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Contest: Win Free Registration for the Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies’ January 9th Class in New York City

  • DailyDead
A different kind of class will be back in session in New York City and London with a new semester of the Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies. The latest lineup of horror-themed classes and lectures will kick off stateside with an in-depth look at the 1974 folk horror film Penda's Fen, and we've been provided with two free registration slots for the class to give away to lucky Daily Dead readers.

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Prize Details: (2) winners will receive:

(1) free registration for "Sacred Disobedience: On Penda's Fen," a Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies class taking place from 7:00pm–10:00pm Est on Tuesday, January 9th at New York City's Film Noir Cinema (122 Meserole, Greenpoint, Brooklyn).

How to Enter: For a chance to win, email contest@dailydead.com with the subject "Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies Contest". Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Entry Details: The contest will end at 12:01pm Est on Monday,
See full article at DailyDead »

Oscars 2018: How the ‘Dunkirk’ and ‘Phantom Thread’ Original Scores Dodged Disqualification

In the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ announcement of 141 films qualified for Best Original Score, the biggest news stemmed from an absence: No controversy. “I, Tonya” and “The Greatest Showman” scores were deemed ineligible based on their predominant use of songs, while “Call Me By Your Name” and “Detroit” didn’t even submit, presumedly knowing they wouldn’t qualify. Those omissions merit a shrug, unlike the outrage that followed last year’s disqualification of Johann Johannsson’s “Arrival” and Lesley Barber’s “Manchester By the Sea” scores.

This year, people were closely watching what happened to Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood and legend Hans Zimmer. Each has a history of running afoul of qualification rules, and each has one of the most celebrated scores of 2017, “Phantom Thread” and “Dunkirk.”

In the case of Greenwood, devoted fans still haven’t gotten over the disqualification of his brilliant 35-minute original score
See full article at Indiewire »

Historical Dramas Are Difficult to Score, but Attract Awards Attention

Historical dramas and those rooted in real-life events can be among the most challenging to score, but also yield a proportionally high number of Oscar winners. Four such live-action releases are among the most talked-about this awards season.

All the Money in the World

Music by Daniel Pemberton

For Ridley Scott’s film about the 1973 kidnapping of oil tycoon J. Paul Getty’s grandson, now completing post-production after the last-minute replacement of lead Kevin Spacey by Christopher Plummer, English composer Pemberton made a bold choice: voices of many kinds, from operatic to Italian folk singers.

“Getty sees himself as this grand figure,” Pemberton explains. “We have medieval voices, which refer back to his belief that he was descended from [Roman emperor] Hadrian; and the more grand operatic music, which was a slight reflection of Rome [where much of the film was shot] but also Getty’s own vision of self-identity.”

For the kidnappers, whose world is “grubby, rural, coarse and out in the middle of nowhere
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar 2017: It’s Hans Zimmer’s ‘Dunkirk’ vs. ‘Blade Runner 2049’ for Best Original Score

  • Indiewire
Oscar 2017: It’s Hans Zimmer’s ‘Dunkirk’ vs. ‘Blade Runner 2049’ for Best Original Score
For Hans Zimmer, it began with Christopher Nolan’s pocket watch on “Dunkirk” and a creative flourish at the keyboard immediately following his first viewing of Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049.” The result was the creation of two very different but experimental scores in collaboration with Zimmer’s protege, Benjamin Wallfisch (“It,” “Hidden Figures”), which are both Oscar frontrunners. (A third composer, Lorne Balfe, also contributed to the “Dunkirk” score, but only two composers can be submitted to the academy’s music branch for Oscar consideration.)

“I love these days how we are truly breaking down the walls between sound design and music,” Zimmer said. But to help convey “the visceral realism” of “Dunkirk’s” legendary evacuation of more than 300,000 British and Allied troops under German bombardment, the score needed to be in perfect sync with picture and sound. And this was complicated by playing with time and the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Blade Runner 2049’: Composer Benjamin Wallfisch on How to Follow Up a Classic Sci-Fi Score

‘Blade Runner 2049’: Composer Benjamin Wallfisch on How to Follow Up a Classic Sci-Fi Score
It’s been a big year for composer Benjamin Wallfisch. First, he reimagined Edward Elgar’s “Nimrod” to create the most talked-about musical moment in Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk”; then he composed a complex, frightening symphonic score for “It,” now the most successful horror movie of all time; and most recently, he collaborated with Hans Zimmer on the music for one of the most anticipated films of the season, “Blade Runner 2049,” opening today.

Wallfisch has often worked with Zimmer (writing additional music for “12 Years a Slave,” “The Little Prince” and “Batman v. Superman,” then a full partnership on last year’s “Hidden Figures”) and, says the composer, “Blade Runner” began much the same way, with a phone call from Zimmer asking him to come over to his studio.

There he found Zimmer conferring with director Denis Villeneuve and editor Joe Walker about the musical needs of the sequel to the 1982 Harrison Ford film. They
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Dunkirk’ Review

Stars: Fionn Whitehead, Tom Hardy, Mark Rylance, Tom Glynn-Carney, Cillian Murphy, Kenneth Branagh, Harry Styles, Aneurin Barnard | Written and Directed by Christopher Nolan

On paper, Christopher Nolan’s follow-up to Interstellar couldn’t be more different to the puzzle boxes which have defined his movies to date. Here’s a real historic event portrayed in well under two hours, with no room for sci-fi elements or high concept hooks. That it feels, in the end, very much like you’ve watched a Christopher Nolan film is surprising, for reasons both pleasing and not-so-pleasing.

We’re thrown into the nightmare of 1940, when more than 300,000 British Expeditionary Force troops were trapped on the titular beach, with the German hordes moving in. (In one of the film’s many authentic touches, we get to see the German propaganda leaflets promising the Allies’ imminent destruction.)

Three stories – and here’s where the narrative is Nolanised.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Could Your Favorite TV Show Become a Broadway Musical?

Given all the musicals we've seen on TV recently -- NBC's live-performance versions of "Peter Pan" and "The Sound of Music," not to mention ABC's "Galavant" and all six seasons of Fox's "Glee" -- it's a wonder that the pipeline hasn't flowed in the opposite direction, from the small screen to Broadway.

That may change with the announcements that a couple of TV-based musicals are in the works. One is "Bombshell," the Marilyn Monroe biographical musical that was created and staged over the course of two seasons on NBC's "Smash." Bringing it to Broadway would seem easy enough -- the songs and choreography already exist; all that's needed is a book.

The other is a stage version of "Downton Abbey," which may launch after the British drama's sixth and final season wraps this winter. John Lunn, who composes the music for the series, says he envisions an international tour, starring
See full article at Moviefone »

Disney 53: Fantasia 2000

Directed by Pixote Hunt, Hendel Butoy, Eric Goldberg, James Algar, Francis Glebas, Paul and Gaetan Brizzi

1999/75 minutes

Fantasia is timeless. It may run 10, 20 or 30 years. It may run after I’m gone. Fantasia is an idea in itself. I can never build another Fantasia. I can improve. I can elaborate. That’s all.”

– Walt Disney

Unveiled just after the clock struck midnight on Dec 31st 1999, making it the first film to be released in the new millennium (pedantry over the date of the beginning of the millennium notwithstanding), Fantasia 2000 is a hidden gem of the Disney 53. Admit it, how many of you remember it? In any case, Fantasia 2000 was the result of almost a decade worth of work; each segment of the film was produced individually, during lulls between major features.

The IMAX Experience

Fantasia 2000 was the first feature length animated film to be presented in IMAX,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Film-makers must trust the audience

Scarecrow and The King of Marvin Gardens – quirky, unstylised films made in the 60s and 70s that refused to smooth their rough edges. This bravery, Adam Mars-Jones argues, is what film-makers are missing today

The label "independent film" doesn't mean what it once did, and the Sundance festival is part of the reason. The moment aspiring film-makers realised there was a potential shortcut to distribution and acclaim, they started smoothing off their rough edges – consciously or without even noticing – or at least they began to stylise themselves. Either way, the overall effect of the festival has not been to promote individuality but to erode it. So it's a mild beneficial shock to watch two American films of the early 1970s on re-release – not because they're masterpieces, exactly, but because they give the flavour of a different set of assumptions.

Scarecrow, directed by Jerry Schatzberg, won a prize at Cannes in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Cameron vows to bone up on his history after Letterman show gaffe

'I'm a history obsessive, so I'm sorry I didn't do better,' says prime minister, who didn't know translation of Magna Carta

David Cameron has promised to brush up on his history after fluffing a mock test set for him on live TV by the Us chatshow host David Letterman.

"I'm a history obsessive, so I'm sorry I didn't do better," Cameron said when he was asked in São Paulo about his performance on the Late Show with David Letterman.

"I think, when I get home and do my children's homework maybe I need to sit down and do a little bit extra myself."

Downing Street was taking a relaxed approach after the prime minister failed to give the English name for Magna Carta (Great Charter). He also gave the wrong name for the composer of the music to Rule Britannia, naming Edward Elgar instead of Thomas Arne.

Officials pointed
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Cameron stumped by David Letterman's 'British history test'

David Cameron stumped by David Letterman's 'British history test'
David Cameron was left stumped by basic questions about British history and culture during his appearance on The Late Show with David Letterman. Cameron became the first serving British prime minister to appear on the late night CBS talkshow on Wednesday (September 26), and was played in with a rendition of 'Rule Britannia' from Letterman's house band. However, he incorrectly attributed the musical arrangement of James Thomson's poem to Edward Elgar, when it was in fact set to music by Thomas Arne in 1740. "You have found me out. That's bad, I've ended my career on your show tonight," Cameron joked when told the correct answer. Letterman also asked him questions about the document known as Magna Carta, which Cameron correctly said was signed in 1215 at Runnymede. Describing the document as the country's first declaration (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Cameron Flubs Letterman's UK Quiz

  • newser
David Cameron became the first serving British prime minister to appear on the Late Show With David Letterman last night, but he was stumped by some of the host's questions—about Britain. The band played "Rule Britannia" to welcome Cameron, who guessed that the composer was Edward Elgar rather than Thomas Arne, the Financial Times reports. He correctly answered that the Magna Carta had been signed in 1215, but didn't know that it meant "Great Charter" in English. "I’ve ended my career on your show tonight," Cameron quipped. Cameron, who is in New York for the United Nations General Assembly,...
See full article at newser »

Olympians Are Ready To Party At Closing Ceremony

Olympians Are Ready To Party At Closing Ceremony
London -- British rock stars are seizing the stage to close the Olympics with an extravaganza that promises to keep a worldwide audience entertained well into the night - and dancing all the way to Rio.

The Who, the surviving members of Queen and the Spice Girls were expected to headline a fun and frivolous closing ceremony, celebrating the remarkable crop of pop icons the host country has given the world for decades.

Artistic director Kim Gavin has promised "the best after-show party that's ever been," and as details of the lineup leaked in the British press days ahead of time, there was no reason to doubt him.

The ceremony had something for everyone, from tween girls to 1960s hippies. George Michael, Muse, Fatboy Slim and the One Direction, the British cotton-candy boy band of the moment, were all expected to perform.

The best seats were for the 10,800 Olympic athletes,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Has London 2012 got us all blubbing? I second that emotion

With Danny Boyle's opening ceremony setting the perfect tone, Britons can express patriotism with irony and genuine feeling

Maybe, ultimately, it was the pyjamas. Nobody, surely, has worn pyjamas on an Olympic stadium track before if not by mistake. But there was the deaf choir of children, in pyjamas, signing God Save the Queen. "It was as if someone had said: "If you get into your jimjams and brush your teeth, you can stay up late to sing for the Queen," said my colleague Tim, who was reduced to tears by that moment in Danny Boyle's opening ceremony. That was part of Boyle's crying-time genius: the human touch, the cultivation of empathy, the cunning manipulation of sentiment that any director worth his salt can deploy without – ideally – making us feel that it's phoney.

And so began an unexpected festival of emotion that, by rights, London 2012 had no right
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Danny Boyle: Opening ceremony is a 'warm-up'

Danny Boyle described the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics as a 'warm-up' act for the Games. The Oscar winning film director is the man responsible for the incredible transformation of the stadium in Stratford, London where the athletics will take place. He said: 'Tonight's a warm-up act for the Games. That's one of the things you have to keep remembering. 'You big it up for different reasons, and you hear it bigged up or slammed or whatever it is and you've got to keep remembering we're the warm-up act.' The ceremony started with classical music from Edward Elgar, the hymn 'Jerusalem' and 'Danny Boy'. However the song soon shifted to the rock genre. Danny - who brought
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

Wallace: 'I have a feeling Gromit has a hankering to be a composer himself'

The cheese-loving inventor has written a concerto for the Proms – without any help from his dog

Without being rude... your creations have a reputation for not always working as planned (1). How can you be sure your Concerto (2) will not end in tears?

Don't worry – me and Gromit will be backstage to keep an eye on things in person. What could possibly go wrong?

A concerto normally specifies which instrument(s) it has been written for. My Concerto in Ee, Lad does not do that. Is this a deliberate attempt to redefine musical form?

I just couldn't decide what to write it for – spoons, paper and comb, kazoo … So in the end I thought I'd just write it for all of them. With the odd cow bell thrown in for good measure.

Is Gromit pissed off you didn't ask him to collaborate with you?

I suspect an element of professional jealousy
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Wallace: 'I have a feeling Gromit has a hankering to be a composer himself'

The cheese-loving inventor has written a concerto for the Proms – without any help from his dog

Without being rude... your creations have a reputation for not always working as planned (1). How can you be sure your Concerto (2) will not end in tears?

Don't worry – me and Gromit will be backstage to keep an eye on things in person. What could possibly go wrong?

A concerto normally specifies which instrument(s) it has been written for. My Concerto in Ee, Lad does not do that. Is this a deliberate attempt to redefine musical form?

I just couldn't decide what to write it for – spoons, paper and comb, kazoo … So in the end I thought I'd just write it for all of them. With the odd cow bell thrown in for good measure.

Is Gromit pissed off you didn't ask him to collaborate with you?

I suspect an element of professional jealousy
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mindy Newell: The Agony And The Ecstasy Of Writing

Ah, the joys of writing.

Well, not when you’re working on your capstone project, the culmination of the past 18 months, the paper that will lead me to that walk down the aisle in mortarboard and gown to the hallowed, somber notes of Pomp and Circumstance. How did that get to be the graduation processional march anyway? Wait, I’m going to look it up. Tawk amongst yawselves….

This is what Wikipedia says: “The Pomp and Circumstances Marches, Op. 39” are a series of marches for orchestra composed by Sir Edward Elgar. In the United States, the Trio section,” Land of Hope and Glory” of March No. 1 is sometimes known simply as” Pomp and Circumstance” or as “The Graduation March,” and is played as the processional tune at virtually all high school and college graduation ceremonies. It was first played at such a ceremony on 28 June 1905, at Yale University, where Samuel Sanford,
See full article at Comicmix »

TV highlights 10/02/2012

  • The Guardian - TV News
The Prince And The Composer | Room 101 | Wild About Pandas | Law & Order UK | How The Brits Rocked America: Go West | Criminal Minds

The Prince And The Composer

7.30pm, BBC4

One does like a tune one can hum: Prince Charles speaks up for composer Sir Hubert Parry (1848-1918), best known for setting William Blake's Jerusalem to music, and the hymn Dear Lord And Father of Mankind. Parry is often considered a minor figure, especially compared to English composers who followed, such as Edward Elgar and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Charles thinks Parry deserves better and, with the help of Parry's music and contributions from the likes of pianist and broadcaster David Owen Morris, he builds a decent case. Jonathan Wright

Room 101

8.30pm, BBC1

The celebrity booker's net trawls and catches Ross Noble, Jamelia and Germaine Greer – who might just be the first recipient of a Room 101 audience heckle. A bland heckle,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ken Russell obituary

Formidable film director with an impish sense of humour and a talent to entertain and provoke

Ken Russell, who has died aged 84, was so often called rude names – the wild man of British cinema, the apostle of excess, the oldest angry young man in the business – that he gave up denying it all quite early in his career. Indeed, he often seemed to court the very publicity that emphasised only the crudest assessment of his work. He gave the impression that he cared not a damn. Those who knew him better, however, knew that he did. Underneath all the showbiz bluster, he was an old softie. Or, perhaps as accurately, a talented boy who never quite grew up.

It has, of course, to be said that he was capable of almost any enormity in the careless rapture he brought to making his films. He could be dreadfully cruel to his undoubted talent,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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