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Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (3) | Trade Mark (3) | Trivia (11) | Personal Quotes (14)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 22 February 1928Edmonton, London, England, UK
Birth NameBruce Joseph Forsyth-Johnson
Nickname Brucie
Height 5' 11¾" (1.82 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Bruce Forsyth was born on February 22, 1928 in Edmonton, London, England as Bruce Joseph Forsyth-Johnson. He is a writer and actor, known for Strictly Come Dancing (2004), Val Parnell's Sunday Night at the London Palladium (1955) and Play Your Cards Right (1980). He has been married to Wilnelia Merced since 1983. They have one child. He was previously married to Anthea Redfern and Penny Calvert.

Spouse (3)

Wilnelia Merced (1983 - present) (1 child)
Anthea Redfern (1973 - 1979) (divorced) (2 children)
Penny Calvert (1953 - 1973) (divorced) (3 children)

Trade Mark (3)

Creates catchphrases for each of his many TV game-shows. The most famous include "Nice to see you, To see you Nice", "Give Us a Twirl", "Good Game, Good Game" and "Didn't they Do Well".
Has a very large chin
Crouching figure with fist raised to chin seen in silhouette at the beginning of his shows.

Trivia (11)

He has one son, Jonathan Joseph, with third wife Wilnelia Merced, two daughters Charlotte Forsyth and Louisa Forsyth with second wife Anthea Redfern and three daughters Debbie Forsyth, Julie Forsyth and Laura Forsyth with first wife Penny Calvert.
He was awarded the OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) in the 1998 Queen's Honours List for his services to entertainment.
He is referenced in the song "You're in a Bad Way" by Saint Etienne.
He first appeared on television in 1938.
He has made some vocal records.
He was awarded the C.B.E.(Commander of the Order of the British Empire) in the 2006 New Year's Honours List for his services to entertainment.
He is regarded as one of the last great variety entertainers, as he could act, sing, play piano, ukulele and accordion, dance and tell jokes.
Father-in-law of Dominic Grant.
Served as a corporal in the Royal Air Force.
He was awarded the Knight Bachelor of the Order of the British Empire in the 2011 Queen's Birthday Honours List for his services to Entertainment and to Charity.
Surrey, England [June 2011]

Personal Quotes (14)

[Speaking in November 2004]: I'm not 77 until February and every month to me is vital.
I do a work-out every morning, half-an-hour, yoga and stretches, always before breakfast otherwise I don't feel like it.
I'd never done a show where I'd sat down behind a desk. I always call myself a 'head-to-toe' performer, I move around.
I want to be famous and buy my mum a fur coat.
I don't know why they call it light entertainment though. Were Morecambe (Eric Morecambe) and Wise (Ernie Wise) light entertainment? The Two Ronnies (1971)? I think it was very heavy. It got millions and millions of viewers; it was heavy entertainment, giving the general public what they wanted. I've never liked the idea of light entertainment; I've never understood it and I never will.
I am not doddery... doddery I am not!
When I was in the business as a young performer, it was a recognised fact that when you got to 60 you were out, because there'd be a new crop of comics coming up all the time, every 10 years or so.
Strictly Come Dancing (2004) is the most difficult show I've ever done. Even as a child of nine or 10 when I was doing competitions, I always had an audience in front of me that I could bounce off. All I've got in front of me here is a camera - so it is difficult to do a Bruce Forsyth performance at times.
Val Parnell of Sunday Night at the Palladium said to me when I was very worried after doing six weeks that I was running out of material, 'Don't worry you've got another 33, 34 shows - do them, forget them, do next week, forget it'. And that's how I've regarded television ever since - you do it, good or bad, you forget it.
Even though I'm 81, when I walk on to a studio floor, I feel 30. People have been asking if I'm going to retire for the last 10 or 15 years. It's getting to be an old question - I'm nearly as old as the question! I'll know when I've had enough and probably the audience will know when I've had enough as well. When it happens, I'm ready for it. I still love show business, I still love to get out there.
It's a good thing to cap the salaries and I think it should have probably been done a long time ago. We've always been overpaid, but it's the demand. It's like theatres, you'll only command a high salary if you put bums on seats. So if you are in that position, that does give you a status of asking for big money. But everybody's taken pay cuts now, I think it's a very good thing. (Speaking in 2009)
I don't want to grow old gracefully. I want to put up a bit of a fight. [8 July 2010]
[on being awarded Knighthood in June 2011]: So happy and so relieved in a way. When I got the CBE there'd been speculation every year and I think there's been too much talk about it, so I'm thrilled at last it has happened. I feel very proud that my career hasn't been in vain. I just love getting out there and performing and this is a reward that I never expected and hope I'm worthy of. We were doubtful because it's been going on so long, the speculation, we thought it might be a hoax so we did check all the way down the line that it was real.
[on Jimmy Savile] I never liked him. I can honestly say that. There was something about him that was difficult to like. It wasn't because he was so brash about everything - it wasn't that. He had this manner that you thought, 'What is behind this man?' Now we know what was behind it all - which is terrible to find out. I feel sorry for his family and the charity people that put so much trust in him. But of course he was making so much money. The whole thing is too dreadful. It is unbelievably bad. He got into hospital and molested people. That is far worse than being in the BBC. It is a pity he can't be brought to the justice system for all that has happened.

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