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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

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2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Documentary

25 August 2016 10:33 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

While best documentary conversations start to take shape in January at the Sundance Film Festival, making the transition from rapturous festival play to awards-season contender is a harrowing road. A documentary must be truly extraordinary to make the final Oscar five.

The number of Sundance docs with awards potential is breathtaking: Breaking out of Sundance 2016 were U.S. Grand Jury Prize winner “Weiner” (IFC), an entertaining portrait of a politician brought down by his weakness for sexting, which turned into a summer hit; U.S. Documentary Directing Award winner “Life, Animated” (The Orchard), a moving portrait of an autistic child who grows up with Disney movies; and HBO’s Audience Award winner “Jim: The James Foley Story.”

Scoring great reviews were Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America” (Espn), an exhaustive examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of »

- Anne Thompson

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2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Documentary

25 August 2016 10:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While best documentary conversations start to take shape in January at the Sundance Film Festival, making the transition from rapturous festival play to awards-season contender is a harrowing road. A documentary must be truly extraordinary to make the final Oscar five.

The number of Sundance docs with awards potential is breathtaking: Breaking out of Sundance 2016 were U.S. Grand Jury Prize winner “Weiner” (IFC), an entertaining portrait of a politician brought down by his weakness for sexting, which turned into a summer hit; U.S. Documentary Directing Award winner “Life, Animated” (The Orchard), a moving portrait of an autistic child who grows up with Disney movies; and HBO’s Audience Award winner “Jim: The James Foley Story.”

Scoring great reviews were Ezra Edelman’s five-part movie “O.J.: Made in America” (Espn), an exhaustive examination of O.J. Simpson and race relations in Los Angeles from the ’60s through the Trial of »

- Anne Thompson

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CNN Films Picks Up Documentary ‘9/11’ for 15th Anniversary

22 August 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

CNN Films has acquired the Emmy award-winning documentary “9/11″ in time for the 15th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

French filmmakers Gédéon and Jules Naudet and former New York City firefigher James Hanlon directed the 2002 film, which is being updated with a new introduction from actor and producer Denis Leary. CNN will premiere the anniversary edition of the two-hour film with limited commercial interruption on Sunday, September 11, at 8 p.m. Est and 11 p.m. Est on CNN/U.S. The network will also air the movie on CNN International at 6 a.m., 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. the same day.

“We are honored that our documentary has found a home at CNN,” the Naudets and Hanlon said in a statement. “We hope that the courage and sacrifices of all of New York’s first responders that we witnessed on September 11th will be seen by a worldwide audience as a beacon »

- Graham Winfrey

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CNN Films Picks Up Documentary ‘9/11’ for 15th Anniversary

22 August 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

CNN Films has acquired the Emmy award-winning documentary “9/11″ in time for the 15th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

French filmmakers Gédéon and Jules Naudet and former New York City firefigher James Hanlon directed the 2002 film, which is being updated with a new introduction from actor and producer Denis Leary. CNN will premiere the anniversary edition of the two-hour film with limited commercial interruption on Sunday, September 11, at 8 p.m. Est and 11 p.m. Est on CNN/U.S. The network will also air the movie on CNN International at 6 a.m., 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. the same day.

“We are honored that our documentary has found a home at CNN,” the Naudets and Hanlon said in a statement. “We hope that the courage and sacrifices of all of New York’s first responders that we witnessed on September 11th will be seen by a worldwide audience as a beacon »

- Graham Winfrey

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Film Review: ‘Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA’

12 August 2016 6:05 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As a documentary filmmaker, Robert Greenwald doesn’t have the high media profile of Michael Moore, Errol Morris, or Alex Gibney (or, God help us, Dinesh D’Souza). But ever since 2004, when he made “Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism,” Greenwald has become a vital and dogged investigator whose no-nonsense, just-the-facts-ma’am approach, with its accent on digging up the profit motive, is reflected in the no-frills thrust of his titles: “Iraq for Sale: The War Profiteers,” “Koch Brothers Exposed,” and the eye-opening and influential “Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price,” one of the first exposés to anatomize how the low-cost “benefits” of big-box stores add up to an insidious illusion, since they depress wages.

The title of Greenwald’s new film, “Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA,” promises a movie out of the same hardheaded liberal-activist wheelhouse: a look at how money is the »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Film Review: ‘Jason Bourne’

26 July 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Call it a rebirth: Matt Damon is back as Jason Bourne in the franchise’s tough, “this time it’s personal” fifth installment, titled, simply enough, “Jason Bourne.” To the extent that the entire Bourne series hinges on the notion of an amnesiac action hero — one who remembers how to kill with his bare hands but draws blanks on key details about his past — this explosive reunion between Damon and director Paul Greengrass further reveals key secrets about Bourne’s origins, bringing its lethal protagonist as close as he’s ever likely to get to total recall.

Mostly, the project marks a return to what worked about the franchise — namely, Damon — suggesting the relief of watching Sean Connery step back into Bond’s shoes after producers tried to replace him with a suave male model in “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.” Meanwhile, audiences are expected to forget both “The Bourne Legacy, »

- Peter Debruge

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Arthouse Audit: Woody Allen’s ‘Café Society’ Boosted by Kristen Stewart, But Not ‘Equals’

17 July 2016 10:56 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Mid-summer brings the biggest limited opening of 2016, with a return to form by Woody Allen as new distributor Amazon Studios and partner Lionsgate pushed “Café Society” to numbers unseen since last December. It’s not at Allen’s top level, but a huge leap above his last two films as well as anything else so far this year.

For a totally different market, Dinesh D’Souza doc “Hillary’s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party” had a limited opening in Middle America with strong front-loaded initial numbers. The political doc goes wider this Friday and could see a better eventual total —via an entirely different audience—than Allen’s film.

Hunt for the Wilderpeople” (The Orchard) from New Zealand leads the films in wider release as it continues to build word-of-mouth success. “Captain Fantastic” (Bleecker Street) boasted a decent second weekend expansion and could end up at a »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Review: ‘Doc & Darryl’ Tells a Pair of Somber Biographies the Way ’30 for 30′ Does Best

14 July 2016 5:57 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Despite the involvement of two directors making their “30 for 30” debut, “Doc & Darryl” is a sports story told in the Espn documentary series’ house style. Reliving the ascent, precipitous decline and muted return of Darryl Strawberry and Dwight “Doc” Gooden, directors Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio adhere to the familiar format, letting the intertwined stories of the two men’s tragedy-laden lives speak for themselves.

Strawberry and Gooden were two electrifying rookie talents; the former an outfielder with a special blend of speed and power and the latter a gifted right-handed pitcher and strikeout machine. Apatow and Bonfiglio show how, after entering pro baseball within a season of each other, they quickly became staples of sports page headlines and New York nightlife alike. Despite the growing spectre of substance abuse, the two became cornerstones of the 1986 New York Mets’ improbable championship run (capped off by a World Series victory prominently featured »

- Steve Greene

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Review: ‘Doc & Darryl’ Tells a Pair of Somber Biographies the Way ’30 for 30′ Does Best

14 July 2016 5:57 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Despite the involvement of two directors making their “30 for 30” debut, “Doc & Darryl” is a sports story told in the Espn documentary series’ house style. Reliving the ascent, precipitous decline and muted return of Darryl Strawberry and Dwight “Doc” Gooden, directors Judd Apatow and Michael Bonfiglio adhere to the familiar format, letting the intertwined stories of the two men’s tragedy-laden lives speak for themselves.

Strawberry and Gooden were two electrifying rookie talents; the former an outfielder with a special blend of speed and power and the latter a gifted right-handed pitcher and strikeout machine. Apatow and Bonfiglio show how, after entering pro baseball within a season of each other, they quickly became staples of sports page headlines and New York nightlife alike. Despite the growing spectre of substance abuse, the two became cornerstones of the 1986 New York Mets’ improbable championship run (capped off by a World Series victory prominently featured »

- Steve Greene

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Doc Corner: 'Zero Days' is One of the Year's Best

12 July 2016 8:33 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Glenn here with our weekly look at documentaries from theatres, festivals, and on demand.

Alex Gibney works with such ferocious regularity that it’s sometimes hard to keep track. Last year alone he had three films released following two the year before that. His latest, Zero Days, falls into the camp of Gibney films in which he most excels - those like Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God and Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room that allow him to exercise his skills at investigative journalism and dig deep into exposing organizations and those who surround them. While it lacks the pop fancies that made Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief such a success, Zero Days is Gibney’s best documentary in years.

Told with all the propulsive, thrilling excitement of a Hollywood spy blockbuster, Zero Days lifts the lid on a series of cybercrimes »

- Glenn Dunks

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Italy’s I Wonder scores doc haul including Gibney, Herzog titles

12 July 2016 4:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Italian distributor buys docs including Zero Days and Lo And Behold and a number of narrative dramas.

Italian distributor I Wonder Pictures has struck deals for a number of documentaries, confirming its place as a key player in the doc market.

Andrea Romeo, I Wonder managing director, has picked up a number of films that screened at the recent Italian Biografilm festival, of which he is also the artistic director.

Acquisitions include Alex Gibney’s Zero Days, Werner Herzog’s Lo And Behold and Morgan Neville’s Music Of Strangers about cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble.

Also picked up were the Paula Vaccaro and Jim Jarmusch-produced celebration of Howard Bookner, Uncle Howard; refugee story Those Who Jump; doc thriller The Lovers And The Despot; and Ester Gould’s Strike A Pose, the what-happened-next chronicle about the dancers of Madonna’s 1990 music tour.

I Wonder, which has previously released documentaries Citizenfour, The Look Of Silence and [link »

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Watch Thrilling Exclusive Clip For Alex Gibney’s Documentary Zero Days

11 July 2016 11:50 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

It was one of the most concerning facets to arise from Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing; Stuxnet, a malicious computer worm that was allegedly hatched as a joint American-Israeli cyber weapon. Designed to cripple Iran’s nuclear program, the virus purportedly exploits the zero-day loop in computer software, all the while hiding any malicious files and processes that were carried out during said digital infiltration.

Hoping to shed light on that elusive Stuxnet is filmmaker Alex Gibney, who just recently launched Zero Days across theatres and on demand services. Available to view from Friday, July 8, We Got This Covered has an exclusive and thrilling clip to share, and you can find it in the player above.

Among those quizzed about the alleged cyber weapon are Colonel Gary D. Brown, Eric Chien, Richard A. Clarke, General Michael Hayden, Olli Heinonen, Chris Inglis, Vitaly Kamluk and Eugene Kaspersky.

Zero Days is now available »

- Michael Briers

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PopPolitics: Alex Gibney on ‘Zero Days’ and the Need for Rules of Cyber Warfare (Listen)

10 July 2016 1:55 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Alex Gibney’s latest documentary “Zero Days” focuses on the covert operation by U.S. and Israeli intelligence officials to unleash a malware attack on an Iranian nuclear facility in late 2009 and 2010, destroying up to 1,000 centrifuges.

The cyberattack also had unintended consequences. The malware, known as Stuxnet, spread around the world, and was eventually discovered by computer engineers, but it has never been officially acknowledged by the U.S. or Israeli governments.

Zero Days” plays like a thriller, but it also raises questions of this new type of warfare. The Stuxnet attack proved that malware can be used not just to destroy computer systems but also to cause physical damage and disasters and threaten human lives.

“I think it is fair to say that the United States may be the most vulnerable country in the world to cyber attacks on critical infrastructure,” Gibney tells Variety‘s “PopPolitics” on SiriusXM. “We are so deeply interconnected. »

- Ted Johnson

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Arthouse Audit: Viggo Mortensen Propels ‘Captain Fantastic’ to Rare Heights

10 July 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Thanks to a well-reviewed movie star, Bleecker Street took “Captain Fantastic” to a now-rare, once-common $20,000-plus limited per theater opening. With all well-oiled cylinders at work, Bleecker  filled the demand for older-audience films after two failed recent attempts by others at corralling the younger market (“Swiss Army Man” and “The Neon Demon”).

Two New York-only docs, “Under the Sun” (Icarus) and Sundance opener “Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You” (Music Box) both attracted interest.

A wider Bollywood release, Salman Khan-starrer “Sultan” (Yash Raj), achieved something few specialized films have managed in recent months: a Top Ten placement despite playing at fewer than 300 theaters.

Meantime, The Orchard’s “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” expanded again to strong numbers close to last weekend’s. This word-of-mouth hit could play all summer and expand wider. There is still an audience out there: it’s just more selective.

Opening

Captain Fantastic” (Bleecker Street) – Metacritic: 70; Festivals include: Sundance, »

- Tom Brueggemann

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‘Zero Days’ Review: Alex Gibney Hacks Into the Legendary Stuxnet Virus

8 July 2016 1:52 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

How do you make a documentary about something people won’t talk about? It’s been widely reported that the Stuxnet virus, which infected computers all over the world in 2010, was a joint creation of U.S. and Israeli intelligence designed to cripple Iran’s nuclear capacity. But the long and impressive line of high-ranking intelligence agency members that Alex Gibney (“Going Clear,” “Taxi to the Dark Side”) assembles for “Zero Days” is almost comically tight-lipped about Stuxnet, all the way down to refusing to confirm it even exists. The subject is, as former CIA and Nsa chief Michael Hayden admits, »

- Sam Adams

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Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (July 8, 2016)

8 July 2016 12:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

To help sift through the increasing number of new releases (independent or otherwise), the Weekly Film Guide is here! Below you’ll find basic plot, personnel and cinema information for all of this week’s fresh offerings.

Starting this month, we’ve also put together a list for the entire month. We’ve included this week’s list below, complete with information on screening locations for films in limited release.

See More: Here Are All the Upcoming Movies in Theaters for July 2016

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, July 8. All synopses provided by distributor unless listed otherwise.

Wide 

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates

Director: Jake Szymanski

Cast: Adam DeVine, Anna Kendrick, Aubrey Plaza, Zac Efron

Synopsis: Two brothers place an online ad to find dates for a wedding and the ad goes viral.

The Secret Life of Pets

Director: Chris Renaud, »

- Steve Greene

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Alex Gibney on Stuxnet film Zero Days: 'We need laws for cyberweapons'

8 July 2016 8:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

His latest documentary lays bare the story of the Stuxnet worm, a groundbreaking virus jointly created by the Us and Israel. Here the acclaimed film-maker discusses the pervasive threat posed by this new age of warfare

“How paranoid were you before you made this movie and how paranoid are you now?” That question was perhaps the only moment of levity during a conversation with documentarian Alex Gibney after the credits rolled on Zero Days, a terrifying account of the cyberwar that is already raging on thumb drives and mainframes from Washington to Tel Aviv to Isfahan Province in Iran and anywhere else that can connect to the internet.

Related: Zero Days review – a disturbing portrait of malware as the future of war

Continue reading »

- Jordan Hoffman

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New to Streaming: ‘Louder Than Bombs,’ ‘Neon Bull,’ ‘By the Sea,’ ‘Zero Days,’ and More

8 July 2016 8:13 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

A War (Tobias Lindholm)

In only his second outing as sole director after 2012’s acclaimed A Hijacking, Tobias Lindholm is commanding unusual levels of respect and anticipation with A War – undoubtedly earned with the establishing of a very personal brand of filmmaking, rooted in observation, deliberate pacing and a terse directing style. Viewers familiar with his previous film, a hostage drama detailing the hijacking of a »

- The Film Stage

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Alex Gibney’s ‘Zero Days’ Will Make You Paranoid [Review]

7 July 2016 3:17 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Get ready to get very, very paranoid. Just in case you’d begun to regard your laptop or the mobile device on which you’re reading these words as a benign contraption whose primary covert function is the ability to snap quickly to a spreadsheet when the boss walks by, here comes Alex Gibney, on prime Gibney form, […]

The post Alex Gibney’s ‘Zero Days’ Will Make You Paranoid [Review] appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Jessica Kiang

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The Oscar race for best documentary is on – here are the early contenders

7 July 2016 11:20 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From Sundance hits like Life, Animated and Weiner, to Alex Gibney’s latest and Oj Simpson: Made in America, here are the films making waves this year

The race to the Academy Awards is largely believed to kick off every autumn, when film studios typically unveil their slate of serious contenders. But for the feature documentary competition, the gallop often begins as early as January, before the previous awards season has even wrapped.

Related: Weiner – how a film about a political sex scandal suddenly got more intimate

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

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