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8 items from 2012


Interview with Jean Eustache

24 September 2012 5:15 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Photo: Alix Cléo Roubaud, Portrait de Jean Eustache, 1981 © Fonds Alix Cléo Roubaud

An interview with Jean Eustache conducted by Philippe Haudiquet and originally published in La Revue du Cinéma, no. 250, May 1971. Translation by Ted Fendt.

Philippe Haudiquet: You’ve made four films that to me seemed to indicate a personal path in our cinema. Now, you want to do something completely different. Where does this break between the films you directed before and the last one come from?

Jean Eustache: I decided to break with the films that I was making because they were suffocating me.

Ph: Why were they suffocating you? Wasn’t it a kind of cinema that had already broken away from the system, as much in terms of how it was made (production and direction) as by its choice of subject matter?

Je: Yeah, but as I was working more in an artisanal manner, »

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Tiff 2012. Correspondences #3

10 September 2012 11:57 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Dear Danny,

No apologies needed for your rich reportage. One of the nice things about this conversation format is that it allows me to jot down titles that I might have otherwise missed, helping me shine some light into the frequent disorientation of packed, conflicting schedules.

Incidentally, illumination is what the title of Carlos Reygadas’ new film promises. For the opening ten minutes or so, Post Tenebras Lux follows a tiny girl excitedly splashing in a muddy field, dogs and cows meandering around her as an incoming storm rumbles in the distance. The sun disappears behind clouds, and lightning flash silhouettes the lonely toddler. Reygadas is very clever at stuff like this, coming up with a vast, assertive composition and then letting unpredictable elements like children, animals and weather play their part in it. But that’s not enough: He has to further make his hand felt by smearing the »

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Tiff Cinematheque presents a Summer in France: ‘The Mother and the Whore’ is uncompromising in recreating the frustrating banality of life

1 August 2012 12:16 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Mother and the Whore

Directed by Jean Eustache

Written by Jean Eustache

Meet Alexandre (Jean-Pierre Léaud); Alexandre loves to smoke, drinks nothing if it isn’t spiked with alcohol, and spends much of his waking existence reading newspapers and ogling women; doing all the aforementioned while languidly sitting in Parisian cafés.

He is chauvinistic, self-absorbed, lazy, unemployed, casuistic, and painfully pretentious. He talks a great deal, and listens on occasion, but above all, Alexandre carries an air of self-satisfaction and snarky didacticism with him wherever he goes.

In summation, he’s Parisian; or what foreigners believe Parisians to be.

In Jean Eustache’s The Mother and the Whore, Alexandre is the film’s focal character, but also a stereotypical one. Hedonistic to a fault, Alexandre is the typical apparition of the envisioned Frenchman, the manifestation of our fanciful notions.

He is the man that indulges in the sensual pleasures »

- Justin Li

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Tiff Cinematheque presents a Summer in France: ‘The Mother and the Whore’ is uncompromising in recreating the frustrating banality of life

30 July 2012 8:13 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Mother and the Whore

Directed by Jean Eustache

Written by Jean Eustache

France, 1973

Meet Alexandre (Jean-Pierre Léaud); Alexandre loves to smoke, drinks nothing if it isn’t spiked with alcohol, and spends much of his waking existence reading newspapers and ogling women; doing all the aforementioned while languidly sitting in Parisian cafés.

He is chauvinistic, self-absorbed, lazy, unemployed, casuistic, and painfully pretentious. He talks a great deal, and listens on occasion, but above all, Alexandre carries an air of self-satisfaction and snarky didacticism with him wherever he goes.

In summation, he’s Parisian; or what foreigners believe Parisians to be.

In Jean Eustache’s The Mother and the Whore, Alexandre is the film’s focal character, but also a stereotypical one. Hedonistic to a fault, Alexandre is the typical apparition of the envisioned Frenchman, the manifestation of our fanciful notions.

He is the man that indulges in the sensual »

- Justin Li

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Toronto’s Tiff Bell Lightbox in the Midst of Majestic French Cinema Retrospective

23 July 2012 8:30 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Who knew that some septuagenarian films in a non-English language about class conflicts, prisoners of war, and cancan dancing could still be the hottest tickets in town? The Tiff Cinematheque did, evidently, as they’ve watched their seats fill up without fail during many a French-filled summer in their twenty-odd year history. In 1997-99 – way back when they were still Cinematheque Ontario and Tiff was just a neighboring, momentary event – James Quandt and co. slathered their summer line-ups with exclusively French productions and practically nothing else. The Ago’s 200-seat Jackman Hall could hardly contain the swarms of cinephiles salivating for the opportunity to catch rare (even rarer now) 35mm prints of the medium’s staple masterpieces: The Poetic Realists, The French Impressionists, The New Wave, The Left Bank, and Pialat (who’s earned his own category).

While this year’s incarnation already kicked off with the aforementioned Jean Renoir »

- Blake Williams

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Mid-year in Paris: Tiff Cinematheque presents ‘Summer in France’

1 July 2012 5:48 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Starting July 13th and running through September 2nd, prepare yourself to be transported to a summer vacation in France. All you have to do is check in at Tiff Cinematheque (350 King Street West, Toronto).

The 41-film sabbatical will make take you to popular and renowned destinations that include Jean-Luc Godard’s Pierrot le Fou (1965), Luis Buñuel’s Belle de Jour (1967), François Truffaut’s The 400 Blows (1959), and Jean Renoir’s La Grande Illusion (1937).

We’ll even be making stops at more remote, recherché locations, such as Jean Eustache’s The Mother and the Whore (1973) and Jean-Pierre Melville’s Army of Shadows (1969).

Remember to pack lightly, re-schedule accordingly, and prepare for the ultimate staycation. Bon voyage!

Screenings include:

La Grand Illusion (1937)

Friday July 13 at 6:00 Pm

Sunday July 22 at 7:30 Pm

117 minutes

Heralded as “one of the fifty best films in the history of cinema” by Time Out Film Guide, Jean Renoir »

- Justin Li

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Festival Filmmaker Spotlight: Olmo Omerzu

18 June 2012 10:00 AM, PDT | Film Independent | See recent Film Independent news »

Director Olmo Omerzu

Director: Olmo Omerzu

Festival Entry: A Night Too Young – Czech Republic

Narrative Competition

On New Years Day, two innocent 12-year-old boys score vodka for three strangers and get invited to an adult party they’ll never forget. This darkly comic tale by gifted 26-year-old Czech director Olmo Omerzu upends the conventions of the coming of age movie. ★ North American Premiere

Directed By: Olmo Omerzu

Executive Producer: Lukas Svitil

Producer: Jiří Konečný

Screenwriters: Bruno Hájek, Jakub Felcman, Olmo Omerzu

Cinematographer: Lukáš Milota

Editor: Janka Vlčková

Cast: Martin Pechlát, Jirí Cerny, Natálie Rehorová, Vojtech Machuta, Jan Vasi, Milan Mikulcík

We asked Czech director Olmo Omerzu about everything from his inspirations to challenges. Turns out, working with child actors is hard (he’s not the first Festival filmmaker to cite this particular challenge!). Here’s what else he had to say:

Who are you and what do you do?

I’m Olmo Omerzu. »

- Film Independent

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Meet the 2012 Sundance Filmmakers #32: Ira Sachs, 'Keep the Lights On'

12 January 2012 8:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

New York filmmaker Ira Sachs returns to Sundance with his new feature "Keep the Lights On," an autobiographical gay romance that spans several years. What's it about? A tumultuous, decade-long relationship between two men in NYC – the addictions that tear them apart, the bonds that keep them together. Director Ira Sachs says: "Inspired by filmmakers like Bergman, Cassavetes, Jean Eustache, and other heroes of mine who worked in a very personal type of cinema, I wanted to make a movie that examines and reveals the delicate intricacies of a relationship, as I saw it. To do so without shame, without judgment, but with lightness, passion, humor and love. Why do people stay in relationships that are tough from almost the very beginning? What holds two people together when so many forces – drugs, sex, secrets, lies – pull them apart? Never simple questions to answer, "Keep the Lights On" is my attempt »

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8 items from 2012


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