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Cannes at 70: The Five Key Years That Changed the Festival Forever

Cannes at 70: The Five Key Years That Changed the Festival Forever
Every Cannes Film Festival is important, but only a handful of the editions have been game-changers. As the festival celebrates its 70th birthday, here are five events that altered the DNA of Cannes, shaping the fest into the global powerhouse that it is today.

The First Festival, 1946

French minister for education and fine arts Jean Zay wanted an international event for France to rival the Venice Film Festival, which had begun in 1932. Several French cities wanted to host; Cannes was selected over Biarritz because it had better hotels. Variety reported in June 1939 that a Cannes festival was planned for September, under the presidency of Louis Lumiere; however, WWII put a freeze on any European festivities.

Cannes finally debuted in September 1946. Variety arranged for coverage, including a special report from Margaret Herrick, the executive secretary of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. Herrick marveled at the speed of travel: It
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Sam Peckinpah's "Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia", Blu-ray Special Edition From Arrow

  • CinemaRetro
By Darren Allison

Attending a film festival in the mid-seventies, Sam Peckinpah was once questioned about how the studios regularly bastardised his vision, his intension and more specifically, if he would ever be able to make a ''pure Peckinpah'' picture. He replied, '’I did 'Alfredo Garcia' and I did it exactly the way I wanted to. Good or bad, like it or not, that was my film.''

The overall narrative for Alfredo Garcia is neither complicated nor convoluted. Warren Oates plays Bennie, a simple pianist residing in a squalid barroom in Mexico. He is approached by two no-nonsense Americans (Robert Webber and Gig Young) who are attempting to track down Alfredo Garcia. The womanising Garcia is the man responsible for the pregnancy of Theresa (Janine Maldonado) the teenage daughter of a powerful Mexican boss El Jefe (Emilio Fernández). In a display of power, El Jefe offers
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Breakout / Der Mann Ohne Nerven

Charlie Bronson cashed in big with this lightweight action thriller co-starring Jill Ireland and Robert Duvall. Did Duvall get involved because the original concept was a serious look at political scandals between big business, the CIA and Chile? The clues from the real source story are still there.

Breakout

Region B + A Blu-ray

Koch Media / Explosive Media (De)

1975 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 96 min. / Street Date January 17, 2017 / Der Mann ohne Nerven / Available from Amazon.de Eur 15,99

Starring: Charles Bronson, Jill Ireland, Robert Duvall, Randy Quaid, Sheree North, John Huston, Jorge Moreno, Paul Mantee, Emilio Fernandez, Alan Vint, Roy Jenson, John Huston.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Editor: Bud Isaacs

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by: Howard B. Kreitsek, Marc Norman, Elliott Baker suggested by the book Ten Second Jailbreak by Warren Hinckle, William Turner, Eliot Asinof.

Produced by: Robert Chartoff, Irwin Winkler

Directed by: Tom Gries

Charles Bronson seems to have been an unhappy
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review – Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974)

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, 1974.

Directed by Sam Peckinpah.

Starring Warren Oates, Isela Vega, Robert Webber, Gig Young, Helmut Dantine, Emilio Fernández, and Kris Kristofferson.

Synopsis:

A bartender and his girlfriend go on a road trip through Mexico to collect the bounty on the head of a dead man accused of fathering the grandchild of a town authoritarian.

According to the director this was the only film he ever made that turned out the way he wanted it to with no interference from outside influences, and anybody accustomed to the works of Sam Peckinpah will immediately recognise it as one of the filmmaker’s most distinctive movies, albeit one that marked the end of his golden period before his demons really took hold and his output started to suffer.

When the daughter of powerful Mexican El Jefe (translated as ‘The Boss’) confesses that the father of her unborn child is one Alfredo Garcia,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

An Encore Edition. Peckinpah's macabre South of the border shoot 'em up is back for a second limited edition, with a new commentary. It's still a picture sure to separate the Peckinpah lovers from the auteur tourists - it's grisly, grim and resolutely exploitative, but also has about it a streak of grimy honesty. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia Blu-ray Twilight Time Encore Edition 1974 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 112 min. / Street Date September, 2016 / available through Screen Archives Entertainment / 29.95 Starring Warren Oates, Isela Vega, Robert Webber, Gig Young, Helmut Dantine, Emilio Fernández, Kris Kristofferson, Chano Urueta, Jorge Russek, Enrique Lucero, Janine Maldonado, Richard Bright, Sharon Peckinpah, Garner Simmons. Cinematography Álex Phillips Jr. Art Direction Agustín Ituarte Film Editors Garth Craven, Dennis E. Dolan, Sergio Ortega, Robbe Roberts Original Music Jerry Fielding Written by Sam Peckinpah, Gordon T. Dawson, Frank Kowalski Produced by Martin Baum, Helmut Dantine, Gordon T. Dawson Directed by
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

La fièvre monte à El Pao

Luis Buñuel's most direct film about revolutionary politics brandishes few if any surreal touches in its clash between French star Gérard Philipe and the Mexican legend María Félix. Borrowing the climax of the opera Tosca, it's an intelligent study of how not to effect change in a corrupt political regime. La fièvre monte à El Pao Region A+B Blu-ray + Pal DVD Pathé (Fr) 1959 / B&W / 1:37 flat (should be 1:66 widescreen) / 96 min. / Los Ambiciosos; "Fever Mounts at El Pao" / Street Date December 4, 2013 / available at Amazon France / Eur 26,27 Starring Gérard Philipe, María Félix, Jean Servais, M.A. Soler, Raúl Dantés, Domingo Soler, Víctor Junco, Roberto Cañedo, Enrique Lucero, Pilar Pellicer, David Reynoso, Andrés Soler. Cinematography Gabriel Figueroa Assistant Director Juan Luis Buñuel Original Music Paul Misraki Written by Luis Buñuel, Luis Alcoriza, Charles Dorat, Louis Sapin from a novel by Henri Castillou Produced by Jacques Bar, Óscar Dancigers, Gregorio Walerstein
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pat Garrett And Billy The Kid

Here's another installment featuring Joe Dante's reviews from his stint as a critic for Film Bulletin circa 1969-1974. Our thanks to Video Watchdog and Tim Lucas for his editorial embellishments!

Post-production tampering mitigates against this Western by Sam Peckinpah finding its deserved reception from better-class audiences. Shortened release version is vague, confusing, and is being sold as routine action entry in saturation breaks where it should perform routinely, no more. Kris Kristofferson and acting debut of Bob Dylan provide youth lures. Rating: R.

“It feels like times have changed,” says Pat Garrett. “Times, maybe—not me," says Billy the Kid. A classical Sam Peckinpah exchange, reflecting one of the numerous obsessive themes that run through his latest Western. But times certainly haven’t changed for Peckinpah—for, despite the overdue success of his last venture, The Getaway, the embattled and iconoclastic director who revolutionized the Western with The Wild Bunch
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Forgotten: "Macario" (1960)

  • MUBI
Macario, just screened in Edinburgh International Film Festival's Focus on Mexico season, is a relatively well-known film by the great and prolific Roberto Gavaldón, but that in itself means little, since even in cinephile circles many film-lovers have never heard of him.Gavaldón was one of the top directors of Mexican cinema's golden age, along with Emilio Fernández and Tito Davison (Buñuel was always something of an outsider). While his work includes the elements of melodrama, social realism and a tinge of film noir which characterise much of this period, he also incorporates a streak of what might be called magic realism. and this is at the forefront of Macario.The first Mexican film nominated for an Oscar, losing out to The Virgin Spring, which bizarrely also features a magic spring bubbling up under mysterious and perhaps divinely-inspired circumstances, Macario derives from a story by the mysterious B. Traven (Treasure
See full article at MUBI »

Film Forum Honoring Legendary Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa

While the name Gabriel Figueroa may not be a familiar one to many, even those with a stronger affinity for filmmaking and the art behind it, New York’s own Film Forum is hoping to change that.

On June 5, the theater began a career spanning retrospective surrounding the work of iconic cinematographer and Mexican film industry legend Gabriel Figueroa. Taking a look at 19 of the photographer’s films, the series is running in conjunction with the new exhibition at El Museo del Barrio, entitled Under The Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa – Art And Film.

Best known as a pioneer of Mexican cinema, primarily with his work alongside director Emilio Fernandez, Figueroa’s work was as varied as they come. His work with Fernandez is without a doubt this retrospective’s highlight, particularly films like Wildflower. One of the many times Mexican cinema’s “Big Four” worked together, the film saw the
See full article at CriterionCast »

Class Disparities and Prostitution Tackled in Early Female Director's Drama

Pioneering woman director Lois Weber socially conscious drama 'Shoes' among Library of Congress' Packard Theater movies (photo: Mary MacLaren in 'Shoes') In February 2015, National Film Registry titles will be showcased at the Library of Congress' Packard Campus Theater – aka the Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation – in Culpeper, Virginia. These range from pioneering woman director Lois Weber's socially conscious 1916 drama Shoes to Robert Zemeckis' 1985 blockbuster Back to the Future. Another Packard Theater highlight next month is Sam Peckinpah's ultra-violent Western The Wild Bunch (1969), starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine. Also, Howard Hawks' "anti-High Noon" Western Rio Bravo (1959), toplining John Wayne and Dean Martin. And George Cukor's costly remake of A Star Is Born (1954), featuring Academy Award nominees Judy Garland and James Mason in the old Janet Gaynor and Fredric March roles. There's more: Jeff Bridges delivers a colorful performance in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 10 “One Last Job” Scenes

With November Man out, excitement for Pierce Bosnan’s return to spying is at an all-time high for many James Bond fans. November Man, based on the seventh installment of Bill Granger’s book series called There Are No Spies, is about ex- CIA agent Peter Devereaux (Pierce Bosnan). While living a quiet life in Switzerland, Devereaux is ejected out of retirement for one last mission. Although the concept of the “one last mission/job” is not a new concept for Hollywood, it definitely has its place in cinema history, branching out to a wide range of reasons why our beloved characters are being pulled back into their past lives. From a retiree’s last gig, to the bad-boy-gone-good-and-then-bad-again mission, to the revenge premise, mythology of the ex-professional can surely delight and excite us to champion our heroes for one last fight. Here are scenes from ten incredible “one last job” films,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Mexican Film Legend Columba Dominguez Dies at 85

Mexican Film Legend Columba Dominguez Dies at 85
Mexico City — Mexican actress Columba Dominguez, who worked with director Luis Bunuel during Mexico's golden age of cinema, died at 85 on Wednesday of unknown causes. Dominguez, recipient of a lifetime achievement award at Mexico's Ariel Awards ceremony last year, appeared in more than 60 films and TV series throughout a career that spanned six decades. She is best known for the lead role in the Bunuel drama The River and Death and for Pueblerina, a romantic drama from renowned writer-director Emilio Fernandez. Dominguez's nephew Giuliano Molina, who made the announcement of the death via Twitter, posted a

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Definitive Original Screenplays: 40-31

As we continue to move forward through the list, let us consider: how do you define an original screenplay? In theory, everything is based on something. Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine is basically a modern A Streetcar Named Desire. But, somehow, Jasmine is classified as an original screenplay. When a film is wholly original, nothing like it had been done before, and others have tried to copy it since. Plenty of original screenplays (some in this list) take on tired genres, but flip the script. But the ones that really catch the audience by surprise are the ones that feel imaginative, creative, and different.

40. Spirited Away (2001)

Written by Hayao Miyazaki

That’s a good start! Once you’ve met someone, you never really forget them. It just takes a while for your memories to return.

No writer/director on this list may be more fantastical than the great Hayao Miyazaki,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Italian Siren of Sword-and-Sandal Epics, Sex Comedies Has Died: Rossana Podestà

Rossana Podestà dead at 79: ‘Helen of Troy’ actress later featured in sword-and-sandal spectacles, risqué sex comedies (photo: Jacques Sernas and Rossana Podestà in ‘Helen of Troy’) Rossana Podestà, the sensual star of the 1955 epic Helen of Troy and other sword-and-sandal European productions of the ’50s and ’60s — in addition to a handful of risqué sex comedies of the ’70s — died earlier today, December 10, 2013, in Rome according to several Italian news outlets. Podestà was 79. She was born Carla Dora Podestà on August 20, 1934, in, depending on the source, either Zlitan or Tripoli, in Libya, at the time an Italian colony. According to the IMDb, the renamed Rossana Podestà began her film career in 1950, when she was featured in a small role in Dezsö Ákos Hamza’s Strano appuntamento ("Strange Appointment"). However, according to online reports, she was actually discovered by director Léonide Moguy, who cast her in a small role in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Academy To Honor Mexican Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa Sept. 17

Gabriel Figueroa, scene from the film La perla, directed by Emilio Fernandez, 1945.

Writer-director Gregory Nava, actor Gael García Bernal, cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto and Gabriel Figueroa Flores will celebrate the life and career of the renowned Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa on Tuesday, September 17, at 7:30 p.m. at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. The evening will feature an onstage discussion and excerpts from many of Figueroa’s greatest cinematic achievements. The program serves as a prelude to the exhibition “Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa – Art and Film,” co-presented by the Academy and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which will open at Lacma later this month.

Figueroa (1907–1997) is often referred to as “The Fourth Muralist” of Mexico, and his seminal work contributed to the establishment of a visual culture and national identity in post-revolutionary Mexico. His films include such Mexican classics as “María Candelaria,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Lacma and Academy to Present Major Exhibition on Mexican Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (Clips)

Lacma and Academy to Present Major Exhibition on Mexican Cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa (Clips)
Beginning September 22 and running through February of 2014, Lacma will host "Under the Mexican Sky," an exhibition co-presented by the Academy highlighting the prolific and award-winning Mexican cinematographer Gabriel Figueroa. His career spanned 50 years and over 200 films. Clips below. Recognized as one of the most important cinematographers of the 20th century, Figueroa collaborated with artists such as Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco, and filmmakers like Emilio Fernandez and John Ford. Nominated for an Oscar for John Huston's "The Night of the Iguana" (1964), Figueroa won awards at Cannes, a Golden Globe and won best cinematography each year at the Mexican Ariel Awards from 1947 to 1951. He worked on seven films by Luis Bunuel including "Los Olvidados" (1950) and "The Exterminating Angel" (1962). The exhibition features film clips, paintings, photographs, posters and documents drawn from Figueroa’s archive, now owned by the Televisa Foundation. In addition, the...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Holden Has Two 'Wild' Movies Tonight

William Holden movies: ‘The Bridge on the River KwaiWilliam Holden is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" featured actor today, August 21, 2013. Throughout the day, TCM has been showing several William Holden movies made at Columbia, though his work at Paramount (e.g., I Wanted Wings, Dear Ruth, Streets of Laredo, Dear Wife) remains mostly off-limits. Right now, TCM is presenting David Lean’s 1957 Best Picture Academy Award winner and all-around blockbuster The Bridge on the River Kwai, the Anglo-American production that turned Lean into filmdom’s brainier Cecil B. DeMille. Until then a director of mostly small-scale dramas, Lean (quite literally) widened the scope of his movies with the widescreen-formatted Southeast Asian-set World War II drama, which clocks in at 161 minutes. Even though William Holden was The Bridge on the River Kwai‘s big box-office draw, the film actually belongs to Alec Guinness’ Pow British commander and to
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Smith to Star in Reboot of Penckinpah's Ultra-Violent Classic Western?

Will Smith: The Wild Bunch remake (photo: Will Smith in After Earth) Will Smith has been mentioned in connection with Focus, the caper tale that was to have starred Ben Affleck and Kristen Stewart, and is to star in Edward Zwick’s Hurricane Katrina drama The American Can. But that’s not all. His producing company is working on a remake of the Broadway musical Annie — which got a less-than-satisfactory screen version back in 1982 — and apparently he wants to revive The Wild Bunch as well. Set during the Mexican Revolution of the 1910s, Sam Peckinpah’s ultra-violent 1969 classic Western features William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Edmond O’Brien, and other movie veterans as a group of outlaws fleeing from Robert Ryan while out to do one last job in war-torn northern Mexico. The Will Smith The Wild Bunch reboot, however, is to be set in the present, though the perilous
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Will Smith Takes on The Wild Bunch Remake

Will Smith Takes on The Wild Bunch Remake
Will Smith is in talks to star in and produce a modern remake of the Western The Wild Bunch for Warner Bros. If a deal is finalized, he will produce alongside Jerry Weintraub, who the actor-producer worked with on the 2010 The Karate Kid remake.

Sam Peckinpah directed the original classic The Wild Bunch, which starred William Holden, Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, and Edmond O'Brien as a group of aging outlaws who plan one final score on the Texas-Mexico border. The reboot will be set in present day, and focus on a crooked DEA agent who puts a team together to go after a Mexican drug lord's fortune.

Back in January 2011, The Wild Bunch was mentioned as one of several titles Warner Bros. was looking to remake, along with Lethal Weapon and The Dirty Dozen. Tony Scott was in talks with the studio in August 2011 to direct the project, before
See full article at MovieWeb »

Celebrating the Naked Man Who Made the Oscar Possible

Every year, dozens of people wrap their hands around Emilio Fernandez‘s torso and hoist him high into the air while thanking their supporters. Usually, they’re played off the stage by a swelling orchestra, but they still get to take Fernandez home. Fortunately for everyone involved, he comes in portable size that you can keep easily on your shelf because Emilio Fernandez is the Oscar. Or, rather, the Oscar statue is Emilio Fernandez. As the story goes, he was a good friend of actress Dolores Del Rio who introduced Fernandez to her future husband, Cedric Gibbons in 1928. Gibbons was an art director at MGM, an original academy member and the man who supervised the design of the trophy that would go on to become an international icon. All he had to do was convince Fernandez to pose nude, and AMPAS had their statue. But Fernandez was more than just the body that would become Oscar. He
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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