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The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates

Take a look at the roots of American campaign image consciousness, and the then-new techniques of cinéma vérité to bring a new 'reality' for film documentaries. Four groundbreaking films cover the Kennedy-Humphrey presidential primary, and put us in the Oval Office for a showdown against Alabama governor George Wallace. The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates Blu-ray Primary, Adventures on the New Frontier, Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment, Faces of November The Criterion Collection 808 1960 -1964 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 53, 52, 53, 12 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring John F. Kennedy, Robert F. Kennedy, Jacqueline Kennedy, Robert Drew, Hubert H. Humphrey, McGeorge Bundy, John Kenneth Galbraith, Richard Goodwin, Albert Gore Sr., Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Pierre Salinger, Haile Selassie, John Steinbeck, George Wallace, Vivian Malone, Burke Marshall, Nicholas Katzenbach, John Dore, Jack Greenberg; Lyndon Johnson, John Kennedy Jr., Caroline Kennedy, Peter Lawford. Cinematography Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, D.A. Pennebaker,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Boom Bust Boom documentary review: monkeys with money

From Monty Python’s Terry Jones comes an amusing, informative breakdown of just what the hell is wrong with the economy and a few ideas on how to fix it. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

There have been a lot of documentaries about the 2008 economic collapse, but to my knowledge, there hasn’t been one before in which a puppet of legendary economist John Kenneth Galbraith sings. There hasn’t been one before in which a member of Monty Python uses animation to explain how the 17th-century tulip mania and the 1929 stock market crash are like subprime mortgages. As actor and activist John Cusack says here, “If the 2008 crisis didn’t wake people up, I don’t know what will.” I’ve been saying that about lots of terrible events for years now, and nothing ever seems to change…
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Politically Active Actress Bergen Made into Nixon's 'Enemies List'

Polly Bergen: Actress on Richard Nixon's 'enemies list' (image: Polly Bergen publicity shot ca. late 1950s) (See previous article: "Polly Bergen Movies: First U.S. Woman President.") As discussed in the previous post, despite its deceptively progressive premise — the first United States woman president as a palpable reality — Kisses for My President, written by veteran Paramount screenwriter Claude Binyon (Search for Beauty, The Gilded Lily) and newcomer Robert G. Kane (whose sole other movie credit was the poorly received Arnold Schwarzenegger comedy Western Villain), was an unabashedly reactionary, "traditional family values" effort. Ironically, Polly Bergen, for her part, was a liberal-minded, politically active Democrat. At around the time Kisses for My President was released, Bergen, along with Gregory Peck, James Garner, and other Hollywood personalities, publicly came out against California's Proposition 14, a 1964 ballot initiative that would have nullified the Rumford Fair Housing Act, thus paving the way for
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Film Review: ‘JFK: A President Betrayed’

Film Review: ‘JFK: A President Betrayed’
JFK: A President Betrayed” is a documentary betrayed, ultimately, by its overreaching title. Despite claims of having uncovered new evidence to support its thesis that President Kennedy was pursuing a warming of the Cold War in the days leading up to his death, the doc focuses so intently on the buildup to that moment as to leave scant time to support those conclusions, and virtually none to examine the roots of Lyndon B. Johnson’s disastrous escalation in Vietnam. In addition, the movie vaguely implies that Kennedy’s opposition to a hawkish military establishment might have cost him his life — an assertion made in the movie “JFK” and any number of conspiracy theories, but again, mere speculation in historical terms.

Amid a deluge of Kennedy docs, this one — written, directed, edited and co-produced by Cory Taylor, and classily narrated by Morgan Freeman — lands on DirecTV On Demand before a limited
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘JFK: A President Betrayed’

Film Review: ‘JFK: A President Betrayed’
JFK: A President Betrayed” is a documentary betrayed, ultimately, by its overreaching title. Despite claims of having uncovered new evidence to support its thesis that President Kennedy was pursuing a warming of the Cold War in the days leading up to his death, the doc focuses so intently on the buildup to that moment as to leave scant time to support those conclusions, and virtually none to examine the roots of Lyndon B. Johnson’s disastrous escalation in Vietnam. In addition, the movie vaguely implies that Kennedy’s opposition to a hawkish military establishment might have cost him his life — an assertion made in the movie “JFK” and any number of conspiracy theories, but again, mere speculation in historical terms.

Amid a deluge of Kennedy docs, this one — written, directed, edited and co-produced by Cory Taylor, and classily narrated by Morgan Freeman — lands on DirecTV On Demand before a limited
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Why Unions Are Worth Fighting For

The unions' fight with Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker over collective bargaining may not end their slide into irrelevance, but it has shown their necessity as workers' advocate and much-needed balance to the political system.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's effort two weeks ago to end collective bargaining for public employees in his state was the worst thing to happen to the union movement in recent memory-until it unexpectedly became the best thing to happen to the union movement in recent memory. Give the man some credit: In seven days, Walker did what unions have been trying and failing to do for decades. He united the famously fractious movement, reknit its emotional connection with allies ranging from students to national Democratic leaders, and brought the decline of organized labor to the forefront of the national agenda. The question is: Will it matter?

Related story on The Daily Beast: Arlen Specter's Revenge

At this point,
See full article at The Daily Beast »

The Peace Corps' Determined Father

Sargent Shriver's signature achievement was no sure thing. Peace Corps volunteer John Coyne on how Shriver worked the levers in a skeptical Washington to make a dream come true. Plus, George McGovern on Shriver's "boundless heart" and Adam Clymer on how Shriver changed America.

In the Peace Corps of the early 1960s, to "Shriverize" an idea meant to enlarge it and apply greater imagination, and then speed up its execution. As an English major, I had never heard the word, but as I learned the lingua franca of the new Peace Corps, this verb would change my life. A Midwestern Catholic boy, I had come of age with the presidency of John F. Kennedy and was a small part of the New Frontier as a Peace Corps volunteer. Like thousands of others, I was going off to change the world. And I was Shriverized by the man himself, R.
See full article at The Daily Beast »

[DVD Review] Plunder: The Crime of Our Time

Plunder: The Crime of Our Time, at its heart, is a film championing the little guy — the wronged, screwed-over, little guy. It knows no neutrality, blatantly decrying the misdeeds of the wealthy (at least the dishonest wealthy, but come on — is there really any other kind?) and standing up for the people cheated by these misdeeds.

Plunder, Danny "the News Dissector" Schechter's look into how closely Wall Street influenced — even caused — the financial crisis in which we're living today, focuses on those at fault, and the reactions of the citizens most directly affected by the so-called "Second Depression." Schechter conducts interview after interview with economic analysts and experts, as well as journalists, and even Sam Antar, the former Cpa of Crazy Eddie, Inc. and a convicted white-collar criminal, who dishes the dirt on his colleagues. Protesters, usually homeowners who took the brunt of the injustice, were filmed swarming the offenders
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Oil Companies--Some Run by Former Bush Officials--Make a Risky Move Into Kurdistan

Photograph by Dan Winters

An Iraqi Kurdish soldier stands guard at the Tawke oil field in the Dohuk province of Iraqi Kurdistan. | Photograph by Muhannad Fala'ah/Getty Images

In their haste to tap Kurdish reserves, dozens of oil companies -- several fronted by former Bush officials -- have undercut U.S. policy and fanned sectarian tensions in Iraq. They may also lose a fortune.

Map by Mike Reagan

Infographic: Combustible 

The Tawke oil field, just south of Iraq's mountainous border with Turkey, is a bare, windblown patch of hills in one of the Middle East's most isolated corners.

Three hundred miles north of Baghdad, it is also four hours by road from the nearest international airfield and hundreds of miles from the nearest seaport. But on April 12, 2005, more than 100 dignitaries from around the world trooped up to this bleak turf to observe a bit of history. One year earlier, a
See full article at Fast Company »

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