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Leonard Frey Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Trivia (4) | Personal Quotes (2)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 4 September 1938Brooklyn, New York, USA
Date of Death 24 August 1988New York, USA  (AIDS)

Mini Bio (1)

Leonard Frey originally wanted to become an artist, but in college he became interested in acting. He made his stage debut in an off-Broadway production of "Little Mary Sunshine" and his film debut as a celebrant in Passages from James Joyce's Finnegans Wake (1966), but he first rose to prominence in the role of Harold, the self-proclaimed "Jew fairy", in both the stage and screen versions of The Boys in the Band (1970). Frey is probably best known for the role of Motel, the timid tailor, in Fiddler on the Roof (1971); this performance landed him a nomination for a Supporting Actor Oscar. He continued to work on stage, in films and on TV throughout the 1970s and 1980s, but he never again attained the level of critical success he enjoyed in "Fiddler on the Roof". In 1988 he died from complications related to AIDS.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: TPK

Trivia (4)

Studied acting at New York City's prestigious Neighborhood Playhouse under famed acting coach Sanford Meisner.
Though known for his portrayal of "Motel" in Fiddler on the Roof (1971), he originally played "Mendel", the rabbi's son, in the 1964 Broadway show.
Was nominated for Broadway's 1975 Tony Award as Best Supporting or Featured Actor (Dramatic) for "The National Health."
He was nominated for a 1979 Joseph Jefferson Award for Guest Artist for his role in "Two-Part Invention" at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois.

Personal Quotes (2)

[on his role as Mendel, the Rabbi's son in the original Broadway production of "Fiddler on the Roof"] "It was originally a very small part, no more than a cough and a 'Mazel tof' but it got bigger."
[on playing the role of Motel, the Tailor, in Fiddler on the Roof (1971)] I'm grateful to The Boys in the Band (1970) but I started to get paranoid that I'd reach old age with people still thinking of me only as Harold - if they thought of me at all. Since 'Fiddler,' I've stopped worrying."

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