It was a well worked-through script,” Oliver told me over the phone last week, as we discussed the production of Get Out and the role of a Director of Photography in general. “He put a lot of time into it, he knew what he wanted to say, so that was really appealing.”

Oliver’s name was put forward as a possibility by Blumhouse Productions, and a meeting was arranged.

“We hit it off in our first conversation, and I had a few ideas about how to visually approach the film and those seemed to agree with »

- Ciara Wardlow

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Beyond A24: How Hip New Distributors Are Targeting Millennial Tastemakers With Bold Films

8 March 2017 9:06 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

No one will forget the Best Picture award ceremony at the 2017 Academy Awards, but there’s a detail lost in the shock and recriminations: It was the moment that announced A24 as an industry gamechanger. Five years after the distributor supported unorthodox indies like Harmony Korine’s “Spring Breakers” and Jonathan Glazer’s “Under The Skin,” A24 saw its $1.5 million poetic drama “Moonlight” pull off a surprise best-picture win — one that led to a stunning $2.5 million box-office take in the film’s 20th week of release. 

In less than five years, A24 has galvanized a young cinephile audience that seemed so elusive, some doubted its existence. A24 certainly wasn’t the first to identify this demo; predecessors such as Magnolia, RADiUS, and Oscilloscope saw the same potential, and created some of the marketing tactics that now have become playbook. However, A24 had the advantage of a business strategy, and backing, »

- Eric Kohn

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Toby Oliver Acs || Get Out || Cinematography Series

4 March 2017 10:27 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Get Out, a genre sleeper hit rightfully boasted as having spawned ‘From the mind of Jordan Peele’, has seized online review aggregators & the box office as its own. Making back ($33.4m), already, nearly 6 times its budget ($4.5m) in its debuting weekend, Get Out looks to grow in the comings weeks and has, as of March 3rd massed a $57.8 million gross revenue. Careers have been secured.

Pivotal to the realization of this social thriller: Toby Oliver Acs, a veteran of small feature budgets and cutthroat schedules, applied his technical prowess and distinct eye to Jordan Peele’s idiosyncratic vision. His background in documentary as well as narrative features seems to lend him balance and clarity throughout his cinematographic perspective. Get Out, both in tonality & Oliver’s light and lensing, begins grounded and transitions to something weirder and surreal. The language Oliver developed alongside writer/director Jordan Peele helps accennuate this change. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Aaron Hunt)

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 34 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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