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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2010

4 items from 2017


L.A. Riots 25th Anniversary Documentaries, Ranked: Which Ones Best Explain the Unrest Now

22 April 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There’s no question that Rodney King was brutally beaten by Los Angeles Police Department officers – video taken of the savage act proves it. Yet the four men seen clubbing King were acquitted by a Simi Valley jury in 1992, lighting a match for one of the deadliest and costliest civil unrests in U.S. history.

Read More: How Spike Lee, John Singleton and John Ridley Left Their Marks on the 25th Anniversary of the Los Angeles Riots

It’s 25 years later, and Los Angeles – and the Lapd – have changed. But has the rest of the country? Regular reports of police brutality, now well-documented in an age of phone cameras, makes it clear that we haven’t come all that far. Several new documentaries explore the L.A. riots, including the underlying reasons, the actual events, what happened next, and how it relates to today. Among the filmmakers putting their own »

- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen, Liz Shannon Miller, Michael Schneider and Steve Greene

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L.A. Riots 25th Anniversary Documentaries, Ranked: Which Ones Best Explain the Unrest Now

22 April 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

There’s no question that Rodney King was brutally beaten by Los Angeles Police Department officers – video taken of the savage act proves it. Yet the four men seen clubbing King were acquitted by a Simi Valley jury in 1992, lighting a match for one of the deadliest and costliest civil unrests in U.S. history.

Read More: How Spike Lee, John Singleton and John Ridley Left Their Marks on the 25th Anniversary of the Los Angeles Riots

It’s 25 years later, and Los Angeles – and the Lapd – have changed. But has the rest of the country? Regular reports of police brutality, now well-documented in an age of phone cameras, makes it clear that we haven’t come all that far. Several new documentaries explore the L.A. riots, including the underlying reasons, the actual events, what happened next, and how it relates to today. Among the filmmakers putting their own »

- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen, Liz Shannon Miller, Michael Schneider and Steve Greene

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John Ridley on 'Guerrilla,' Black Activism, Resisting Trump

14 April 2017 8:27 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Through a combinationof crazy prolificacy and an accident of timing, John Ridley's name is behind somany hours of television this month that he could program an entire network forthe better part of a day. As it stands, three different Ridley projects willoverlap by the end of April, each a testament to his interest in social justiceand upheaval, from contemporary labor and immigration problems in NorthCarolina to racial upheaval and violence in the early 1970s England and early 1990sLos Angeles. Though Ridley has been working steadily on TV and film for twodecades, »

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Sundance Film Review: ‘The Force’

1 February 2017 1:09 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

If the Fred Wiseman of the ’60s made a film about cops in the age of body-cams and Black Lives Matter — a verité documentary called “Police,” to place alongside his classic lean and clear-eyed institutional studies “High School” and “Titicut Follies” — it might look something like “The Force.” An even-handed, no-easy-answers exposé that won this year’s Sundance documentary prize for Best Director (the filmmaker is Peter Nicks), the movie chronicles two tumultuous years in the life of the Oakland Police Department. It starts in 2014, the year after a new chief has come in — the fifth one in a decade. Why the rolling heads? Because the Oakland police, after clash upon clash with the local community, were being held up as a paragon of law enforcement in need of reform.

In 2002, the department was placed under federal oversight, yet none of the changes implemented seemed to work. Then Chief Sean Whent came in. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2010

4 items from 2017


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