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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

14 items from 2014


We Are The Best!'s Lukas Moodysson is cinema's eternal teenager

11 April 2014 4:04 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Swedish director's new film about a teen girl punk band is a coming-of-age masterpiece, but he's keen to remain an outsider

If you happen to be a teenage girl looking to modern cinema for a role model, you're left with two options: live your life by the meaningless platitudes of vest-clad, stern-faced warrior types from a bleak dystopian future (The Hunger Games, Divergent), or dedicate your existence to grabbing money, fellating Uzis and drowning your brain cells with James Franco (Spring Breakers, The Bling Ring). Both of which sound exhausting and neither of which are going to help you get a B+ in German. However, 44-year-old cult Swedish director Lukas Moodysson is about to buck that trend. His new film, We Are The Best!, is a coming-of-age masterpiece which recalls the perceptive comedy of Shane Meadows's A Room For Romeo Brass and Rob Reiner's stirring representation of friendship in Stand By Me. »

- Harriet Gibsone

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The British Cinema Dream Team

4 April 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Today sees the release of Richard Ayoade’s second feature film, The Double. Another solid instalment from one of Britain’s most promising new directors. Also released today is Shan Khan’s Honour, starring arguably the finest working British actor of his generation, Paddy Considine. Considine himself has made appearances in both Ayoade’s films, and with that in mind, here is one UK dream team that we would love to see.

Director- Richard Ayoade

Ayoade is well known for his comedic style. Bursting on to UK television with the It Crowd, his quirky sense of humour seeps through in to both The Double and debut feature, Submarine. The BAFTA nominated Submarine cemented Ayoade as one of the most promising new voices in the British film industry. The black humour, the gentle tragedy, and the hysterical performances is a refreshing voice in the doom and gloom of a lot of British Cinema, »

- Nia Childs

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’12 Years a Slave’ Backer Channel 4 Pledges Continued Support for Indie Filmmaking

31 March 2014 2:07 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

London – Speaking to Variety, David Abraham, chief executive of U.K. broadcaster Channel 4, has reaffirmed the network’s support for independent British filmmaking following news that Tessa Ross, controller of film and drama, is to leave in September.

Ross has been a doughty champion of innovative and risk-taking independent filmmaking during her decade-long tenure as head of Channel 4’s filmmaking arm Film4, which has backed such films as Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” Danny Boyle’s “Slumdog Millionaire” and Kevin Macdonald’s “The Last King of Scotland.”

This approach to filmmaking, which is in line with Channel 4’s remit to deliver content to the audience that “demonstrates innovation, experiment and creativity in the form and content of programs,” and that “exhibits a distinctive character,” will continue after Ross’ departure, Abraham says, but her successor will be encouraged to shape Film4’s editorial policy.

“In a creative »

- Leo Barraclough

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’12 Years a Slave’ Backer Channel 4 Pledges Continued Support for Indie Filmmaking

31 March 2014 2:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London – Speaking to Variety, David Abraham, chief executive of U.K. broadcaster Channel 4, has reaffirmed the network’s support for independent British filmmaking following news that Tessa Ross, controller of film and drama, is to leave in September.

Ross has been a doughty champion of innovative and risk-taking independent filmmaking during her decade-long tenure as head of Channel 4’s filmmaking arm Film4, which has backed such films as Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” Danny Boyle’s “Slumdog Millionaire” and Kevin Macdonald’s “The Last King of Scotland.”

This approach to filmmaking, which is in line with Channel 4’s remit to deliver content to the audience that “demonstrates innovation, experiment and creativity in the form and content of programs,” and that “exhibits a distinctive character,” will continue after Ross’ departure, Abraham says, but her successor will be encouraged to shape Film4’s editorial policy.

“In a creative »

- Leo Barraclough

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Tessa Ross to leave Film4

26 March 2014 6:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Long-time Film4 head Tessa Ross is stepping down from her role later this year to become chief executive of the National Theatre.

Ross will remain in the post until September 2014, and will stay on as chair of the Growth Fund Advisory Council.

She has been on the board of the prestigious Theatre for the past three years.

Her 13-year tenure at the broadcaster began in 2000. She became Head of Film4 in 2003, followed by her current position of Controller of Film and Drama in 2008.

Her exit follows deputy head of film Katherine Butler’s departure from Film4 in January.

Channel 4 chief executive David Abraham will look to fill Ross’ role in the next months.

Abraham said: “Tessa has made as big a contribution to Channel 4 as anyone in its history. I would like to personally thank her for her extraordinary commitment, talent and leadership over 13 remarkable years. I am looking forward to working with her over »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Jack O'Connell may star in This Is England '90: 'Pukey still exists'

19 February 2014 10:20 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Jack O'Connell has hinted that he might appear in Channel 4 series This Is England '90.

His character Pukey Nicholls didn't appear in the TV spin-offs This Is England '86 and This Is England '88 due to schedule clashes, but the actor said that a grown-up Pukey may still return.

Speaking to Empire, O'Connell said: "I'm not speaking in definite terms but I've got a slight inkling. I'm led to believe that Pukey still exists, and the storylines that I've been discussing, they seem quite... chunky enough, anyway."

The actor also discussed his experience on the 2006 film's set with director Shane Meadows.

"Shane gave me my first taste of it, and that put me on set with Stephen Graham," he said.

"I got to see where he puts himself in order to portray characters such as Combo, and that's served me well throughout my whole career, so if I can »

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Paul Cotterell joins Halo

18 February 2014 5:37 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Mixer whose credits include Le Weekend and Calvery to join film and drama division.

Paul Cotterell has been hired by Halo Post Production to join its film and drama division as a senior re-recording mixer.

Cotterell’s mixing credits include Roger Michell’s Le Weekend, John Michael McDonagh’s Calvery and Sam Taylor Johnson’s Nowhere Boy.

He has been BAFTA nominated twice and has also won two UK Screen Awards for Sound. 

Halo’s David Turner said: “Paul is already booked to mix a number of prominent - but currently still confidential - film and drama projects this year.”

Halo’s credits include Tom Hooper’s Les Misérables, Justin Chadwick’s Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, Shane Meadows’ Stone Roses: Made of Stone and Hossein Amini’s The Two Faces of January.

It has also carried out Adr for features such as Rush.

Halo’s recent expansion into film and drama also now includes additional Di services »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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The top 25 underappreciated films of 2008

12 February 2014 4:14 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 13 Feb 2014 - 06:39

Our voyage through history's underappreciated films arrives at the year 2008 - another great year for lesser-seen gems...

For some, 2008 will be memorable as the year of The Dark Knight, with its astonishingly unhinged turn from the late Heath Ledger. Alternatively, it could be remembered as the year a legion Indiana Jones fans left cinemas glum-faced, having sat through Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull.

Elsewhere, Meryl Streep and Pierce Brosnan sang and danced on a Greek island in Mamma Mia!, while Will Smith played an alcoholic superhero in Hancock. But as usual, 2008 offered plenty of watchable movies outside the top 10, which is where we swoop in - like Hancock after a bottle of gin.

So as usual, here's our selection of 25 underappreciated films from the year 2008 - starting with a British horror film starring Michael Fassbender...

25. Eden Lake

James Watkins had written »

- ryanlambie

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Review: Reece Shearsmith freaks out in Ben Wheatley's 'A Field In England'

7 February 2014 12:40 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

There are few filmmakers working right now who seem as set on the expansion of the very definition of "genre" as Ben Wheatley. Film after film, he throws curve balls at the audience, trusting them to be adventurous enough to follow him as he explores some truly dark and oddball corners of human experience. Anyone who saw his breakthrough film "Down Terrace" would probably be excused for thinking he was just another English filmmaker in love with working class criminals, a sort of collision of Mike Leigh and Shane Meadows. With "Kill List," though, he made it clear that whatever you »

- Drew McWeeny

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Line Of Duty: a UK crime thriller well worth your time

4 February 2014 12:49 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Louisa Mellor 5 Feb 2014 - 07:00

Returning soon with its second series, Jed Mercurio’s Line Of Duty is gripping stuff with strong performances…

On the 22nd of July 2005, the day after a series of failed terrorist bombing attempts in the UK capital and a fortnight after fifty-two people had been killed in the London Underground bombings, a Metropolitan Police surveillance team misidentified Brazilian electrician Jean-Charles de Menezes as a fugitive terrorist and fatally shot him as he entered Stockwell Tube Station.

The aftermath of de Menezes’ death, the circumstances of which were the subject of intense press speculation in the run up to a 2008 inquest that resulted in no criminal prosecution for the officers involved, caught the imagination of screenwriter Jed Mercurio.

Previously the creator of Cardiac Arrest and Bodies, a pair of TV dramas that exposed troubling aspects of the modern public health service, Mercurio would use a »

- louisamellor

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Vicky McClure: 'Lol was the most in-depth I've gone with any character'

18 January 2014 5:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The star of This Is England and Line of Duty on strong women, her family's reaction to difficult storylines – and how Kate Moss became a fan

You're about to return to our screens as DC Kate Fleming in BBC2's police thriller Line of Duty. She's a female character in a predominantly male world. Does that appeal to you?

Yes, I certainly look for strong characters – whether that means they're strong in their vulnerability or strong in the way they might be attractive to lots of blokes. There are different ways of being strong. Kate's not vulnerable, she's forceful. When I read the first series, it was very much a woman in a man's world, but now we've got Keeley Hawes [who plays a detective inspector under investigation] it's definitely switched quite a lot of the focus.

Part of the success of Line of Duty seems to be that it's very realistic in a way a lot of police procedurals aren't. »

- Elizabeth Day

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Vicky McClure: 'Lol was the most in-depth I've gone with any character'

18 January 2014 5:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The star of This Is England and Line of Duty on strong women, her family's reaction to difficult storylines – and how Kate Moss became a fan

You're about to return to our screens as DC Kate Fleming in BBC2's police thriller Line of Duty. She's a female character in a predominantly male world. Does that appeal to you?

Yes, I certainly look for strong characters – whether that means they're strong in their vulnerability or strong in the way they might be attractive to lots of blokes. There are different ways of being strong. Kate's not vulnerable, she's forceful. When I read the first series, it was very much a woman in a man's world, but now we've got Keeley Hawes [who plays a detective inspector under investigation] it's definitely switched quite a lot of the focus.

Part of the success of Line of Duty seems to be that it's very realistic in a way a lot of police procedurals aren't. »

- Elizabeth Day

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The top 25 underappreciated films of 2004

8 January 2014 12:48 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 9 Jan 2014 - 06:25

We head back a decade to look at a few films that deserve more attention. Here’s our list of 25 underappreciated movies of 2004...

Think back to 2004, and you might dredge up hazy memories of the computer-generated fairytale sequel Shrek 2, Alfonso’s Harry Potter installment, The Prisoner Of Azkaban, or maybe Mel Gibson’s phenomenally successful Passion Of The Christ.

It’s rather less likely that you’ll remember some of the films on this list. You’re probably aware of the drill by now: we’ve gone back into our distant, beer-addled memories to find 25 of the less commonly-lauded movies from the year 2004.

Some of them did reasonably well at the time, but appear to have been forgotten since (especially the one eclipsed by its own internet meme), while others were coolly received by the public or critics (and sometimes »

- ryanlambie

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From Skins to the Hollywood A-list: Jack O'Connell on Starred Up

2 January 2014 4:05 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A visceral, swaggering performance in the prison drama is set to help propel the former Skins star to stardom. He reveals why 2014 is lining up to be his big year – and why he's ready for it

Jack O'Connell is not pissing about. These are his words. He has just put in the performance of his career in prison drama Starred Up, he's shooting Angelina Jolie's Unbroken – an account of the life of Olympic runner and second-world-war hero Louis Zamperini – in which he again takes the lead, and he's about to tackle a blockbuster with Zack Snyder in 300: Rise of an Empire. He has been acting for 10 years. He's done with partying – he's ready to justify himself. He's intense and focused, older and wiser than the kid who came up through the ranks of the E4 teen drama Skins. He's 23 years old.

I meet O'Connell at the tail end »

- Henry Barnes

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

14 items from 2014


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