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Watch the trailer for acclaimed documentary Freedom for the Wolf

Following its European premiere earlier this month, we have a poster and trailer for the acclaimed documentary Freedom for the Wolf; check them out here, along with the official synopsis…

Democracy is in crisis. A new generation of elected leaders are dismantling freedom and democracy as we know it. A ground-breaking, powerful and original statement on the status of quo of global politics, Freedom For The Wolf is the first film that provides the global context for understanding the Trump phenomenon.

Filmed over three years in five countries, from the young Umbrella movement students of HongKong, to a rapper in post-Arab Spring Tunisia and the viral comedians of Bollywood, we discover how people from every corner of the globe are fighting the same struggle. They are fighting against elected leaders who trample on human rights, minorities, and their political opponents.

Freedom for the Wolf is directed by Rupert Russell, with
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Stroke: when words fail you

As BBC4 film Speechless marks World Stroke Day, documentary producer Nick Fraser reflects on his own recovery following a brain attack in February

I was just finishing a talk about documentaries I was giving in Soho. I’d been asked a question about why so many films are seriously depressing. I remember that I talked about the great neurosurgeon Henry Marsh and the documentary about him, The English Surgeon. The film followed him to Ukraine as he helped and taught the local surgeons, who often resorted to using rusty domestic power tools to work on their patients’ skulls. I’d talked about him for some time, enthusiastically explaining how awed Henry said he felt every time he opened a patient’s head, and about how beautiful the brain is. I wanted to say more – but suddenly I sat down, and couldn’t say or think anything. Something had happened to me.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BAFTA TV Awards Crown ‘Fleabag,’ ‘Happy Valley’

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts have announced the year’s winners for British TV’s highest honors. Presented May 14 at London’s Royal Festival and hosted by Sue Perkins, the Virgin TV British Academy Television Awards recognized “Fleabag,” “American Crime Story,” and more 2016 TV highlights. Could any of these series go on to win Emmy Awards as well? Although Netflix’s “The Crown” notched an impressive five BAFTA nominations, it failed to secure any wins. The show and its lead, Golden Globe and SAG winner Claire Foy, were bested by BBC1’s cop drama “Happy Valley,” which took home the trophies for drama series and leading actress Sarah Lancashire. And despite Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s breakthrough comedy “Fleabag” falling to BBC3’s “People Just Do Nothing” in the comedy series category, the writer-actor herself earned the BAFTA for leading actress in a comedy. Documentarian Nick Fraser won a special award,
See full article at Backstage »

‘The Crown’ Loses Out at BAFTA TV Awards; ‘Happy Valley’ Scores

‘The Crown’ Loses Out at BAFTA TV Awards; ‘Happy Valley’ Scores
Netflix’s “The Crown” lost out in all the categories it was nominated in at BAFTA’s British Academy Television Awards, which were handed out Sunday night. The Netflix show had gone into the night a favorite after scoring five nominations in four categories, the most nominations of any show this year.

The Crown” lost out to BBC crime drama “Happy Valley” in best drama category, while Claire Foy was beaten by “Happy Valley” star Sarah Lancashire in the leading actress category. John Lithgow, Jared Harris and Vanessa Kirby all lost out in supporting categories.

Foy came away empty-handed for a second consecutive year in the leading actress category, having been nominated last year for “Wolf Hall” but losing to “Doctor Foster’s” Suranne Jones. In her acceptance speech, Lancashire acknowledged Foy, a Golden Globe winner for her role as a young Queen Elizabeth II, saying: “Claire Foy, you’ve given me my best 10 hours under a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A Bafta for Nick Fraser, grandmaster of the documentary

As Storyville’s former editor is honoured with a Bafta special award, film-makers Alex Gibney and Eugene Jarecki share their experiences of working with him

Documentary editor and producer Nick Fraser will receive the Bafta special award on 14 May. Fraser was commissioning editor of the BBC’s Storyville from 1997 to 2016. Over that time the series won five Baftas and four Oscars, among other awards. He has worked on documentary films including Man on Wire, Notes on Blindness, Project Nim and India’s Daughter; in 2016, he founded documentary streaming service Yaddo. We talk to two film-makers whose careers he kickstarted.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

British Doc Veteran Nick Fraser to Receive BAFTA Special Award

Renowned documentary executive Nick Fraser is set to be honored with the special award at this Sunday's Virgin TV British Academy Television Awards.

Best known as the former commissioning editor of the BBC's doc strand Storyville — a position he held from its inception in 1997 until 2016 — Fraser helped the series win a total of five BAFTAs, four Oscars, 15 Griersons, three Peabodys and three International Emmys.

With a career spanning decades, Fraser is internationally renowned for documentaries such as BAFTA- and Academy Award-winning Man on Wire (2008); BAFTA-nominated Notes on Blindness (2016) and Project Nim (2011); India’s Daughter (2015);...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Michael Moore, Kim Longinotto, Dionne Walker projects set for Doc/Fest market

Michael Moore, Kim Longinotto, Dionne Walker projects set for Doc/Fest market
Documentary festival’s MeetMarket will host 65 projects at 2017 edition.

A Michael Moore exec-produced Orson Welles doc and Dan Gordon’s Cuban sports film are among projects to be pitched at Sheffield Doc/Fest’s MeetMarket.

The festival’s flagship pitch event, which takes place on 12-13 June, will host 65 projects selected from more than 500 submissions.

The Mark Cousins-directed Orson Welles: A Portrait Of The Artist will be seeking sales and distribution deals at the market, alongside Kim Longinotto’s Shooting The Mafia, a film about a female photographer’s war against the Mafia.

Hillsborough director Dan Gordon will return to pitch Running For The Revolution with co-producer Julie Goldman, and Bafta-nominated The Hard Stop producer Dionne Walker is to present psychological doc Invisible Woman 2.0, about a couple working the streets of Paris.

Elsewhere, the Laura Poitras exec-produced The Rashomon Effect, directed by Lyric R. Cabral, will look at the differing perspectives of eyewitnesses recalling the shooting
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Shooting Syria: documentaries from the most dangerous place on earth

Sundance 2017 audiences were impressed by films on the Syrian crisis, and Netflix’s The White Helmets is up for an Oscar. Documentarian Nick Fraser explores the art of filming under fire, and three directors tell how they did it

Wars are defined by the way they are covered. In the 1930s, it was the Leica that brought the Spanish civil war to readers, while the second world war was seen through black-and-white newsreels. After the colour TV footage of Vietnam, which introduced war to every living room, audiences experienced the illusion of real-time participation in the Balkans and the wars against Saddam Hussein via 24-hour news cycles and instant video. More recently the use of lightweight cameras has blurred the line between fighters and embedded film-makers, as Armadillo and Restrepo, two documentaries from 2010 about the war in Afghanistan, showed. But today’s Syrian wars have brought a new level of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Shooting Syria: documentaries from the most dangerous place on earth

Sundance 2017 audiences were impressed by films on the Syrian crisis, and Netflix’s The White Helmets is up for an Oscar. Documentarian Nick Fraser explores the art of filming under fire, and three directors tell how they did it

Wars are defined by the way they are covered. In the 1930s, it was the Leica that brought the Spanish civil war to readers, while the second world war was seen through black-and-white newsreels. After the colour TV footage of Vietnam, which introduced war to every living room, audiences experienced the illusion of real-time participation in the Balkans and the wars against Saddam Hussein via 24-hour news cycles and instant video. More recently the use of lightweight cameras has blurred the line between fighters and embedded film-makers, as Armadillo and Restrepo, two documentaries from 2010 about the war in Afghanistan, showed. But today’s Syrian wars have brought a new level of
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

What’s up doc: Nick Fraser’s taking on the big boys

Can fledgling documentary platform Yaddo take on the streaming site giants?

The problem facing any new streaming service is one of scale. Without a sizeable user base, a new platform can’t afford to build a decent catalogue, and without a decent catalogue it can’t attract new users. Somewhere between this rock and a hard place currently sits Yaddo, a new documentary-only streaming site launched by former BBC Storyville editor Nick Fraser.

Documentaries have exploded in popularity in recent years, thanks in large part to the commitment platforms such as Netflix and Amazon have shown to non-fiction film-making. If it’s hard to imagine Fraser’s site competing with those megaliths, Yaddo can at least hope to capitalise on their good work, and become a one-stop-shop for a burgeoning horde of documentary enthusiasts (its daft but memorable name is presumably a bid for Yahoo-style ubiquity).

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Storyville's Nick Fraser talks launching doc streaming service Yaddo

  • ScreenDaily
Storyville's Nick Fraser talks launching doc streaming service Yaddo
After leaving his postition as editor of BBC Storyville, Fraser is launching a doc streaming platform with CEO Lawrence Elman.

After two decades at the helm, documentary supremo Nick Fraser has stepped down from his position as editor of BBC Storyville.

He is continuing to executive produce and collaborate on various projects (including major new African documentary, Sierra Leone: An Artist’s Journey and Final Account, a doc based on 1000 hours of material of “old Nazis sitting in their living rooms” assembled by Luke Holland.)

He is also writing a wide-ranging book on his life in documentary for Faber. However, his current major project is the new doc streaming service Yaddo, which launched in Europe last month and is due to expand to expand to 160 territories worldwide in November. Yaddo has backing from Swedish tech company, Magine. The subscription based service will co-finance films as well as show them. Among the initial
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Imagine Dragons’ Platzman Helps Drum Up Documentary With BBC Producer

Imagine Dragons’ Platzman Helps Drum Up Documentary With BBC Producer
Multi Emmy Award-winning production company Insight Twi is teaming up with the BBC’s Nick Fraser (executive producer, “Man on Wire”) and Grammy Award-winning musician and producer Daniel Platzman of Imagine Dragons to share the uplifting story of Sierra Leone’s most celebrated playwright.

Charlie Haffner is on a mission to inspire his country by staging the most ambitious play in its history. But for an impoverished nation still recovering from the 2014 Ebola outbreak – and lacking a single permanent theater venue – every step is a struggle.

Sierra Leone: An Artist’s Journey” will follow Haffner “from writing to casting through producing the play,” according to Insight Twi’s managing director Jonathan Ossoff.

“Charlie’s story is about leadership and the power of art to transform society,” he says. “It’s about Sierra Leoneans taking matters into their own hands.”

With no guarantee that Haffner will succeed, director Clive Patterson
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sheffield Doc/Fest: Window on the World

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Sheffield Doc/Fest: Window on the World
Documentary filmmakers will descend on Sheffield in the coming days to offer a window on the past, present and virtual future. Michael Rosser reports

The 23rd Sheffield Doc/Fest (June 10-15) kicks off today and promises to be one of its most eclectic to date, with its typically diverse line-up of documentaries from around the world complemented by big name speakers and a major showcase of virtual reality content.

Its 160 feature and short films will be bookended by opening film Where To Invade Next, from Oscar-winning Us director Michael Moore, and The Seasons In Quincy: Four Portraits Of John Berger. Moore and actress Tilda Swinton, a co-director on the latter doc, will both be in Sheffield to present their films.

Moore’s film and accompanying Q&A will also be live streamed to 120 cinemas across the UK through distributor Dogwoof – the second time Doc/Fest has done this, following Pulp: A Film About Life, Death & Supermarkets
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sheffield Doc/Fest unveils line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Sheffield Doc/Fest unveils line-up
Competition titles revealed; retrospectives of Ken Loach and Chantal Akerman; speakers include HBO documentaries president Sheila Nevins and revered filmmaker Da Pennebaker. Scroll down for competition films

Sheffield Doc/Fest (June 10-15) has unveiled the programme for its 23rd edition, including 160 feature and short documentaries, an alternate realities line-up and a series of on-stage interviews and debates with major filmmakers and industry figures.

As previously announced, Michael Moore’s Where To Invade Next will open the festival with the Us documentarian in attendance at Doc/Fest for the first time since 1998.

The UK premiere and Q&A will be live streamed to 114 cinemas across the UK through distributor Dogwoof. It marks the second time Doc/Fest has streamed its opening, following Pulp: A Film About Life, Death & Supermarkets in 2014.

There are a total of 27 world premieres, 15 international, 19 European and 52 UK premieres with documentaries from 49 countries including Mexico, Cuba, China and Peru.

Competition titles
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sheffield Doc/Fest unveils 2016 line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Sheffield Doc/Fest unveils 2016 line-up
Competition titles revealed; retrospectives of Ken Loach and Chantal Akerman; speakers include HBO documentaries president Sheila Nevins and legendary filmmaker Da Pennebaker.Scroll down for competition films

Sheffield Doc/Fest (June 10-15) has unveiled the programme for its 23rd edition, including 160 feature and short documentaries, an alternate realities line-up and a series of on-stage interviews and debates with major filmmakers and industry figures.

As previously announced, Michael Moore’s Where To Invade Next will open the festival with the Us documentarian in attendance at Doc/Fest for the first time since 1998.

The UK premiere and Q&A will be live streamed to 114 cinemas across the UK through distributor Dogwoof. It marks the second time Doc/Fest has streamed its opening, following Pulp: A Film About Life, Death & Supermarkets in 2014.

There are a total of 27 world premieres, 15 international, 19 European and 52 UK premieres with documentaries from 49 countries including Mexico, Cuba, China and Peru.

Competition titles
See full article at ScreenDaily »

50 documentaries you need to see

Ten of the best nonfiction film-makers today choose their own favourites, from serial killer stories and studies in the horrors of war to meta pranks

Storyville’s Nick Fraser on the power of the documentary form

The Texan director’s feature debut, The Act of Killing (2012), and its follow-up, The Look of Silence (2014), explore the aftermath of massacres in Indonesia. Both were nominated for Oscars.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

50 documentaries you need to see

Ten of the best nonfiction film-makers today choose their own favourites, from serial killer stories and studies in the horrors of war to meta pranks

Storyville’s Nick Fraser on the power of the documentary form

The Texan director’s feature debut, The Act of Killing (2012), and its follow-up, The Look of Silence (2014), explore the aftermath of massacres in Indonesia. Both were nominated for Oscars.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘2016 Oscar-Nominated Short Films: Documentary’

Even a feature-length documentary can have trouble getting a substantive grip on its subject, which makes each of this year’s Academy Award-nominated nonfiction shorts a rewarding case study in how a tight running time can prove both help and hindrance; if anything, the necessary economy of the storytelling can enable already hard-hitting subject matter to land with an even more potent, concentrated intensity. Nonetheless, these talented filmmakers find room for a measure of tentative optimism, whether it’s in the aftermath of an attempted Muslim honor killing in “A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness”; the future of a disabled young Vietnamese artist in “Chau, Beyond the Lines”; the lingering tragedy of a mentally troubled man’s execution in “Last Day of Freedom”; or the unspeakable horror of the ebola outbreak in West Africa in “Body Team 12.” Even “Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah,” a rich
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance: Magnolia Nabs Korean Kidnapping Documentary ‘Lovers and the Despot’

Sundance: Magnolia Nabs Korean Kidnapping Documentary ‘Lovers and the Despot’
Magnolia Pictures has acquired worldwide rights to the documentary “The Lovers and the Despot,” following its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

The film, directed by Rob Cannan and Ross Adams, centers on the 1978 kidnappings of South Korean director Shin Sang-ok and actress Choi Eun-hee by operatives of the late North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il, a film fanatic. It will have its European premiere next month in the Panorama section of the Berlin Film Festival.

Magnolia is targeting a 2016 theatrical release.

After a string of successful films, Choi was kidnapped by North Korean agents and taken to meet Kim Jong-il. Shin, who had recently divorced Choi, went searching for her and was also kidnapped.

Following five years of imprisonment, the couple was reunited by Kim, who declared them his personal filmmakers. Choi and Shin produced 17 feature films for the dictator and escaped in 1986 in Vienna by requesting political asylum at the United States embassy.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Amy,’ ‘Listen to Me Marlon’ Among Ida Documentary Awards Nominees

‘Amy,’ ‘Listen to Me Marlon’ Among Ida Documentary Awards Nominees
The International Documentary Association (Ida) has announced nominations and creative recognition awards for the 31st annual Ida Documentary Awards to be held on Dec. 5.

The best feature nominees are: Asif Kapadia’s “Amy,” an emotional study of life of singer Amy Winehouse, “Amy”; “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of a Revolution,” Stanley Nelson’s account of the rise and fall of the Black Panther party; Stevan Riley’s “Listen to Me Marlon,” which uses hundreds of hours of Marlon Brando’s personal audio recordings to paint a portrait of the legend; Joshua Oppenheimer’s “The Look of Silence,” another sober look back at the Indonesian anti-communist purge of 1965 and 1966; Chad Garcia’s “The Russian Woodpecker,” about the investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl disaster; and Liz Garbus’ “What Happened, Miss Simone?,” a portrait of singer Nina Simone.

The Russian Woodpecker” won cinematography honors while “Listen to Me Marlon” was recognized for its writing.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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