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Lynda Day George Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trivia (10) | Personal Quotes (11)

Overview (3)

Date of Birth 11 December 1944San Marcos, Texas, USA
Birth NameLynda Louise Day
Height 5' 9" (1.75 m)

Mini Bio (1)

An American television actress, Lynda Day George first drew attention when she appeared in the popular TV series Mission: Impossible (1966) as Lisa Casey, a role for which she received a Golden Globe nomination. She also did numerous guest-star roles in such series as The Love Boat (1977) and Charlie's Angels (1976).

While appearing in the feature The Gentle Rain (1966), she met Christopher George, the handsome lead actor of the popular war series The Rat Patrol (1966); they fell in love about three years later, when they were reunited in the John Wayne western Chisum (1970), and they were married after its release. During the 1970s, Lynda appeared in numerous films with her husband. In 1983, she and Chris co-starred in the horror film Mortuary (1983). Sadly, after its completion Christopher George died of a heart attack, at age 54.

Lynda was devastated and felt that she couldn't act without him. She appeared in another film shortly after his death, called Young Warriors (1983), but after appearing in as a guest star a few TV series, Lynda gave up acting. Today, she is remarried and lives in Beverly Hills.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Anonymous

Spouse (3)

Doug Cronin (17 March 1990 - 4 December 2010) (his death)
Christopher George (15 May 1970 - 28 November 1983) (his death) (1 child)
Joseph Pantano (1963 - 1970) (divorced) (1 son)

Trivia (10)

Two children; one girl, one boy.
She and Christopher George filed suit to have her son, from her previous marriage, declared George's natural son.
Was an early activist against ozone-layer depletion.
Lost a 26-year-old brother to cancer during the 1970s.
Her acting mentor was the late Peter Graves.
Missed 9 episodes of the last season of Mission: Impossible (1966), because she was on maternity leave.
Lives on Discovery Bay in Gardiner, Washington for part of the year. [March 2010]
Retired from acting. [May 2002]
Now lives in Toluca Lake, California

Personal Quotes (11)

I am the common man. I am the common man. And the common man is me. When you start thinking you're great, when you start thinking you're bigger and better than anybody else, that's when your integrity falls by the wayside. I find that offensive. I find it repulsive when people think they're bigger and better than the truth.
Somehow or other in this country of ours, we need to, just as citizens, we need to be able to divorce ourselves from our political affiliation, and our need to follow the party line, because therein is the destruction of our individuality. When we are so immersed in that system, that we're unable to make rational decisions or to look at a situation that is ultimately and obviously a beneficial situation, and not be able to agree with it simply because it is proposed by a person of a different party... that's beyond belief for me. It's just completely outside any kind of rational thinking as far as I'm concerned. It doesn't make sense. Unfortunately, I don't believe that we're smart enough to be able to operate in a situation like that.
I never kidded myself about what I did as an actress. I never pretended that what I was doing was some great art form. When you start thinking you're great, that's when your integrity goes by the wayside. That's when you lose touch with the common folk. Well, when you lose touch with the common folk, when you start thinking that you're bigger and better than them, that's when you lose touch with reality. I could never think that way. As far as I'm concerned, I am the common folk. I am the common man, and the common man is me.
Having a Broadway credit is nice, but when you get right down to it, it's just another play. It's just a play. It's just entertainment. In the big picture, is this play, is any play, is any movie or TV show, really all that important?
Television ratings? I think they're kind of pointless. Are we talking about something we can have with meals, or are we talking about something... what is this? I'm not sure I understand that at all. Seems like a wasted gesture unless they're planning on putting on a lot of nudity. Which is probably what they're planning. I mean, God, let's show some more boobs. Geez! Just what we need. I mean it's incredible. It's really amazing. So, I don't think very much of TV ratings. I haven't had any cause to so far. I don't know if they actually mean anything to anyone.
The 1930s, '40s, and '50s was when they made real motion-pictures [sic]. I don't have one film in my personal collection made after the 1960s. The reason for that is since the 1960s, most of the films we've been making aren't motion-pictures [sic]. That's primarily because we're so interested in invading the privacy of our characters.
I always thought of Mission: Impossible (1966) as a very Republican show. Well, I was more than okay with that, because that's pretty much where I was politically. I don't think that's where Lesley Ann Warren was though. I love Lesley. She's a terrific actress, but she was really out of place on that show. I mean, Lesley Ann Warren's being on "Mission: Impossible" was like a Democrat being at a Republican convention.
Show the movie to seven people in the room, and you'll get seven different opinions. Who knows why, and who cares.
Age is the great leveler.
If the ozone layer goes, so do crops, fish, healthy people and animals.
Man must not tamper with the environment.

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