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For The Postseason: Joe E. Brown As Alibi Ike

If you’re a baseball fan, particularly if you’re a Dodgers, Astros, Cubs or Yankees fan, the real baseball season started this past Friday with the inauguration of the American and National League Championship Series. I’m a Dodgers fan, which means I’m among that group who, arguably, have gone the longest without the satisfaction/excitement/nail-biting terror of seeing their team in the World Series, the next step for whoever wins in the Nlcs. The Dodgers last appeared in the World Series in 1988, capping a memorable run with a championship by beating the Oakland A’s. That was 29 years ago. The Cubs are the reigning Mlb champions, having won last year’s World Series after a 107-year drought. And the Yankees, a mainstay of the World Series around the turn of this century, last appeared in an October championship series in 2009.

The only team to come close
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Bob Hope on Blu-ray

You pick up a lot of baggage when you live to be 100, a sentiment confirmed by the long, long movie career of Bob Hope. His unofficial status as the preeminent entertainer of the 20th century is open to debate but he was without a doubt that era’s most conspicuous comedian. Marlon Brando’s infamous dismissal, “He’ll go to the opening of a market to receive an award”, was mean-spirited but it had the sting of truth; for over eighty years Hope was everywhere, for better or worse.

Living up to his nickname, “Rapid Robert”, the 31-year old Hope shot out of the gate in 1934 with a series of quick-on-their feet comic shorts revolving around his unique presence as a leading man and comical sidekick rolled into one. It wasn’t long before he was starring in pleasantly prosaic musicals like The Big Broadcast of 1938 and handsomely mounted
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A Movie About the Legendary Life of Lucille Ball Is in the Works, and It Already Has Its Star

Image Source: Everett Collection Lucille Ball is one of the most legendary actresses from Hollywood's golden era. Not only was she a pioneer for independent women to carve their own career paths and not take no for an answer, but she was also an insanely talented actress whose show, I Love Lucy, is still beloved to this day. It should come as no surprise, then, that a biopic about her life and career is in the works at Amazon. While we've always been apprehensive about movies surrounding Lucy (she's so iconic that it's almost best to leave her story alone), we're actually pretty excited for this one. Not only is the authorized project, titled Lucy and Desi, being produced by Lucille and Desi Arnaz's children, Lucie and Desi Jr., but it already has its star! Keep reading to see everything we know about the biopic so far. The Story
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Cate Blanchett Is Lucille Ball in Amazon Biopic Lucy and Desi

Cate Blanchett Is Lucille Ball in Amazon Biopic Lucy and Desi
It was recently announced that Amazon had acquired the rights to Lucy and Desi, the Aaron Sorkin scripted drama biopic and now it has also been revealed that Academy Award winning actress Cate Blanchett is set to portray Lucille Ball in the project. The biopic is being produced by Ball and Desi Arnaz's children and will center on their iconic mother, Lucille Ball. It has not been announced who will play Desi Arnaz yet, but Javier Barden's name has reportedly come up more than once.

The Hollywood Reporter revealed that Cate Blanchett will star as Ball and that the story will revolve around the actress who starred in the TV sitcoms I love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, Here's Lucy, and Life with Lucy. The Lucy and Desi biopic was announced back in 2015 with the idea to tell the story of Ball and Arnaz's 20 year marriage
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Blanchett as Lucille Ball is Finally A Go!

Chris here. Remember a few years back when we first got word that Cate Blanchett was itching to play legend Lucille Ball? Well, the film is now happening thanks to getting picked up by Amazon and set on the fast track.

Lucy And Desi will follow the twenty year marriage of the notoriously embattled couple over the start of their Desilu Productions and I Love Lucy. The script comes from Aaron Sorkin, so expect reems of snappy dialogue and perhaps some timely contextualization - just imagine the drama of Blanchett delivering Sorkinese. No word on a director yet but it wouldn't surprise if those reigns become Sorkin's as well, with his Jessica Chastain-led directorial Molly's Game coming this fall.

Just as exciting as the prospect of Blanchett making a redheaded return to the screen is who might also fill Desi Arnaz's shoes and the rest of the legendary ensemble.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Newswire: Amazon picks up Lucille Ball biopic starring Cate Blanchett

It’s been about two years since we learned that Cate Blanchett would star in a Lucille Ball biopic being written by Aaron Sorkin, whose scripts require his actors to dole out speeches and barbs at a pace not unlike that candy conveyor belt. Now Variety reports that there’s a distribution home for all the Club Tropicana and “Vitameatavegamin” hijinks. Amazon has acquired the film, which is being produced by Escape ArtistsTodd Black, Jason Blumenthal, and Steve Tisch.

We haven’t seen Blanchett work an assembly line before, but the Oscar-winning actress is more than capable of keeping up with whatever clip Sorkin establishes for the dialogue. The search for a Desi Arnaz, Ball’s husband on and off camera (for a while), continues, as does the hunt for Fred and Ethel portrayers Vivian Vance and William Frawley. But the film will draw from Ball and Arnaz’s
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Amazon Buys Lucille Ball Biopic Starring Cate Blanchett

Amazon Buys Lucille Ball Biopic Starring Cate Blanchett
Amazon Studios has acquired the Lucille Ball biopic “Lucy and Desi,” with Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett attached to star.

Aaron Sorkin has written the script. Escape Artists is the production company with Todd Black, Jason Blumenthal and Steve Tisch producing.

The producers are seeking a star to play Ball’s husband Desi Arnaz as well as Vivian Vance and William Frawley, who played Fred and Ethel Mertz in the landmark sitcom “I Love Lucy.”

The project attracted Blanchett and Sorkin two years ago. “Lucy and Desi” will center on Ball’s 20-year marriage to Desi Arnaz. She eloped with the Cuban bandleader in 1940, and the two created the massively successful sitcom “I Love Lucy” in 1951 through their Desilu Productions. She won four Emmys for the role.

Ball also gave birth to her daughter in 1951 and to her son in 1953. Ball and Arnaz divorced in 1960, and Ball began running Desilu Productions in 1962. She died in 1989.

Blanchett has won Academy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC

Marlene Dietrich in “Shanghai Express”: mptvimages.com/IMDb

If you’re a fan of actress, camp icon, and anti-fascist Marlene Dietrich or want to learn more about her, you’re in luck. The Metrograph theater in New York City is hosting “Marlene,” a retrospective featuring 19 of Dietrich’s films. The festivities kicked off May 23 and will continue until July 8.

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich was born in Berlin in 1901. Dietrich began her career as a vaudeville performer in Weimar Germany. She moved to Hollywood and eventually became a revered film actress, “bisexual sex symbol, willful camp icon, [and] paragon of feminine glamour” — “comfortable in top hat and tails, ballgown, or gorilla suit.” But the actress did not forget about what was happening back home in Germany; Dietrich became involved in the fight against fascism during WWII. She “used her likeness to fundraise for Jewish refugees escaping Nazi Germany and performed on Uso tours, earning her the Metal of Freedom and Légion d’honneur by the French government,” the press release details. Dietrich died in 1992 at the age of 90.

The “Marlene” retrospective will feature Dietrich’s seven films with director Josef von Sternberg: “The Blue Angel,” “Morocco,” “Blonde Venus,” “Dishonored,” “Shanghai Express,” “The Devil Is A Woman,” and “The Scarlet Empress.” The actress’ collaborations with Alfred Hitchcock (“Stage Fright”), Orson Welles (“Touch of Evil”), and Billy Wilder (“A Foreign Affair”) are among the other films screening at the Metrograph. A documentary about Dietrich, Maximilian Schell’s “Marlene,” will also screen. All of the films, besides “Marlene,” will be shown in 35mm.

Head over to The Metrograph’s site for showtimes and more information. The featured films and their synopses are below, courtesy of the Metrograph.

Angel

1937 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Ernst Lubitsch

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Melvyn Douglas

While English statesman Herbert Marshall worries over international affairs, his glamorous wife (Dietrich) concerns herself with, well, international affairs, beginning a tryst with a dashing stranger (Melvyn Douglas) who she only allows to know her as “Angel.” Dietrich’s last film on her Paramount contract is a spry, surprising love triangle, one of the least-known of Lubitsch’s essential works from his Midas touch period.

Blonde Venus

1932 / 93min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Herbert Marshall, Cary Grant

A.k.a “The One with the Gorilla Suit,” which Dietrich dons to perform her big number “Hot Voodoo.” It’s all for a good cause: she’s an ex-nightclub chanteuse who’s gone back to work to pay for husband Herbert Marshall’s radium poisoning treatments, though she later allows herself to become the plaything of Cary Grant’s dashing young millionaire, earning only contempt for her sacrifice.

Der Blaue Engel

1930 / 106min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings, Kurt Gerron, Rosa Valetti

Mild-mannered, uptight schoolteacher Emil Jannings lives a faultlessly law-abiding, by-the-book existence, but it’s all over when he gets a glimpse of Dietrich’s nightclub chanteuse Lola-Lola, and is immediately ready to ruin himself for her amusement. The first collaboration between Dietrich and von Sternberg made her an international star, and linked her forever to her seductive, world-weary delivery of the song “Falling in Love Again.” We’re showing the German-language version, preceded by a four-minute-long Dietrich screen test.

Desire

1936 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Frank Borzage

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, John Halliday, William Frawley

Dietrich and Gary Cooper reunite in this delightful urbane comedy by Borzage, a master of romantic delirium, here working somewhat after the style of producer Ernst Lubitsch. La Dietrich’s stylish jewel thief stashes a clutch of pearls in the pocket of an upstanding American businessman, and while trying to get back the goods she can’t help but notice the big lug isn’t half bad-looking. An excuse to recall the following lines from the 1936 Times review: “Lubitsch, the Gay Emancipator, has freed Dietrich from von Sternberg’s artistic bondage.” Those were the days.

Destry Rides Again

1939 / 94min / 35mm

Director: George Marshall

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart, Mischa Auer, Charles Winninger

Jimmy Stewart, still in his rangy, impossibly-good-looking phase, is a marshal who sets out to clean up the wide-open town of Bottleneck without firing a shot in this charming Western musical comedy. The local roughnecks present him one kind of challenge; Dietrich’s saloon singer Frenchy, belting out her rowdy standard “The Boys in the Back Room,” quite another.

The Devil Is A Woman

1935 / 80min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Lionel Atwill, Edward Everett Horton

Dietrich and von Sternberg’s final collaboration, and an apotheosis of sorts. In Spain in the early years of the 20th century, Lionel Atwill’s loyal suitor Pasqualito and the revolutionary Cesar Romero are teased into a frenzy by legendary coquette Concha (Guess who?). The coolly scrolling camera and baroque compositions are courtesy of an uncredited Lucien Ballard and Von Sternberg himself, doing double duty as cinematographer.

Dishonored

1931 / 91min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen

Dietrich plays X-27, a Mata Hari-esque spy for the Austrian Secret Service tasked with using a bevy of costume changes (Russian peasant, feathered helmet, leather jumpsuit) to gather information on the Russians during World War I. Outrageous plotting, high chiaroscuro style, and the star’s earthy sensuality mark this unforgettable pre-code treasure, beloved by Godard and Fassbinder both. Says Victor McLaglen: “the more you cheat and the more you lie, the more exciting you become.”

A Foreign Affair

1948 / 116min / 35mm

Director: Billy Wilder

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jean Arthur, John Lund, Millard Mitchell

Against the backdrop of a ruined postwar Berlin, another conflict is just heating up, as Dietrich’s cabaret singer with rumored Nazi ties vies with Jean Arthur’s Iowa congresswoman-on-a-fact-finding-mission for the affection of American officer John Lund. Wilder’s penultimate collaboration with co-writer Charles Brackett is a black comic delight full of crackling, piquant dialogue, and Dietrich’s knowing slow-burn has never been better.

Judgment At Nuremberg

1961 / 186min / 35mm

Director: Stanley Kramer

Cast: Spencer Tracy, Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Marlene Dietrich, Maximilian Schell, Judy Garland, Montgomery Clift, William Shatner

Dietrich’s last truly substantial screen appearance came as part of the ensemble for Kramer’s courtroom drama, playing the widow of a German general executed by the Allies who’s befriended by investigating judge Spencer Tracy in this fictionalized retelling of the events of a 1947 military tribunal addressing war crimes by civilians under the Third Reich. Rounding out the all-star cast are Burt Lancaster, Richard Widmark, Judy Garland, William Shatner, and Maximilian Schell, who would win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and later directed a portrait of Dietrich.

The Lady Is Willing

1942 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Mitchell Leisen

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Fred MacMurray, Aline MacMahon, Stanley Ridges

Leisen, considered a comic talent on-par with Lubitsch during the screwball era, lends characteristic sparkle to this mid-career attempt at reconfiguring Dietrich’s very 1930s star persona to fit the needs of the 1940s women’s picture; here she plays a glamor-gal diva whose life changes when she discovers a baby on Eighth Avenue and decides to adopt, passing through melodramatic coincidences and a vale of tears before falling into the arms of Fred MacMurray.

Lola

1981 / 113min / 35mm

Director: Rainer Werner Fassbinder

Cast: Barbara Sukowa, Armin Mueller-stahl, Mario Adorf, Matthias Fuchs

Dietrich had for all purposes retired from the screen by the time that Fassbinder began his frontal assault on West German popular culture, but her image and her unlikely combination of cool irony and torrid emotion left a profound mark on his films. Lola, the candy-colored, late-1950s-set capstone of his “Brd Trilogy” in particular draws heavily from The Blue Angel, with bordello singer Barbara Sukowa torn between Mario Adorf’s sugar daddy and Armin Mueller-Stahl’s incoming building commissioner in boomtown Coburg.

Marlene

1984 / 94min / Digital

Director: Maximilian Schell

More than twenty years after Schell had co-starred with Dietrich in Judgment at Nuremberg, during which period she’d retired to a life of very private seclusion, he tried to get her to participate in a documentary about her life. She finally gave in — sort of. Dietrich offered only her memories and her famous voice, refusing to appear on camera, but necessity became a boon to the resulting film, a sort of guided tour of Dietrich’s life and work, which simultaneously reveals much and deepens her mystery.

Morocco

1930 / 92min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Gary Cooper, Adolphe Menjou

After The Blue Angel, shot in Germany, was a hit, von Sternberg was given full run of the Paramount backlot, where he would conjure up all manner of exotic destinations out of thin air. First stop: North Africa, where French legionnaire Gary Cooper competes with sugar daddy Adolphe Menjou for the favors of Dietrich’s cabaret star Amy Jolly, who in one scene famously rocks a men’s tailcoat and plants a smooch on a female fan.

Rancho Notorious

1952 / 89min / 35mm

Director: Fritz Lang

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Arthur Kennedy, Mel Ferrer, William Frawley

Teutons Lang and Dietrich team up in a Technicolor wild west of deliberate, garish artifice in this singularly claustrophobic oater, in which a revenge-mad Burt Kennedy goes looking for his fiancée’s killers at a hideaway inn run by Dietrich, and discovers dangerous, unbidden desires instead. As the chant of the film’s recurring, persecutorial Brechtian ballad goes: “Hate, murder, and revenge.”

The Scarlet Empress

1934 / 104min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, John Lodge, Sam Jaffe, Louise Dresser

Have ever a screen persona and a historical personage found such a hand-in-glove-fit as did Dietrich and Empress Catherine the Great of Russia? While the Motion Picture Production Code was preparing to chasten American movies, Dietrich and von Sternberg got together to throw one last lavish S & M orgy, a flamboyant film of 18th century palace intrigues and ludicrously lapidary décor.

Shanghai Express

1932 / 82min / 35mm

Director: Josef Von Sternberg

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Clive Brook, Anna May Wong

“It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” proclaims Marlene Dietrich with the disdain of an empress, though in fact she’s a high-class courtesan, re-encountering former lover Clive Brook on an express train rolling through civil war-wracked China. The fourth of Dietrich and von Sternberg’s collaborations is a riot of delirious chinoiserie artifice and sculpted shadowplay — Dietrich’s co-star Anna May Wong was never again shot so caressingly.

The Song Of Songs

1933 / 90min / 35mm

Director: Rouben Mamoulian

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Brian Aherne, Lionel Atwill

So often the instrument of corruption, Mamoulian’s film allows Dietrich to be the corrupted one, playing a country girl, Lily, who comes to big-city Berlin and quickly becomes the model and muse of sculptor Brian Aherne. Lionel Atwill’s preening decadent Baron von Merzbach admires Lily’s nude form in marble, and decides to bring the original home with him, where she slips into the role of the cynical sophisticate, though her heart remains with the artist.

Stage Fright

1950 / 110min / 35mm

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Jane Wyman, Michael Wilding, Richard Todd, Alastair Sim

Hitchcock’s last film in his native England until 1972’s Frenzy is an audaciously-structured thriller, making use of an extended flashback and a whiplash narrative about-face. Acting student Jane Wyman tries to save beau Robert Todd from taking the fall for a murder committed by stage star Dietrich, who shows her hypnotic charm in a show-stopper performance of “I’m the Laziest Gal in Town.”

Touch Of Evil

1958 / 95min / 35mm

Director: Orson Welles

Cast: Marlene Dietrich, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Orson Welles

It’s not the size of the part, but what you do with it. Playing a brothel keeper in a seedy border town in Welles’s magnificently baroque late noir, Dietrich only has a clutch of lines, but they’re the ones you remember, whether her famous requiem for crooked cop Hank Quinlan, or her reading of his “fortune”: “Your future’s all used up.” Bold and self-evidently brilliant, you could use Touch of Evil to explain the concept of great cinema to a visiting Martian.

Marlene Dietrich Retrospective Screening at the Metrograph in NYC was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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I Love Lucy: CBS Announces Christmas Special with Newly Colorized Episodes

The Tiffany Network knows you need a good laugh. CBS is celebrating the holidays by airing the I Love Lucy Christmas Special. The hourlong special will feature colorized versions of the I Love Lucy TV show's "The Christmas Episode" and "Lucy Gets in Pictures" episode as a seamless hour.Lucille Balll, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley star with Keith Thibodeaux, and Lou Krugman. Learn more, from this CBS press release. The I Love Lucy Christmas Special airs on CBS, Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 at 8:00pm. Read More…
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Strike Me Pink

Neurotic coward Eddie Cantor decides to defend an amusement park against gangsters, and nothing but fun ensues! Ethel Merman has a small role here, but we're more than entertained by Parkyakarkus, Brian Donlevy, William Frawley, Jack Larue. Plus Sally Eilers, the Goldwyn Girls and a terrific forgotten talent, billed in this movie as Rita Rio. Strike Me Pink DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 100 min. / Street Date August 4,, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Eddie Cantor, Ethel Merman, Sally Eilers, Parkyakarkus, Rita Rio (Dona Drake), Brian Donlevy, William Frawley, Jack Larue, Gordon Jones, Helen Lowell The Goldwyn Girls. Cinematography Merritt Gerstad, Gregg Toland Film Editor Sherman Todd Original Music (Alfred Newman) Dance Director Robert Alton Special Effects Gilbert Pratt, Ray Binger, Paul Eagler Written by Francis Martin, Frank Butler, Walter Deleon from the story and novel Dreamland by Clarence Buddington Kelland Produced by Samuel Goldwyn Directed by
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CBS airs New I Love Lucy Superstar Special featuring John Wayne

Watch two colorized episodes of the classic I Love Lucy TV series in a one-hour special on CBS Friday, May 20, at 8pm Et/Pt. The October 1955 episodes “Lucy Visits Grauman’s” and “Lucy and John Wayne” are a two-part story about Lucy (Lucille Ball) taking screen legend John Wayne’s cement footprints as a souvenir from Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood. The two episodes are presented as one continuous story for this special. Desi Arnaz also stars as Ricky Ricardo, and Vivian Vance and William Frawley play the Ricardos’ best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The episodes also feature a guest … Continue reading →

The post CBS airs New I Love Lucy Superstar Special featuring John Wayne appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine.
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I Love Lucy: CBS Special Gets New Night

[caption id="attachment_48558" align="aligncenter" width="448"] Image courtesy CBS./caption]

Hey, Lucy lovers, CBS has bumped up its colorized I Love Lucy TV show special by two nights. The I Love Lucy special will now air Friday, May 20 at 8:00pm Et/Pt. Originally, it was slated for Sunday night of that weekend.

I Love Lucy stars Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz as Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. Vivian Vance and William Frawley co-star as Fred and Ethel Mertz. In the special, two consecutive episodes guest starring John Wayne as a fictional version of himself, have been edited together to tell one complete story. Previously they have only aired separately.

Read More…
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I Love Lucy: CBS to Air Colorized Special in May

I love Lucy. You love Lucy. CBS loves I Love Lucy. The Tiffany Network is airing two classic I Love Lucy TV series episodes, Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 8:00pm Et/Pt. "Lucy Visits Grauman's" and "Lucy and John Wayne," have been colorized with what CBS calls, "...a vintage look, reminiscent of the 1950s period in which they were filmed." Watch a black and white clip of "Lucy and John Wayne," below.

I Love Lucy stars Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz as Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. Vivian Vance and William Frawley co-star as Fred and Ethel Mertz. Joseph A. Mayer and Michael Mayer play Little Ricky Ricardo. In the second episode, Ralph Volkie plays George -- John Wayne's masseur. Although previously they have only aired separately, the two episodes are the first and second halves of one complete story.

Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Ed Lauter Exemplified Versatility, Authenticity in Character Actor’s Craft

Ed Lauter Exemplified Versatility, Authenticity in Character Actor’s Craft
Being one of the top character actors of American film and television must be the ultimate double-edged career sword.

On the one hand, if you’re good — and the late Ed Lauter was one of American cinema’s great character actors — you work all the time. On the other hand, as Lauter told Shock Cinema magazine back in 2010, “Sometimes people don’t know my name. They’ll say, ‘Oh, yeah! There’s that guy! You were in … Jesus Christ … you were in … in …’ So, in a way it’s good — and in a way it’s bad.”

Lauter was not alone in his plight. He and his fellow character actors who consistently deliver the goods have been a mainstay of American cinema since the days of the Hollywood’s “stock players,” a moniker that devalues the work of great performers from Hattie McDaniel to Peter Lorre, from Sidney Greenstreet to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cate Blanchett is playing Lucille Ball. Here's who should play her costars.

  • Hitfix
Cate Blanchett is playing Lucille Ball. Here's who should play her costars.
I'm almost done gawking at the fact that Cate Blanchett will star in a Lucille Ball biopic written by Aaron Sorkin. It's shocking. It's more like a Mad Lib to me than a news story, still.   The Sorkin element is actually the most surprising part. I guess he has some mansplainin' to do. While we think about whether Blanchett has the comic chops to play Lucy Ricardo (since she certainly has the glamor factor necessary for the real Lucille Ball), let's offer up suggestions to play her castmates Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley. Oscar Isaac as Desi Arnaz Arnaz, who was almost six years younger than Ball, began "I Love Lucy" in his mid thirties. That's a perfect fit for Isaac, who's 36. Considering Isaac's, um, sharp tone in "Drive" and believable musicianship in "Inside Llewyn Davis," I'd say he's the obvious frontrunner here. Margo Martindale as Vivian Vance Sure,
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Early Black Film Actor Has His Day

Rex Ingram in 'The Thief of Bagdad' 1940 with tiny Sabu. Actor Rex Ingram movies on TCM: Early black film performer in 'Cabin in the Sky,' 'Anna Lucasta' It's somewhat unusual for two well-known film celebrities, whether past or present, to share the same name.* One such rarity is – or rather, are – the two movie people known as Rex Ingram;† one an Irish-born white director, the other an Illinois-born black actor. Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” continues today, Aug. 11, '15, with a day dedicated to the latter. Right now, TCM is showing Cabin in the Sky (1943), an all-black musical adaptation of the Faust tale that is notable as the first full-fledged feature film directed by another Illinois-born movie person, Vincente Minnelli. Also worth mentioning, the movie marked Lena Horne's first important appearance in a mainstream motion picture.§ A financial disappointment on the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Astaire Dances Everywhere Today on TCM

Fred Astaire ca. 1935. Fred Astaire movies: Dancing in the dark, on the ceiling on TCM Aug. 5, '15, is Fred Astaire Day on Turner Classic Movies, as TCM continues with its “Summer Under the Stars” series. Just don't expect any rare Astaire movies, as the actor-singer-dancer's star vehicles – mostly Rko or MGM productions – have been TCM staples since the early days of the cable channel in the mid-'90s. True, Fred Astaire was also featured in smaller, lesser-known fare like Byron Chudnow's The Amazing Dobermans (1976) and Yves Boisset's The Purple Taxi / Un taxi mauve (1977), but neither one can be found on the TCM schedule. (See TCM's Fred Astaire movie schedule further below.) Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals Some fans never tire of watching Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers dancing together. With these particular fans in mind, TCM is showing – for the nth time – nine Astaire-Rogers musicals of the '30s,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

CBS resurrects ‘I Love Lucy’ for colorized one-hour special

In a move that may both thrill and horrify classic TV fans, CBS announced today it will air two more colorized episodes of I Love Lucy in a one-hour special in May. The network said the episodes will retain “a vintage look” and contain material not seen since the programs originally aired in the 1950s.

The episodes chosen for resurrection are 1955’s “L.A. at Last,” in which Lucy makes a bad impression on William Holden when the Ricardos and Mertzes visit the Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood, and 1957’s “Lucy and Superman,” which centers around Lucy trying to make good on her promise to bring Adventures of Superman star George Reeves to Little Ricky’s birthday party.

In 2013, CBS packaged two colorized I Love Lucy episodes in a Christmas special. Conceived as cheap holiday fare to fill a hole in its December schedule, The I Love Lucy Christmas Special ended up winning the night.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Summer sitcom rewind: 'I Love Lucy' - 'Job Switching'

  • Hitfix
Summer sitcom rewind: 'I Love Lucy' - 'Job Switching'
We're continuing this periodic summer project where we revisit classic sitcom episode. This week we're going waaaay back to the 1950s for one of the most famous television half hours of them all: "Job Switching," from "I Love Lucy" season 2, coming up just as soon as I show you the creases on these silk stockings... "Job Switching," which first aired in 1952, is by far going to be the oldest episode we do in this series (unless "The Honeymooners" magically starts streaming before the summer is out), and I'm going to be very curious for your reactions to it. Ken Levine occasionally will do posts where he asks his readers what they think of vintage sitcom episodes, and the reaction tends to be mixed, and leaning more towards negative among people who didn't grow up in one of the previous peak periods for multi-cam comedy. In terms of sitcoms that have
See full article at Hitfix »

“For Mature Audiences Only”: treasured TV oldsters of yesteryear

Some may say that television hasn’t been too good to senior citizens in terms of their stereotypical depictions. Regardless of the unflattering portrayals there had been some memorable oldsters (in this case over 60) that have given us equal shares of both laughs and cries. In “For Mature Audiences Only”, let’s take a look at some of the more mature characterizations that had an impact on our daily doses of entertainment on the glorious boob tube.

Instead of doing a typical top ten or top twenty listing let’s go in between with a top fifteen selection, shall we? The “For Mature Audiences Only” choices are not necessarily a tasting that everyone will agree on. Perhaps you have your own preferences that were omitted or something that you feel should be added? Anyway, here are the candidates in alphabetical order…

Now for our pop cultural Pepto Bismol personalities:

1.) Doc Galen Adams,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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