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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


This Is England ’90 starts shooting this weekend

5 September 2014 3:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Back in 2006 up and coming Uttoxeter-born director Shane Meadows (Dead Mans Shoes) began working on a low-budget British movie centring around the skinhead subculture in the aftermath of the Falklands War in the early 80’s. Based on his own childhood experiences during the time, the movie struck a delicate and poignant chord in the UK and helped launch the careers of young British actors including Vicky McClure (Line Of Duty, Broadchurch), Thomas Turgoose (Eden Lake), Joe Gilgun (Pride) and Jack O’Connell (Starred Up). It was hailed by many critics as one of the best British movies of the decade and in 2008 it won the Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film at the BAFTAs. It spawned two very successful TV miniseries – This Is England ’86 and This Is England ’88 – with a third instalment on the horizon.

After almost three years of waiting it now looks like This Is England ’90 finally has it’s shooting date. »

- Gavin Logan

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This Is England '90 to start filming in September

29 August 2014 6:39 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

This Is England '90 is to start filming next month.

The final instalment in Shane Meadows's dramatic saga will shoot in and around Sheffield from September.

The series' return was confirmed via an eBay auction, offering the chance to appear as an extra in support of the Teenage Cancer Trust.

At the time of writing the auction - which ends later today (August 29) - has reached a top bid of £2,500.

Meadows confirmed to Digital Spy last year that This Is England '90 would be the last entry in the series.

Originating with the film This Is England in 2006, Meadows's story - which follows a gang of youths in the North - moved to television for the acclaimed series This Is England '86 (2010) and This Is England '88 (2011).

Jack O'Connell may star in This Is England '90: 'Pukey still exists'

This Is England '90 ending is "very sad", says »

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Daily | Venice 2014 | Guy Myhill’s The Goob

28 August 2014 6:08 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Guy Myhill's debut feature, The Goob, premiering at Venice Days, "ostensibly borrows heavily from the Andrea Arnold school of contemporary working class miserablism," notes Adam Woodward at Little White Lies. "Stylistically and tonally, however, it blends the codeine reverie of Harmony Korine's Gummo with the cold-shower realism of early Ken Loach, although perhaps the film it best evokes is Shane Meadows's A Room for Romeo Brass. This is a tremendously assured portrait of an underprivileged if sporadically joy-filled childhood." And we've got more reviews and clips. » - David Hudson »

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Simon Pegg interview: Hector, British film, blockbusters

13 August 2014 6:54 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Pegg tries to find the secret to happiness in his latest film. He chats to us about its making, British cinema and more...

Simon Pegg is back in cinemas this week, in Peter Chelsom's Hector And The Search For Happiness. Ahead of that, the man himself sat down with us for a chat, that led to us - genuinely - being locked in a hotel room together for a minute or two.

It was not helped by us holding a packet of Love Hearts at the time. It's probably best you don't ask.

Anyway, we kept our professional composure, and this is what happened...

Given what a globetrotting movie this one is, how are your passport stamps looking?

It's ridiculously stamped now!

Did you film any of it in Liam Neeson's fake plane from Non-Stop? That would have made it easier.

We were working out how long »

- ryanlambie

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David Kosse named Film4 boss

4 August 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Universal Pictures exec to replace Tessa Ross in November.

David Kosse has been named the new head of Film4, ending months of industry speculation over the appointment.

The widely-respected production and distribution executive will take up the position from November 1 after a decade at studio Universal, most recently as president of international.

He takes over from outgoing boss Tessa Ross, who leaves to become chief executive of the National Theatre in the autumn.

As director of Film4 Kosse will oversee the development, financing and green-lighting of all feature films, and support for the production and distribution of all Film4-backed releases both in the UK and internationally. 

Channel 4 chief executive David Abraham told ScreenDaily that Kosse “really stood out” among candidates, with the decision crystalizing over the last month.

“He has built impeccable creative relationships with British and international talent and is also steeped in knowledge and experience of changing distribution models in film,” Abraham added in »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Blu-ray Review: 'Jules et Jim' & 'Shoot the Pianist'

28 July 2014 7:53 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★French critic and auteur François Truffaut's tone and style have been both successfully and unsuccessfully mined by numerous directors over the years, including the likes of Wes Anderson, Richard Ayoade and Shane Meadows. Never as knowingly hip and revolutionary as others, his cinema belongs to Renoir and Vigo, and is carried on by that doomed depressive Leos Carax. Truffaut claimed that if he walked into a casino, his first instinct would be to master the rules. Godard's first instinct, Truffaut added, would be to invent new ones. With his second and third films, Shoot the Pianist (1960) and Jules et Jim (1962) - both rereleased this week - we see a true master at work.

»

- CineVue UK

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Brotherly love: 5 must-see movies that show blood is thicker than water

27 June 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Mistaken for Strangers, the documentary about The National frontman Matt Berninger and his wayward filmmaker brother Tom, arrives in UK cinemas today (June 27), and is a reminder that siblings can sometimes make for great cinema.

Whether it's the constant squabbling of Will Ferrell and John C Reilly in Step Brothers, the epic Corleone rivalry in The Godfather or Marlon Brando and Rod Steiger in On the Waterfront, brothers can make for highly-charged drama.

The National: Matt, Tom Berninger on their rock doc Mistaken for Strangers

The National to release "huge bonus version" of Mistaken for Strangers doc

Digital Spy takes a look back at 5 movies about brothers - from entirely different genres - that are essential viewing for film fans.

Dead Ringers (1988)

A typically ambitious psychological thriller from David Cronenberg, Dead Ringers saw Jeremy Irons take on the role of Beverly and Elliot Mantle, identical twin brothers who work as »

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Robert Pattinson, Guy Pearce & David Michôd Introduce us to the world of The Rover in our Exclusive Video

20 June 2014 2:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

This year’s Cannes film festival played host to the premiere of David Michôd’s bleak follow up to his fearsome 2010 film Animal Kingdom. Today we have an exclusive introduction to the dark near-future world of The Rover.

Michôd’s latest film takes place ten years after a global collapse with cultures and societies shifting and realigning.  Pearce’s downtroddden farmer finds himself on a dangerous journey through the unforgiving landscape following a violent robbery.

This short peek behind the scenes introduces us to the main players in this dystopian funk, along with Messrs. Pearce and Pattinson we have Susan Prior, Producer David Linde and Cinematographer Natasha Braier to talk us through own visions of Michôd’s strange new world.

Take a look below,

Braier’s work in particular is shown off beautifully here and she has done some fine work with the likes of Shane Meadows and Lynne Ramsay, »

- Jon Lyus

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Robert Pattinson, Guy Pearce & David Michôd Introduce us to the world of The Rover in our Exclusive Video

20 June 2014 2:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

This year’s Cannes film festival played host to the premiere of David Michôd’s bleak follow up to his fearsome 2010 film Animal Kingdom. Today we have an exclusive introduction to the dark near-future world of The Rover.

Michôd’s latest film takes place ten years after a global collapse with cultures and societies shifting and realigning.  Pearce’s downtroddden farmer finds himself on a dangerous journey through the unforgiving landscape following a violent robbery.

This short peek behind the scenes introduces us to the main players in this dystopian funk, along with Messrs. Pearce and Pattinson we have Susan Prior, Producer David Linde and Cinematographer Natasha Braier to talk us through own visions of Michôd’s strange new world.

Take a look below,

Braier’s work in particular is shown off beautifully here and she has done some fine work with the likes of Shane Meadows and Lynne Ramsay, »

- Jon Lyus

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Common People – Documenting the Fans in Pulp: A Film About Life, Death and Supermarkets

6 June 2014 3:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

“This band are the reason that I’ve never worn a tie.” This quote is one of the many superb fan quotes from Shane Meadows’ excellent documentary Made of Stone. Released last year, the film followed the comeback of legendary band The Stone Roses. The documentary was outstanding, but what made it exceptional were the scenes that explored the reaction of the band’s fans, many of whom had never expected to ever see a reunion. Ranging from unashamed joy to downright hysteria (even Meadows himself could barely keep it together when hearing the news), each of the fans discussed what exactly the band and their music had meant to them. Through listening to the fans, Meadows gains a true understanding of the way in which music can form the identity of the common man, and how music can allow a person to break out of the comfort of their »

- Nia Childs

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Pulp: a Film about Life, Death & Supermarkets review: A life in the day

2 June 2014 9:47 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director: Florian Habicht; Starring: Jarvis Cocker, Mark Webber, Candida Doyle, Nick Banks, Steve Mackey and the people of Sheffield; Running time: 90 mins; Certificate: 12A

Forming in 1978 and releasing their first album It in 1983, Pulp became the slowest-burning overnight success in history when the double-whammy of His 'n' Hers and Different Class made them pop superstars in 1994/95.

But rather than trudge us through the Fire to the Promised Island, director Florian Habicht instead picks - more or less - a single day in the Pulp story. December, 8, 2012 - the band's homecoming show after their reunion the year before.

Most of the film is made up of chats (it'd be over-formalising them to call them interviews) with the band, their fans, and the people of Sheffield. By narrowing his film's focus, Habicht has made a tender, charming life in the day of a unique band in British pop.

From lads working the »

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Pulp: A Film About Life, Death and Supermarkets Review

2 June 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Florian Habicht’s nostalgia-infused documentary about Pulp; one of the pioneers of the Britpop phenomena, opens somewhat predictably with their biggest single Common People. On first impressions, such a selection seems too obvious, as though appealing to a mainstream audience rather than the “proper” fans. However eventually it makes perfect sense, as the song is contextually perfect in relation to this film, as that’s what this is truly all about; the common people.

Gaining most of their success in the mid-90s, particularly with their release of the classic album Different Class in ’95, Pulp, led by the enigmatic frontman Jarvis Cocker, have since returned to the stage, reuniting to tour once again. This documentary chronicles the band’s decision to get back together, in the build up to their final show – in their hometown of Sheffield.

Sheffield plays a huge part in this title, as Habicht follows the city’s inhabitants voyeuristically, »

- Stefan Pape

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Hyena to open Edinburgh

12 May 2014 3:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Gerard Johnson’s follow-up to Tony to receive world premiere as opening film; contenders for Michael Powell Award also revealed, including six world premieres.

The Edinburgh International Film Festival (Eiff) has revealed that corrupt cop drama Hyena will open the 68th edition of the festival on June 18.

The film reunites director Gerard Johnson with Peter Ferdinando, who played the lead in his debut feature Tony which received its world premiere at Eiff in 2009.

Producers include Stephen Woolley (Made in Dagenham, The Crying Game, Mona Lisa), Elizabeth Karlsen (Great Expectations, Ladies in Lavender) and Joanna Laurie. Hyena was developed by Film4. Sam Lavender and Katherine Butler exec produced the film for Film4 which was co-financed by Film4, BFI, Ingenious and Lipsync and will be released by Metrodome in the UK and distributed internationally by Independent.

Set in London, Hyena revolves around corrupt police officer Michael Logan (Ferdinando) who has to deal with an influx of ruthless Albanian gangsters »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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After Bob Hoskins, it's curtains for working-class actors these days | Barbara Ellen

3 May 2014 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Bob Hoskins had a rich and varied career that would not happen now as upper-class men get all the good parts

Rip, Bob Hoskins extraordinary actor and, by all accounts, decent cove. In a wider sense, Hoskins's death raises fresh questions about his legacy as a working-class actor in that he actually got to leave a legacy, in the form of a canon of remarkable and (crucially) varied work spanning 40 years. Jump forward a few decades and how many British working-class actors will have had such chances?

When people comment along the lines that we will never see Hoskins's like again, they are rightly referring to his acting, but it could just as easily be a statement about his class. Outside designated zones such as soap-land, or whatever Shane Meadows, Noel Clarke or Paul Abbott might be doing, working-class actors are becoming practically invisible, the ghosts of the industry, rarely »

- Barbara Ellen

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Helen Mirren on Bob Hoskins: 'A spectacular firework just as it takes off'

30 April 2014 9:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Stephen Woolley, Shane Meadows and Helen Mirren pay tribute to actor Bob Hoskins, who has died aged 71

Bob was a great actor and an even greater man. Funny, loyal, instinctive, hard-working, with that inimitable energy that seemed like a spectacular firework rocket just as it takes off. When I worked with him on The Long Good Friday he was supportive and not egotistical. He was never sexist, when many around at that time were. I had the honour of watching the creation of one of the most memorable characters in British film.

Continue reading »

- Shane Meadows, Helen Mirren and Stephen Woolley

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Bob Hoskins: forget Mona Lisa, Felicia's Journey was his masterpiece | Peter Bradshaw

30 April 2014 9:33 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bob Hoskins' appeal lay in a chirpiness forever on the edge of explosion. Yet his most powerful hour came playing a man with genuinely unsettling intent beneath that cuddly exterior

 Helen Mirren, Shane Meadows and Stephen Woolley share their memories of Hoskins

Bob Hoskins was such a strong presence on screen: wiry, coiled, a low centre of gravity. For me, he always no matter how old he got looked like a recently retired boxer, the kind who might well instantly return to fisticuffs if provoked, but also like a man who could suddenly burst out laughing at a joke he liked, or into tears at a sentimental song. He was more muscle than fat, more heart than most. And it looked like someone might have broken that heart.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Bob Hoskins, one of Britain's best-loved actors, dies aged 71

30 April 2014 8:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Bob Hoskins, the British actor who starred in The Long Good Friday, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and many more, has died aged 71

 Helen Mirren, Shane Meadows and Stephen Woolley share their memories of Hoskins

 Bob Hoskins: a career in pictures

 Bob Hoskins: Xan Brooks pays tribute

Bob Hoskins obituary

Bob Hoskins: a career in clips

Patrick Barkham: 'He was unforgettable'

The actor Bob Hoskins has died aged 71. His agent said that he died on Tuesday, surrounded by his family, suffering from pneumonia. He retired in 2012 following a diagnosis with Parkinson's disease in the autumn of 2011.

One of Britain's best-loved actors, Hoskins was known for his gruff bonhomie, and career that spanned more than 30 years. He first found fame on the small screen in Dennis Potter's Pennies from Heaven, and then in cinemas as a London gangster-turned-businessman in The Long Good Friday (1980).

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- Catherine Shoard

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Bob Hoskins: 8 great movie roles - Hook, Roger Rabbit, Mermaids

30 April 2014 7:02 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Bob Hoskins, the legendary British actor whose career spanned more than 40 years, has died at the age of 71. Hoskins passed away today (April 30) after contracting pneumonia. He announced his retirement from acting in 2012 following a Parkinson's diagnosis.

Bob Hoskins dies, aged 71: Tributes pour in for Long Good Friday star

Hoskins leaves behind an eclectic selection of film roles, having worked with filmmakers ranging from Steven Spielberg to Stephen Frears. Here are eight of his more memorable big screen roles...

The Long Good Friday (1980)

Probably the greatest British gangster film ever made, Hoskins delivered an explosive turn as Harold Shand, a criminal looking to refashion himself as a legit businessman. John McKenzie's film has stood the test of time exceptionally well, having contemporary resonance in Shand's plans to rejuvenate the London Docklands to make way for the Olympic Games.

Mona Lisa (1986)

This Neil Jordan drama was the film that »

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Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins passes away at 71

30 April 2014 5:57 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

I'm hugely saddened to report that Oscar-nominated British actor Bob Hoskins -- the quintessential Cockney gent of latter-day cinema -- has passed away. Aged 71, he died in hospital following a bout of pneumonia. His wife, Linda, and four children issued a statement clarifying that the Londoner "died peacefully at hospital last night surrounded by family," and thanked well-wishers for their "messages of love and support." Hoskins' health had been declining for some time: he retired  from acting in 2012 after being diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. His last screen role was in "Snow White and the Huntsman." After supporting roles in such films as "Zulu Dawn" and a BAFTA-nominated turn in Dennis Potter's TV landmark "Pennies From Heaven," Hoskins' film breakthrough came in his late thirties with the role of conflicted East End crime boss Harold Shand in the 1980 gangster classic "The Long Good Friday," which earned him another BAFTA nod. »

- Guy Lodge

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Springboard: Jack O’Connell, Star of 'Starred Up' And Angelina Jolie's 'Unbroken,' On Why He Won’t Sell Out to Hollywood

25 April 2014 1:17 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every Friday, Indiewire's new Springboard column will profile an up-and-comer in the indie world who deserves your attention. At 23, Jack O’Connell has been a mainstay in British cinema for close to a decade, having made his screen debut in Shane Meadows’ "This Is England" and starring in the gritty teen drama "Skins." But the actor’s star is about to get a whole lot brighter: In August, Tribeca Film will release "Starred Up," in which O’Connell plays an angry prisoner clashing with authorities. While "Starred Up" premiered to great acclaim at Telluride and recently found more support at the Tribeca Film Festival, O’Connell has already surfaced again as the lead in the Berlin Festival selection "’71," a brutal war drama featuring the actor in nearly every scene. He also recently surfaced with a supporting role in "300: Rise of an Empire"; later this year, he will be seen »

- Eric Kohn

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 35 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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