Liz Garbus - News Poster

News

Breaking Down the Pros and Cons of Oscar Campaigns for Documentary Filmmakers

Breaking Down the Pros and Cons of Oscar Campaigns for Documentary Filmmakers
In may, ABC News’ Lincoln Square Prods. decided against submitting John Ridley’s “Let It Fall: 1982-1992” for Primetime Emmy consideration. The reason? The television company hoped that the 140-minute docu, which tackles the 1992 Los Angeles riots, would receive feature film recognition via the Academy Awards. Oscar consultants concluded that a pre-existing Emmy profile could potentially hurt the doc’s chances at a little gold man.

ABC’s decision to forgo a possible Primetime Emmy in favor of Oscar glory wasn’t exactly surprising.

Oscar is the entertainment industry’s most esteemed accolade, and AMPAS recognition represents a coveted chance for not only the highest form of industry peer recognition, but also mainstream audience attention — a feat rarely achieved in the nonfiction film world.

“The feature doc business has never been so vibrant and, in part, that’s because there is the perception of the possibility of real Academy Award glory down the road in the life
See full article at Variety - Film News »

7 Great Documentaries About Remarkable Women, From ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’ to ‘The Beaches of Agnes’

7 Great Documentaries About Remarkable Women, From ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’ to ‘The Beaches of Agnes’
Two of the world’s most influential women — pioneering primatologist Jane Goodall and lauded writer Joan Didion — are both on the receiving end of insightful new documentaries this year, both of which are hitting screens in the coming weeks. Brett Morgen’s “Jane” (which opened just last week to deservedly rave reviews) tracks the early years of Goodall’s work in Tanzania’s Gombe Stream National Park, combining both new interviews with the still-trailblazing scientist and early footage lensed by her former husband Hugo van Lawick (a celebrated animal photographer) to tell a full-bodied story about Goddall’s amazing ethic and her tremendous empathy for the animals she’s made the center of her life.

This week, Griffin Dunne’s look at Didion’s life, “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” will arrive on Netflix, following her own early years and her current state as a literary icon. Both
See full article at Indiewire »

Sexism and the music doc: 'Grace Jones has had her 15 minutes'

Why Bloodlight and Bami bucks the cliched trend that’s haunted films about Whitney Houston and Amy Winehouse

Related: Grace Jones and giant confetti cannons: the 20 biggest festival moments of 2017

The tragic downfall of a celebrity ingenue: a trusted, market-friendly formula for the big screen, especially where female recording artists are concerned. Documentaries about female stars tend to tread a similar narrative, involving a reductive look at personal histories, where the film-maker is less interested in the idea of accomplished musicians than of girls who supposedly dreamed too big and self-destructed through addiction and failed relationships. With this mythologising, you might say that Amy Winehouse (Asif Kapadia’s Amy), Whitney Houston (Nick Broomfield’s Whitney: Can I Be Me), Nina Simone ( Liz Garbus and Hal Tulchin’s What Happened Miss Simone?) and Janis Joplin (Amy Berg’s Janis: Little Girl Blue) have been made more alike in death than in life.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film News Roundup: Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions Backs Oliver Sacks Documentary

Film News Roundup: Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions Backs Oliver Sacks Documentary
In today’s film news roundup, Paul Allen comes on board an Oliver Sacks documentary, the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival unveils its lineup, and animation veteran Teresa Cheng gets a USC post.

Documentary Backing

Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Productions is backing the documentary “Oliver Sacks: His Own Life” in partnership with Steeplechase Films, American Masters Pictures, Motto Pictures, Passion Pictures, and Tangled Bank Studios.

Directed by filmmaker Ric Burns (“New York,” “Andy Warhol”), the film attempts to provide an exploration of human consciousness and the intimate relationship between art and science. Burns shot footage in the months before Sacks died in 2015, including more than 80 hours with the physician himself, his partner, and his closest family, friends, and colleagues.

Allen and Carole Tomko, general manager of Vulcan Productions, are executive producers of “Oliver Sacks: His Own Life,” along with Julie Goldman of Motto Pictures and Michael Kantor of American Masters Pictures. Vulcan said Friday
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Amber Tamblyn Responds to Alleged Creep James Woods: ‘Only You and Your Darkness Know Who You Are’

Amber Tamblyn Responds to Alleged Creep James Woods: ‘Only You and Your Darkness Know Who You Are’
Amber Tamblyn would like James Woods to examine his darkness. The outspoken feminist, actress, and writer/director penned an impassioned open letter to the two-time Oscar nominee (and Twitter’s resident crazy old man), and it’s required reading for anyone who cares about sexism in Hollywood.

The letter is a response to a heated Twitter exchange in which Tamblyn, 34, recalled when the now 70-year-old actor “tried to pick [her up]” with a friend in a parking lot when she was 16. Tamblyn’s tweet came following Woods’ pointed criticism of the age difference in “Call Me By Your Name,” to which that film’s star, Armie Hammer, had responded: “Didn’t you date a 19 year old when you were 60…….?”

Read More:‘Call Me By Your Name’ Star Armie Hammer Roasts James Woods on Twitter: ‘Didn’t You Date a 19 Year Old When You Were 60?’

James Woods tried to pick me and my
See full article at Indiewire »

Film News Roundup: Graham King Signs First-Look Deal With Paramount

Film News Roundup: Graham King Signs First-Look Deal With Paramount
In today’s film news roundup, Graham King signs a first-look deal at Paramount and Samuel Goldwyn picks up horror film “Psychopaths.”

First-look Deal

Graham King, who won the best picture Oscar for 2006’s “The Departed,” has signed a three-year first-look deal with Paramount Pictures.

Related

TV News Roundup: Liz Garbus Shooting New York Times-Donald Trump Documentary for Showtime

Under the non-exclusive deal, King will develop and produce films through his Gk Films shingle. The company will relocate offices to the Paramount lot as part of the new deal. He previously produced “Rango,” “World War Z,” and “Hugo” for Paramount.

Paramount chairman/CEO Jim Gianopulos said, “Graham not only has keen artistic and commercial tastes, but he also is one of the most prolific producers in this industry. It’s my pleasure to welcome him to our Paramount family and we all look forward to many successful collaborations for years to come.”

King
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Liz Garbus Directing Doc Series About New York Times in the Trump Era

Liz Garbus: The Hollywood Reporter/YouTube

Liz Garbus’ next project will give viewers an inside-look at The New York Times. Per The Hollywood Reporter, the “What Happened, Miss Simone?” director is helming a documentary series for Showtime that follows the newspaper and its coverage of the Trump administration — which is not exactly a fan of the free press, especially the NY Times. Garbus has been filming at the Times’ main office for over six months already.

The project, tentatively-titled “The Fourth Estate,” will serve as “both an inside look at how the paper is covering President Trump and the larger role of journalism today — as truths are challenged at every turn and the label of ‘fake news’ is used by the current administration as a response to negative coverage,” THR details.

As for the demagogue himself, Trump has called the publication “the failing New York Times” and “highly inaccurate,” which seems to have only strengthened the Times’ reputation. “In May, The New York Times Company reported rising digital subscriptions (308,000 added in the first quarter),” the source observes, “even as overall advertising revenue dropped seven percent.”

Garbus received Best Documentary Oscar nominations for “What Happened, Miss Simone?” and “The Farm: Angola, USA” in 2016 and 1999, respectively. Netflix doc “What Happened, Miss Simone?” took home the Emmy for Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Special in 2016. “Nothing Left Unsaid: Gloria Vanderbilt & Anderson Cooper,” “Love, Marilyn,” and “Bobby Fischer Against the World” are among Garbus’ other doc directing credits.

Next, Garbus will direct the Sarah Paulson-starrer “Lost Girls.” The adaptation of Robert Kolker’s 2013 book “Lost Girls: An Unsolved American Mystery” is about the so-called Craigslist Ripper.

Showtime has previously acquired the rights to documentaries like Laura Poitras’ “Risk,” Elyse Steinberg and Josh Kriegman’s “Weiner,” and the Whitney Houston-centric “Whitney: Can I Be Me.”

Liz Garbus Directing Doc Series About New York Times in the Trump Era was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

TV News Roundup: Liz Garbus Shooting New York Times-Donald Trump Documentary for Showtime

TV News Roundup: Liz Garbus Shooting New York Times-Donald Trump Documentary for Showtime
In today’s roundup, Liz Garbus is developing a New York Times documentary for Showtime, while Kirk Acevedo has been cast in the upcoming season of “Arrow.”

Development

Liz Garbus is shooting a documentary series about the New York Times’ aggressive coverage of the Trump administration for the Showtime premium cable network. The Oscar-nominated filmmaker has been filming inside the newspaper’s newsroom for the past six months to gather footage for the series. Showtime declined to comment, but the show is intended to look at both how the newspaper is covering Trump and the larger role of the fourth estate. The film marks Garbus’s first collaboration with Showtime; she’s utilized several other distribution partners in the past. “What Happened, Miss Simone?,” which earned Garbus an Academy Award nomination in 2016, was Netflix’s first prestige documentary, and Garbus followed it with the doc “Nothing Left Unsaid: Gloria Vanderbilt & Anderson Cooper” for HBO. The
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Showtime Sets Documentary at New York Times About Trump Coverage

  • The Wrap
Showtime Sets Documentary at New York Times About Trump Coverage
Director Liz Garbus is filming a Showtime documentary at the New York Times offices that centers on the publication’s Donald Trump coverage, according to CNN. The tentative title is “The Fourth Estate” and will focus on reporters working on scoops about the current administration. Garbus has been filming in the offices since the inauguration in January and is also shadowing individual reporters in Washington, D.C. and New York as they cover Trump, who has previously criticized the Times as “failing.” The documentary will center not only on the paper’s political reportage but also its efforts to remain viable in the digital age.
See full article at The Wrap »

Showtime, Liz Garbus Filming Trump-Focused Doc Series at N.Y. Times

Showtime, Liz Garbus Filming Trump-Focused Doc Series at N.Y. Times
Their reporting will be televised. As The New York Times continues to be a leading source for coverage of President Donald Trump and his controversial, conflict-filled administration, filmmaker Liz Garbus is taking her cameras inside the iconic paper's newsroom during these rather unprecedented days for a new Showtime series.

The Hollywood Reporter has learned from multiple sources that the documentarian has been filming at the newspaper's headquarters for more than six months for a multipart series at the pay cable network. Showtime declined to comment, but sources tell THR that the project is intended to be both an inside look...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Showtime, Liz Garbus Filming Trump-Focused Doc Series at N.Y. Times

Their reporting will be televised. As The New York Times continues to be a leading source for coverage of President Donald Trump and his controversial, conflict-filled administration, filmmaker Liz Garbus is taking her cameras inside the iconic paper's newsroom during these rather unprecedented days for a new Showtime series.

The Hollywood Reporter has learned from multiple sources that the documentarian has been filming at the newspaper's headquarters for more than six months for a multipart series at the pay cable network. Showtime declined to comment, but sources tell THR that the project is intended to be both an inside look...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Valerie Red-Horse Mohl — “Mankiller”

Wilma Mankiller swearing into office as Deputy Chief in 1983: Courtesy of the Wilma Mankiller Foundation

Valerie Red-Horse Mohl, a filmmaker of Cherokee ancestry, is the owner/founder of Red-Horse Native Productions, Inc., which has become a preeminent collaborator with American Indian tribal nations to bring important Native stories accurately and respectfully to the screen. She is a member of the Directors Guild, the Screen Actors Guild, and an inductee of the Nawbo (National Association of Women Business Owners) Hall of Fame. Her directorial work includes “Naturally Native,” “True Whispers: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers,” and “Choctaw Code Talkers.”

Mankiller” will premiere at the 2017 La Film Festival on June 19.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Vrhm: This is a documentary about an amazing human being. “Mankiller” is the powerful story of Wilma Mankiller, who found her voice in San Francisco’s civil rights movement and returned to lead the Cherokee Nation as the first woman to be elected Principal Chief.

She achieved more positive changes for the Nation than any other leader before or after. She overcame numerous obstacles including rampant sexism and racism, but she never wavered.

Her life story is so much more than a biography; it is truly an example of grace, poise, dignity, humility, and success despite adversity — the true meaning of servant leadership.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Vrhm: As a Native American woman of Cherokee heritage, I have been a fan of Wilma Mankiller’s for many, many years. I was obviously drawn to the story of a strong female role model — but I was also very humbled and concerned that I might not be able to do Wilma’s story justice. Once I knew that executive producer Gale Anne Hurd would join me, I couldn’t wait to produce and direct this. This was our third collaboration, and we work so well together.

We both knew we couldn’t make this film without the support of Wilma’s family. When they also came on board, we really knew we had an amazing opportunity for collaboration.

I also feel so very blessed to have our tremendous production team come on board; they, too, wanted to create the best film possible for Wilma. Then, as we delved deep into the research and development phase, I realized how much more there was to her story. I drawn to her legacy as a truly positive example that the world needs to see and understand.

This is the bottom line for me: I am initially always drawn to a story by my own personal feelings, but I’m further drawn in if we can get the right team together and really do it right.

Everything converged in a very positive way to tell this story.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Vrhm: We realize how Wilma Mankiller’s leadership, consensus building, community organizing, quiet influence, and servant leadership are all qualities that are extremely timely and topically relevant today. I truly believe we can all learn rich and valuable lessons from her story and legacy. I see this film as so much more than a biography; I believe it actually is a wake-up call for positive social change.

Wilma lived with the philosophy of “Ga-Dugi,” which translates to “in a good way.” I want those leaving the theater to refuse the current divisiveness of our country. I want them to demand that our elected leaders return to servant leadership, civility, effectiveness, and kindness towards humanity as a whole. Better yet, I want some to run for office and get leadership back to the way it should be!

I know audiences will be empowered by her story, but I hope that women especially are moved. She was a pioneer in the women’s movement in Indian Country and never gave up. She persevered against all types of discrimination and persecution, all while she was physically very ill. I think we can all find strength from her story. If she could do it, so can we.

Gale’s immense body of narrative film and television projects typically carry the theme of ordinary people accomplishing extraordinary things. “Mankiller” is the non-fiction embodiment of that concept. We truly want people to feel empowered and emboldened as they leave.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Vrhm: Gale and I always seem drawn to stories that focus on a historical timeframe or subjects who have passed on. This therefore require us to locate historical archival footage and photos. Our prior two documentaries were based on WWII and Wwi, respectively. This war footage was much easier to access than “Mankiller’s” thanks to national archives.

The “meat” of Wilma’s story takes place in the ’60s , ’70s and ’80s. Although these decades were not that long ago, they are light years in the past, technologically speaking. We scoured family, friends’ and co-workers’ materials, as well as the Cherokee Nation, universities, news agencies, and a variety of organizations worldwide. We received materials on VHS and cassette tapes. We shot additional interviews and footage five or six times over four years to try to get everything in the film.

Creatively, we were committed to telling the story from Wilma’s point of view and voice. To capture that, we compiled all available footage of her speaking, as well as home movies and eye-witness testimonies from those who loved and worked with her.

It was a daunting task on our budget — and I’m sure we’ve left something out. But overall, I am so proud of the research team we had and the materials we are able to include.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Vrhm: We received our initial funding from Vision Maker Media, which funds Native American programming for PBS. Their funding didn’t cover the entire cost of production, so Gale and the Valhalla team launched a Kickstarter campaign.

This was my first experience with crowdfunding, and it was pretty amazing. We fulfilled our remaining funding needs from over 1,000 online supporters. I think I had about ten friends donate, and the rest of the donations mostly came from fans of “The Walking Dead,” [which Gale executive produces]. They were incredibly supportive. One news article about our Kickstarter campaign asked, “What do Zombies and a Cherokee Chief have in common?” I am very, very grateful to every single donor that helped us complete this incredibly important film.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at the Laff?

Vrhm: I am in ministry, and my faith is a huge part of my life. I always tell people that God has a plan for us; when one door closes, the right one typically opens. I feel very strongly that the Laff premiere of “Mankiller” is God’s perfect plan for this film.

The support from this film community regarding women’s issues and minority filmmaking is also overwhelming.

I received my film/theater degree from UCLA, so Los Angeles is always home to me. I couldn’t be happier or more grateful.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Vrhm: I’ll start with the worst. Another American Indian filmmaker once disagreed with me about collaboration. This person told me that as American Indian filmmakers, we should metaphorically “stay on the reservation” and only make films with and for our core audience of the tribal community and indigenous people. They felt that if we joined forces with “Hollywood,” we would be selling out and compromising our cultural traditions and values.

I am so glad I didn’t listen to that advice, as the collaborations in my film career are incredibly important and meaningful; they have enabled me to tell more stories about our community with a much broader impact.

I have so much great advice that I will try to limit it to just a few examples:

My husband Curt is a former NFL Offensive Lineman. He explained that the lineman mentality is that you will “win” on every play, and every play is designed to make a touchdown. While playing, he never tells himself that he has limits or can’t do it. When he has a bad play, he simply shakes it off and goes back in to score the next time.

When we first met, he couldn’t understand why I felt limited about certain things in my career. I would often say, “As a Native American woman, Hollywood wouldn’t possibly accept me in that role or position.” He absolutely wouldn’t let me think that way. Over the 40 years together, he has taught me to think like a lineman — no limits!

My mother’s favorite motto, “Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained,” hangs on my office wall. Gale has really embodied and modeled this philosophy throughout our collaborations.

I will never forget filming “Choctaw Code Talkers.” I was told that in order to film in Washington, D.C., we would need an Act of Congress passed — and the event we needed to shoot was about a week away. I hung up and thought, “Well, so much for that!” But Gale and her team at Valhalla simply asked, “So, what do we need to do to pass an Act of Congress?” Amazingly, she was successful.

In my personal life, I have also received the most impactful advice from a Bible Study entitled “Love Focused.” It proposes to live one’s life with two goals at the forefront of everything: to love God and to love others. Simply that. It can be extremely hard to implement, but it is incredible when put to practice.

I think part of what I love about Wilma was how much she did truly love others. Not just friends and nice people — everyone.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Vrhm: I have an incredible husband and three amazing children: Courtney, Derek, and Chelsea. Fortunately, they inherited their dad’s sense of humor and sense of fun. I am more of a Type A workaholic, but they teach me every day; they make me have fun, enjoy life, and relax a little.

I’ve noticed that most of the other female directors I meet are like me: very driven, taking on too much at any given time. There is nothing wrong with being driven by your passion, but we all need to remember to enjoy life and learn how to relax.

My youngest daughter, Chelsea, is a beach volleyball player. During the grueling college recruiting process, everyone else in her league was receiving college scholarship commits and various accolades. She was so solid during this and refused to compare herself to anyone else; she just stayed on the steady course of playing her best. She was practically the last one in her age group to get the commit, but she was eventually recruited and accepted to Stanford University and is currently on their team. God had a plan for her and saved the best for last! It was an exercise in patience and faith.

The mistake so many of us make as women is to constantly look at other’s paths and to compare ourselves, our careers, our finances, our bodies, and even our men with envy. We have to always know our life is unique and that we have our own wonderful path. We can be happy for others and their successes, but we must seek and embrace our own path and timing.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Vrhm: I live in the world of docs. I was fortunate enough to be asked to judge the DGA Documentary Category for several years, and I absolutely loved watching around 50 docs at the end of each year! So, although there are worthy narrative films, I will give you my top three female-directed documentaries. I can’t pick just one.

Laura Poitras’ “Citizen Four.” Do I really need to say why on this one? For a filmmaker to take such risks and put herself in danger for a story that is so relevant and important for us all to hear — wow!

Lucy Walker’s “The Crash Reel.” Mine is a family of athletes, and I love documentaries that follow athletics. I was particularly drawn to Walker’s storytelling and access, which involved 20 years of filming! The audience really feels like they are part of Kevin Pearce’s life. She ends the film with what is, in essence, a call for action and change regarding helmet regulations. So impactful. Brava, Lucy!

Liz Garbus’ “What Happened, Miss Simone?” This film resonated with all of us as we were making “Mankiller.” Garbus captures the talent and beauty of Nina Simone. Simultaneously, she takes us on the ever so epic and sad journey of a life dedicated to civil rights and justice for the marginalized. The archival footage, old flyers, and personal handwritten notes were really impactful. I love Simone’s music, so this film was just pure joy to watch, even though it left me melancholy — as it should. I am definitely a Garbus fan!

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Vrhm: I am absolutely optimistic about positive change in our industry, and part of the “Wilma Mankiller life motto” is to never, never give up. Sexism still exists, but things are changing — and women are at the forefront of the shift.

I consider Gale a role model; she is clearly one of the most prolific, powerful, and successful producers in Hollywood. Yet, I notice that she typically doesn’t refer to herself as a‘woman producer or a female filmmaker — she is simply a very, very good producer. She achieved her success by tons of hard work, long hours, perseverance, talent, dedication, and intelligence. She is also a very strong advocate and mentor. She helps others. My own career as a filmmaker wouldn’t be where it is without her.

We simply have to keep making good films and telling impactful stories. If we do this, nothing can hold us back. I realize the numbers in mainstream studio film and episodic television are pretty abysmal, but I do see more positive change in independents and docs — the female voice in those areas strong and increasing.

https://medium.com/media/d25967eeb2e11b495462317fbf796ebd/href

Laff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Valerie Red-Horse Mohl — “Mankiller” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Emmy in Reach for Docs That Ran in the Oscar Race

Emmy in Reach for Docs That Ran in the Oscar Race
Thanks to such deep-pocketed streamers as Netflix, Amazon and now Hulu, the campaign to win an Oscar for documentary has evolved into a pricey, cutthroat endeavor. But the fight for a little gold man doesn’t end after the Academy Awards — it starts right back up again for the Primetime Emmy race.

While an Oscar and Emmy recognize excellence in film and television, respectively, docs are in a unique position. They can be eligible for both awards because without funding from small-screen distributors such as HBO, Netflix and PBS, the majority of docs in the Oscar race would never exist.

Mounting an Emmy campaign after an Oscar nomination or even win hasn’t always been the standard. Oscar winners including “Born Into Brothels” (2005) and “Taxi to the Dark Side” (2008) were submitted for and won the lower-profile, non-televised News & Documentary Emmy award. But in recent years, Academy Award-winning films including “Citizenfour
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Emmy in Reach for Docs That Ran in the Oscar Race

Emmy in Reach for Docs That Ran in the Oscar Race
Thanks to such deep-pocketed streamers as Netflix, Amazon and now Hulu, the campaign to win an Oscar for documentary has evolved into a pricey, cutthroat endeavor. But the fight for a little gold man doesn’t end after the Academy Awards — it starts right back up again for the Primetime Emmy race.

While an Oscar and Emmy recognize excellence in film and television, respectively, docs are in a unique position. They can be eligible for both awards because without funding from small-screen distributors such as HBO, Netflix and PBS, the majority of docs in the Oscar race would never exist.

Mounting an Emmy campaign after an Oscar nomination or even win hasn’t always been the standard. Oscar winners including “Born Into Brothels” (2005) and “Taxi to the Dark Side” (2008) were submitted for and won the lower-profile, non-televised News & Documentary Emmy award. But in recent years, Academy Award-winning films including “Citizenfour” and this year’s Oscar winner, “O.J.: Made in America
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Amazon vs. Netflix: An Itemized Guide to What You Should Be Streaming This Year

You time is valuable, and so are both services for different reasons.War Machine (Netflix)

Although there may be a competition going on between Amazon and Netflix for subscribers, the truth is that both company’s streaming services are essential for anyone who watches a lot of movies and TV and who wants to be part of the pop culture conversations as they happen.

There’s no denying that Amazon Prime is worth the $99/year, which not only gives you access to many movies but also a good amount of music streaming and digital media access, plus faster shipping for when you actually want some sort of physical product (you can also just get video content for $8.99/month, which oddly means paying more for less).

And Netflix is still a must-have for both its exclusive and nonexclusive content, though depending on one’s usage could be best for sporadic membership rather than continued subscription — now at $120/year
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Taika Waititi Talks ‘Swingers,’ ‘A Fish Called Wanda’ and His Appreciation For Indies — Watch

Taika Waititi Talks ‘Swingers,’ ‘A Fish Called Wanda’ and His Appreciation For Indies — Watch
Tribeca Shortlist is a streaming service which curates films based on the preferences of its so-called Shortlister, who can be actors, producers, writers, directors and more (just as long as they love movies). This April, their designated Shortlister is filmmaker and actor Taika Waititi.

Known for his previous award-winning (and box office-smashing) film “The Hunt For the Wilderpeople” and his upcoming Marvel conquest “Thor: Ragnarok,” Waititi recently sat down with the good people at Tribeca Shortlist to discuss his appreciation for the indies that influenced him.

Read More: Taika Waititi Explains Why ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Was the Perfect Project to Follow ‘Hunt for the Wilderpeople

From “Swingers” to “The Thing,” in our exclusive videos, Waititi discusses how these films opened his eyes to the independent realm of filmmaking and that “cinema could be more than just giant films, blockbusters, and action films.”

Turns out, that all began when he was just
See full article at Indiewire »

11 great documentaries on Netflix

Catherine Pearson Feb 22, 2017

Documentary fans are well served by these 11 great documentary series and features, currently available on Netflix UK...

In recent years, even months, Netflix has upped its game. No longer just a site to instantly stream an old title you might have once picked up in Blockbuster, it's become a hub of quality new and original film and television and this is by no means limited to its vast selection of fiction.

See related The world of the Peaky Blinders

With the scope of possibility in visual effects and the boundlessness of imagination there are very few places we cannot explore in fiction nowadays… that is unless we explore stories that are stranger than fiction. There is a tangible thirst for the real; the overwhelming response to recent Netflix documentary Making A Murderer in the news and social media, as just one example, exposes the desire for and
See full article at Den of Geek »

American Horror Story’s Sarah Paulson joins serial killer drama Lost Girls

American Horror Story and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story star Sarah Paulson has signed on to appear in the serial killer drama Lost Girls at Amazon Studios, Entertainment Weekly has revealed.

Lost Girls is based upon Robert Kolker’s 2013 non-fiction book of the same name, and follows a Long Island mother who discovers the bodies of four murdered girls while searching for her missing daughter. It will mark the scripted film debut of documentary director Liz Garbus, with Michael Werwie penning the script.

Paulson is confirmed to appear in the seventh season of American Horror Story, and will also be seen in next year’s all-female Ocean’s Eleven reboot Ocean’s Eight.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Newswire: Sarah Paulson to hang out with non-Ryan Murphy-based murderers for a change

Variety reports that American Horror Story star and recent SAG Award winner (for her work as Marcia Clark in The People Vs. O.J. Simpson) Sarah Paulson will be switching things up soon, and hanging out with some murderers who weren’t written by Ryan Murphy for once. Paulson has signed on to star in Amazon Studios’ upcoming serial killer thriller Lost Girls.

The first narrative feature from documentarian Liz Garbus, the film will be based on a 2014 non-fiction book about a desperate mother searching for her missing daughter, ultimately stumbling onto the bodies of four murdered girls dumped on Long Island. (Their killer is still at large, apparently, in case you needed an extra dose of depressing for the day.) Paulson would presumably star as the mother, briefly indulging in a more terrestrial brand of horror, one that doesn’t involve immortal Ladys Gaga or drill-dicked addiction monsters ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Sarah Paulson to Star in Serial Killer Movie ‘Lost Girls’ for Amazon

Hot off winning a SAG Award for “The People vs. O.J.Simpson,” Sarah Paulson has come on board Amazon Studios’ serial killer drama “Lost Girls.”

Documentarian Liz Garbus is making her narrative feature film directing debut on “Lost Girls.” Michael Werwie wrote the script, based on Robert Kolker’s 2013 nonfiction book about a mother searching for her missing daughter in Long Island and discovering the murdered bodies of four girls in 2010. Kolker’s book, published in 2014, details the world of online escorts and the search for a serial killer who is still at large.

Kevin McCormick and David Kennedy are producing through their Langley Park production company. Pamela Hirsch is executive producing.

Paulson won the SAG, Emmy and Golden Globe awards for her work portraying prosecutor Marcia Clark in the FX series “The People vs. O.J.Simpson: American Crime Story.” Paulson also stars in “Rebel in the Rye” with Nicholas Hoult,
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