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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 1999 | 1996

1-20 of 57 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Page To Screen: Adapting Forrest Gump turned a caustic satire into a sentimental romance

21 September 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

In Page To Screen, we compare a movie to the book that spawned it. The analysis goes into deep detail about specific plot points—in other words, you’ve been warned.

Is there a point where a film adaptation, by deviating too much from its source material, ceases to be an adaptation?

Consider The Curious Case Of Benjamin Button, the film of which retains only the basic conceit of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s original short story—a man who is born old and ages backwards. Everything else, including the vast majority of characters and incidents, are original to the screenplay, making it hard to view it as an adaptation in anything other than a technical way. (Writer Eric Roth was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay for it, while Dustin Lance Black won Best Original Screenplay for Milk, demonstrating the confusing delineation the Oscars makes between being bound by historical record »

- Ryan Vlastelica

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Inside Baz Luhrmann’s ‘The Get Down,’ The Best $120 Million Netflix Ever Spent

11 August 2016 9:01 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Baz Luhrmann has always had ambition. From his sweeping Cannes debut “Strictly Ballroom” to his wholly reimagined take on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” he’s always been known for an uncompromising vision.

And whether you’re taken aback by Luhrmann’s manic, melodic, cinematic constructions or addicted to his propulsive filmmaking style, it should come as no surprise that his first foray into serialized storytelling is as wild as it is ambitious.

Labeled “among the most expensive [TV series] in history” by Variety’s Cynthia Littleton (and only pseudo-refuted by Luhrmann in THR’s follow-up story), “The Get Down” was, indeed, a lengthy production featuring many moving pieces, a non-traditional episodic structure and a young, largely untested cast. But it was not a project Luhrmann entered into lightly — nor were its challenges driven by the wrong reasons. Luhrmann was steering the ship the whole way, making decisions based on »

- Ben Travers

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Inside Baz Luhrmann’s ‘The Get Down,’ The Best $120 Million Netflix Ever Spent

11 August 2016 9:01 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Baz Luhrmann has always had ambition. From his sweeping Cannes debut “Strictly Ballroom” to his wholly reimagined take on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” he’s always been known for an uncompromising vision.

And whether you’re taken aback by Luhrmann’s manic, melodic, cinematic constructions or addicted to his propulsive filmmaking style, it should come as no surprise that his first foray into serialized storytelling is as wild as it is ambitious.

Labeled “among the most expensive [TV series] in history” by Variety’s Cynthia Littleton (and only pseudo-refuted by Luhrmann in THR’s follow-up story), “The Get Down” was, indeed, a lengthy production featuring many moving pieces, a non-traditional episodic structure and a young, largely untested cast. But it was not a project Luhrmann entered into lightly — nor were its challenges driven by the wrong reasons. Luhrmann was steering the ship the whole way, making decisions based on »

- Ben Travers

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Indignation Movie Review

1 August 2016 9:05 PM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Indignation     Roadside Attractions/ Summit Entertainment Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B+ Director:  James Schamus Written by: James Schamus, based on Philip Roth’s novel of the same name Cast: Logan Lerman, Sarah Gadon, Tracy Letts, Linda Edmond, Danny Burstein Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 7/7/16 Opens: July 29, 2016 If nobody can surpass F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ability to conjure up the 1920s in America, ditto for Woody Allen for the 1930s, then can anyone capture the spirit of the early 1950s better than Philip Roth?  The great novelist (30 books) is now retired, but happily movies continue to be adapted from his works, such as “The Human Stain,” Goodbye  [ Read More ]

The post Indignation Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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Amazon Picks Up "The Last Tycoon" To Series

27 July 2016 8:09 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Amazon has announced that they have picked up their 1930s Hollywood studio drama "The Last Tycoon" to series.

Matt Bomer stars as Monroe Stahr, Hollywood's first high-profile studio executive as he climbs to the height of power pitting him against his mentor and the imposing but charming current studio head Pat Brady (Kelsey Grammer). Rosemarie DeWitt and Lily Collins co-star.

Sony Pictures TV and TriStar TV are producing the series which is based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's final unfinished novel and is inspired by the life of film moguls Irving Thalberg and Louis B. Mayer. "Shattered Glass" scribe Billy Ray serves as showrunner alongside Chris Keyser.

Source: TV Line »

- Garth Franklin

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The Last Tycoon: Amazon Orders Matt Bomer, Kelsey Grammer Series

27 July 2016 6:32 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Amazon is going Hollywood. Deadline reports the streaming service has given a series order to The Last Tycoon.Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's final, unfinished novel, the drama follows the complicated relationship between talented Hollywood movie producer Monroe Stahr and intimidating studio head Pat Brady. The story is based on real-life figures Irving Thalberg and Louis B. Mayer.Read More… »

- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Matt Bomer's The Last Tycoon Gets Series Order at Amazon

27 July 2016 12:43 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

You have not seen the last of The Last Tycoon.

Amazon has ordered the Matt Bomer-fronted pilot to series, our sister site Deadline reports, some six weeks after the pilot was offered for consumer review on the streaming site.

RelatedKevin Smith’s Buckaroo Banzai Adaptation Eyed by Amazon

A Great Depression-era drama adapted from the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, The Last Tycoon stars Bomer (White Collar) as a Hollywood golden boy battling his father figure and boss (played by four-time Emmy winner Kelsey Grammer) for the soul of their studio; Lily Collins (The Blind Side) co-stars.

RelatedThe Tick, »

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'The Last Tycoon' Ordered to Series at Amazon

27 July 2016 12:22 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Amazon is moving forward with The Last Tycoon. The streaming service has picked up the drama starring Matt Bomer and Kelsey Grammer to series, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed. Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s final unfinished novel, The Last Tycoon is inspired by the life of film mogul Irving Thalberg. The series revolves around Monroe Stahr (Bomer, Magic Mike, American Horror Story), Hollywood’s first high-profile studio executive in the 1930s as he climbs to the height of power pitting him against his mentor and current head of the studio, the brawny, imposing, charming and vain Pat Brady (Grammer). Brady's character

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- Lesley Goldberg

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Why The ‘Ghostbusters’ Backlash Is A Sexist Control Issue

14 July 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When I was 11, I saw “Ghostbusters.” I thought it was funny.

Since the “Ghostbusters” reboot was announced, we’ve learned that, for a great many people, their emotional relationship with the original “Ghostbusters” is substantially more fraught. There were those who thrilled to the idea that, after 20-plus years of rumors and false starts, we’d finally get more “Ghostbusters.” And, there were those who objected to reviving the franchise, arguing that any attempt to recapture the original glory was doomed to fail.

Then there are the Ghostbros, the noisiest if not most numerous contingent, for whom reviving the franchise with women in the leading roles is the ultimate desecration. It would have been one thing to pass the torch, as Ivan Reitman had originally planned, with a sequel in which the classic quartet trained a newer, spryer group in the finer points of busting ghosts. But effectively redoing the »

- Sam Adams

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Francis Ford Coppola Relaunches Zoetrope.Com Site for Short Films

12 July 2016 6:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola has relaunched his 19-year-old virtual studio Zoetrope.com, adding a showcase for short films.

The website, which touts itself as setting the precedent for a new era of crowd-sourcing and writing workshops, includes acting resumes, photography, song writing, short films, stories, novels, scripts, short flash fiction, poetry, music and photos.

The new short films section is designed to offer screenwriters, directors and producers peer feedback. Zoetrope.com requires that for every story a member submits, they are required to review five other works, so each person gets exposed to other writing which provides growing opportunities in addition to receiving feedback.

“When I was a kid I remember looking in the locked gates of a movie studio which was across the street from the Junior High School I was attending,” Coppola said in a statement. “I was wishing that I could get in and see what these mythical movie studios were. »

- Dave McNary

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Michael Shannon Speaks Out Against Indie Actors Working for Free

10 July 2016 9:55 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Michael Shannon has proven especially adept at balancing high-profile roles with low-key passion projects, with movies like “Man of Steel” and “Midnight Special” introducing his nonpareil screen presence to wider audiences than the likes of “99 Homes” and “My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done?” The latter category often comes with significantly smaller paydays, of course, and Shannon spoke out yesterday about actors taking pay cuts for appearing in prestige fare. “I’ve come to the point where I’m gonna start putting my foot down,” he said to Variety from the Karlovy Vary Film Festival.

Read More: Michael Shannon Performs Pixies’ ‘Here Comes Your Man’ On Spike’s ‘Lip Sync Battle’—Watch

Shannon is in the Czech Republic with Joshua Marston’s “Complete Unknown,” which he called “basically like a volunteer effort. That why you gotta take advantage of these film festivals. This is kind of your reward for making the movie. »

- Michael Nordine

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5 Amazon Studios Shows You Should Check Out

30 June 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Whether you already love Amazon Studio’s award-winning “Transparent,” “Mozart in the Jungle,” and “Bosch,” or you’re looking for new series to add to your binge-watching arsenal, the streaming service is stepping up their game to provide you quality television. Two drama pilots are now available to watch as part of Amazon’s new pilot season: “The Last Tycoon,” Billy Ray and Christopher Keyser’s adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s final masterpiece, starring Matt Bomer and Kelsey Grammer as warring Hollywood studio heads; and “The Interestings,” an adaptation of Meg Wolitzer’s coming-of-age novel starring Lauren Ambrose. Below are some other upcoming Amazon series to keep on your radar. The premiere dates may not be announced, but Amazon Prime members can still watch each series’ first episode. Read: “8 Questions With ‘Last Tycoon’ Star Matt Bomer” “Z: The Beginning of EverythingChristina Ricci is back on the small screen »

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[Review] The Phenom

22 June 2016 11:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

I admittedly didn’t think too much on The Phenom after watching its trailer. There was a good cast, its look behind the curtain of fame seemed intriguing, and there’d probably be some darkly honest depictions of sports abuse at the hands of over-zealous parents. But then I saw who the writer/director was and suddenly all I could do was think. Noah Buschel is the man behind a wonderful little character piece from a few years back called Sparrows Dance and seeing his name as the creator of this baseball movie had me scratching my head. It looked run-of-the-mill: prodigy gets the “yips” and must face his past to overcome. It didn’t seem like something the author of Sparrows Dance would tackle. And to a point I was right.

The Phenom isn’t about baseball. Sure we see a few pitches — mostly the wild ones that derailed »

- Jared Mobarak

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Movie Review: Genius

21 June 2016 11:21 AM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

The film Genius was not genius for me. It contained a wonderful cast and had enormous potential, but fell flat completely. I’m getting drowsy just thinking back on it. However, keep in mind that reviewing film is subjective. I did not enjoy Genius, which by no means infers that someone else might not enjoy it. So, in fairness, let me expound on what you can expect and you can make your own decision.

This story is concerned with the relationship between novelist Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law) and editor Max Perkins (Colin Firth), noteworthy for his publishing the works of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The film begins with Wolfe waiting to see if his manuscript will be accepted for publication by Scribner’s Sons Publishing. Thomas, an eccentric over-expressive writer, fully believes he will be rejected as he has been time and time again. To his surprise, Perkins »

- Betsy Russo

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Amazon 2016 Pilots: ‘The Interestings’ and ‘The Last Tycoon,’ Reviewed

17 June 2016 1:01 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The Last Tycoon

In the year 2016, it’s no secret that as glamorous as old Hollywood seemed on the surface, the truth was far less wholesome. With that in mind, “The Last Tycoon,” written and directed by Billy Ray (the under-appreciated talent behind such films as “Shattered Glass,” adapting a famously unfinished roman a clef by F. Scott Fitzgerald) might seem a bit rote, but it’s got an awful lot going for it.

Matt Bomer stars as Monroe Stahr, the idealistic production head of a motion picture studio who’s at odds with studio boss Pat Brady (Kelsey Grammer) while trying to get his dream picture made in the political and social climate of the 1930s. (Why yes, the subject of what’s happening in Germany does come up.) Monroe, we learn right away, is mourning the loss of his movie star wife even as he bounds around the studio, »

- Ben Travers and Liz Shannon Miller

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Amazon 2016 Pilots: ‘The Interestings’ and ‘The Last Tycoon,’ Reviewed

17 June 2016 1:01 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Last Tycoon

In the year 2016, it’s no secret that as glamorous as old Hollywood seemed on the surface, the truth was far less wholesome. With that in mind, “The Last Tycoon,” written and directed by Billy Ray (the under-appreciated talent behind such films as “Shattered Glass,” adapting a famously unfinished roman a clef by F. Scott Fitzgerald) might seem a bit rote, but it’s got an awful lot going for it.

Matt Bomer stars as Monroe Stahr, the idealistic production head of a motion picture studio who’s at odds with studio boss Pat Brady (Kelsey Grammer) while trying to get his dream picture made in the political and social climate of the 1930s. (Why yes, the subject of what’s happening in Germany does come up.) Monroe, we learn right away, is mourning the loss of his movie star wife even as he bounds around the studio, »

- Ben Travers and Liz Shannon Miller

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Genius – Review

17 June 2016 8:29 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Sometimes words are just words. Other times a strong voice can bring written words to life. That is the goal of a writer after all. In Genius, Max Perkins (played by Colin Firth) is a man who helps bring these words to life, albeit, sometimes in a more condensed or cohesive form. He’s an editor for Charles Scribner’s Sons in New York in 1929.  Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law) is a boisterous struggling writer when Perkins barges into Perkins’ office with the hope to be the next classic writer published by the company, following in the footsteps of Hemingway and Fitzgerald, respectively. The ups and downs of this creative partnership push both of these men to their limits, as well as that of their wives (Nicole Kidman and Laura Linney).

When reading great works of literature, it’s easy to forget the blood, sweat, and tears that go into such an undertaking. »

- Michael Haffner

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Tom Hiddleston Seems to Have Swept Taylor Swift Off Her Feet: Further Proof That He's the Real-Life James Bond

16 June 2016 | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Hiddleston. Tom Hiddleston. For those of you who didn't fall for his odd allure as Loki in Thor and The Avengers, or didn't crush on him as F. Scott Fitzgerald in Midnight in Paris, or weren't uncomfortably drawn to him in Crimson Peak—or heaven forbid, were not completely convinced that he could play 007 after watching him spy, lie, save the day and bed the girl(s) in The Night Manager—take note. This is Taylor Swift's new man (or at least her new sitting-on-a-rock-and-kissing buddy), and no matter what he does next, or how long it lasts... He's in the pantheon. Songs will be written about him. And while a quick poll of our office will have you wondering if it's actually »

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Review: Genius

14 June 2016 11:40 PM, PDT | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Plot: The story of famed literary editor Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth) and his relationship with the brilliant, tortured Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law). Review: For those not in the know, Maxwell Perkins was arguably the most important literary editor of the twentieth century, having discovered Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald among others. Famous for his tact in helping authors realize their full potential, in... Read More »

- Chris Bumbray

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Watch Nicole Kidman Go Head-to-Head with Colin Firth in Exclusive Clip from Genius

9 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In this exclusive clip from upcoming biographical drama Genius, you can cut the tension with a butter knife. The dinnertime scene begins with Look Homeward, Angel author Thomas Wolfe, played by Jude Law, describing the major role costume designer Aline Bernstein (Nicole Kidman) has played in the production of his latest novel. Bernstein shakes off the praise, turning instead to Maxwell Perkins (Colin Firth), the famous editor of authors like Wolfe, Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. "Tom speaks of your contribution with such passion," Bernstein tells Perkins, reminding Wolfe that Perkins "is the genius who made all of your dreams come true. »

- Andrea Park, @scandreapark

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 1999 | 1996

1-20 of 57 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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