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Andrei Tarkovsky’s Final Film ‘The Sacrifice’ Receives Trailer for Theatrical Restoration

After a gorgeous restoration of his landmark existential sci-f film Stalker earlier this year, another Andrei Tarkovsky masterpiece has been remastered and is coming to theaters. The director’s final film, The Sacrifice, has recently undergone a 4K restoration and ahead of a screening at New York Film Festival and theatrical run starting at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a new trailer has arrived.

Judging from the trailer, this restoration does justice to Tarkovsky’s swan song with no shortages of haunting imagery. The Sweden-shot film follows an upper-class family who learns World War III is upon them. Starring Sven Vollter, Alexander Erland Josephson, Allan Edwall, Valerie Mairesse, Gudron S Gisladottir, and Susan Fleetwood, check out the trailer and poster below.

The sacrifice in Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film, completed only months before his death from cancer at the age of 54, is performed by Alexander, an aging professor who
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Sacrifice’ Trailer: Andrei Tarkovsky’s Newly Restored Final Masterpiece Returns [Exclusive]

When he passed away at the age of 54, Andrei Tarkovsky left a tremendous cinematic legacy with only seven feature films to his name. And his final film, “The Sacrifice,” completed just months before he would succumb to cancer, was his final masterpiece. Now, it has been newly restored and its headed back to the big screen where it deserves to be experienced.

Starring Sven Vollter, Erland Josephson, Allan Edwall, Valerie Mairesse, Gudron S Gisladottir, and Susan Fleetwood, and gorgeously shot by cinematographer Sven Nykvist, the film takes viewers to the anxious edge of World War III, where one family faces the looming horror.

Continue reading ‘The Sacrifice’ Trailer: Andrei Tarkovsky’s Newly Restored Final Masterpiece Returns [Exclusive] at The Playlist.
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Criterion Collection: The Emigrants/The New Land | Blu-ray Review

Following last summer’s restoration of Swedish auteur Jan Troell’s directorial debut Here is Your Life (1966), Criterion presents the director’s most notable accomplishment from his most prolific period, the one-two punch of The Emigrants (1971) and The New Land (1972). Though technically released as two distinct features, they are more of a conjoined saga detailing the travails of America’s Scandinavian ancestors. Richly attenuated, they’re adapted from the celebrated series of four novels by Vilhelm Moberg, Upon a Good Land, hailed as cornerstones of Swedish literature. Until now, these, along with most of Troell’s 1970s titles, (who is known best for his 2008 masterpiece, Everlasting Moments) have been largely unavailable, a pity considering the level of achievement and a handful of Academy Award nominations (including a Best Picture nod) between both features. It’s difficult to imagine a more authentic depiction of the early immigration experience, narratives which have
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Emigrants & The New Land

Jan Troell knocks us for a loop with his masterful epic of a Swedish farming family in the 1840s, making the big move to the promised green acres in frontier Minnesota. Max Von Sydow and Liv Ullmann are heartbreakingly deserving and hopeful; the dreamers and the devout and the intolerant come too. The two-film, six-hour saga is a faithful to history and politically neutral. The Emigrants / The New Land Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 796 & 797 1971-1972 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 191 + 202 min. / Utvandrarna & Nybyggarna / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 9, 2016 / 49.95 Starring Max von Sydow, Liv Ullmann, Eddie Axberg, Sven-Olof Bern, Aina Alfredsson, Allan Edwall, Monica Zetterlund, Pierre Lindstedt, Hans Alfredson, Ulla Smidje, Eva-Lena Zetterlund, Gustaf Faringborg. Cinematography and Editing Jan Troell Original Music Erik Nordgren /Bengt Ernryd, Georg Oddner Production design P.A. Lundgren Written by Bengt Forslund, Jan Troell from novels by Vilhelm Moberg Produced by Bengt Forslund Directed by Jan Troell
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Bergman's Final, Disturbing Masterwork About Religion, Power and Child Abuse

'Fanny and Alexander' movie: Ingmar Bergman classic with Bertil Guve as Alexander Ekdahl 'Fanny and Alexander' movie review: Last Ingmar Bergman 'filmic film' Why Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander / Fanny och Alexander bears its appellation is a mystery – one of many in the director's final 'filmic film' – since the first titular character, Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) is at best a third- or fourth-level supporting character. In fact, in the three-hour theatrical version she is not even mentioned by name for nearly an hour into the film. Fanny and Alexander should have been called "Alexander and Fanny," or simply "Alexander," since it most closely follows two years – from 1907 to 1909 – in the life of young, handsome, brown-haired Alexander Ekdahl (Bertil Guve), the original "boy who sees dead people." Better yet, it should have been called "The Ekdahls," for that whole family is central to the film, especially Fanny and Alexander's beautiful blonde mother Emilie,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wallander's Krister Henriksson: 'I'd like to play King Lear'

When Wallander actor Krister Henriksson memorised a downbeat Swedish novel, he didn't expect his efforts to produce a theatre smash hit. He tells Laura Barnett about playing the West End, his Shakespeare ambitions – and Scandi-mania

Eight years ago, actor Krister Henriksson was living in a hotel in the Swedish fishing village of Ystad, filming Wallander, when he came up with a novel way of spending the evenings. Not for him a nightly trip to the hotel bar or gorging on room service. Instead, he decided to dedicate his free time to memorising Doktor Glas, an experimental 1905 novel by the Swedish writer Hjalmar Söderberg.

"If you're living in a hotel for one and a half years," Henriksson tells me in his near-fluent, gruffly accented English, "you grow fatter. In Sweden, we call it 'the hotel death'. I got scared – I thought: 'I have to save my life. I have to do something.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Fanny And Alexander Criterion Blu-ray Review

Ingmar Bergman is one of the most respected names in cinema, which comes with a price. When in The Seventh Seal he had a knight and the embodiment of death play a chess game, he unfortunately crystallized what Americans feared was the nature of “Foreign Films.” They seemed pretentious and humorless, about suffering and existentialism. So it’s understandable if the body of work is approached with some hesitation. But – though it starts slowly – Fanny and Alexander, his 1982 farewell to directing cinema, begins with a Christmas celebration that features sex and fart jokes. Seriously, jokes plural. Our review of Criterion’s Blu-ray of Fanny and Alexander follows after the jump. Bertil Guve stars as Alexander Ekdahl, His parents act and run the local theater, and as the film begins they are finishing their Christmas show and going to dinner with the matriarch of their family Helena (Gunn Wallgren). There we meet the family.
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Fanny and Alexander Blu Ray Review

Fanny and Alexander Directed by: Ingmar Bergman Written by: Ingmar Bergman Starring: Börje Ahlstedt, Pernilla Allwin, Allan Edwall, Ewa Fröling, Bertil Guve I was faced with a dilemma when I finally sat down to watch Ingmar Bergman's epic 1982 family drama, Fanny and Alexander. Not unlike his "Scenes From a Marriage", Criterion's wonderful blu ray set contains two versions of the film: the 3 hour theatrical cut and the original five and a half hour TV miniseries. Which version do I watch? I've always hated being forced to make such choices and now that DVD and blu ray have afforded filmmakers the option to release various director's cuts and unrated versions, it seem to happen all too often. Luckily, this situation seemed a little more clear cut. Obviously if Bergman shot and released a five hour version, That was the complete version. So that's where I started. The first hour of
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Fanny And Alexander Review – d: Ingmar Bergman

Fanny Och Alexander / Fanny And Alexander (1982) Direction and Screenplay: Ingmar Bergman Cast: Pernilla Allwin, Bertil Guve, Ewa Fröling, Börje Ahlstedt, Jan Malmsjö, Allan Edwall, Gunn Wållgren, Jarl Kulle , Erland Josephson, Pernilla August, Harriet Andersson, Stina Ekblad, Mats Bergman, Gunnar Björnstrand, Lena Olin Oscar Movies Bertil Guve, Pernilla Allwin, Fanny and Alexander By Dan Schneider of Cosmoetica: Why Ingmar Bergman's final 'filmic film,' Fanny och Alexander / Fanny and Alexander (1982) bears its appellation is a mystery — one of many in the film — since the first titular character, Fanny (Pernilla Allwin) is at best a third- or fourth-level supporting character. In fact, in the three-hour theatrical version she is not even mentioned by name for nearly an hour into the film. Fanny and Alexander should have been called "Alexander and Fanny," or simply "Alexander," since it most closely follows two years in the life of young, handsome, brown-haired [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Sacrifice d: Andrei Tarkovsky

The Sacrifice (1986) Direction & Screenplay: Andrei Tarkovsky Cast: Erland Josephson, Susan Fleetwood, Tommy Kjellqvist, Allan Edwall, Gudún S. Gísladóttir, Sven Wollter, Valérie Mairesse By Dan Schneider of Cosmoetica: Watching Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky’s final work, Offret / The Sacrifice (1986), is an exercise in cinema appreciation. That’s not because The Sacrifice is a great film, but because it has great moments interspersed with moments of sheer boredom. In fact, The Sacrifice is one of those rare films that goes to the antipodes of what is good and bad in that art form. Overall, it’s worth seeing; but it is in no way, shape, or [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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