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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

1-20 of 29 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Francesca Eastwood: In Her Own Words [Exclusive Video]

15 April 2017 10:05 AM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Francesca Eastwood uBio ‘My First Film Role… by Uinterview Francesca Eastwood is an American reality television show personality and  actress. She is best known for staring in Mrs. Eastwood & Company along with her step-mother, siblings and other family members. This Francesca Eastwood bio will allow the actress to tell her story in her own words. […]

  Source: uInterview

The post Francesca Eastwood: In Her Own Words [Exclusive Video] appeared first on uInterview. »

- Catherine Valdez

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Francesca Eastwood Signs With Brillstein Entertainment Partners

28 March 2017 12:11 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Francesca Eastwood has signed with Brillstein Entertainment Partners for management. Eastwood starred in the SXSW festival film M.F.A. and was the lead actress in Outlaws and Angels alongside Luke Wilson and Chad Michael Murray, which premiered at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. She’ll next be seen in a starring role in Angie Wang's Cardinal X, which premieres next month, and the Dan Bush thriller The Vault opposite James Franco and Taryn Manning, which will be released… »

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SXSW 2017 Review Round-Up: M.F.A., Assholes, and Two Pigeons

21 March 2017 1:45 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

During the 2017 SXSW Film Festival, I had the opportunity to check out several movies on the fringe of the horror genre, including M.F.A., Assholes, and Two Pigeons, and you can read my thoughts on all three films right here:

M.F.A.: An uncomfortable and devastating exploration of the trauma that comes from rape and sexual violence, Natalie Leite’s M.F.A. punched a hole right through my soul. While rape is certainly an upsetting topic for most, writer Leah McKendrick’s approach to how the film’s protagonist, Noelle (the amazing Francesca Eastwood), handles her ordeal becomes something of a cinematic anthem of empowerment once the young woman takes matters into her own hands.

In M.F.A., we meet Noelle, who is completing the grad student program in Fine Arts, but she can’t seem to break past her own sense of mediocrity when it comes to creating her art. »

- Heather Wixson

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SXSW Film Review: ‘M.F.A.’

21 March 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Whatever its flaws, Natalia Leite’s “M.F.A.” certainly doesn’t suffer from timidity. Offering an unapologetically feminist, female-centric take on the oft-problematic (and oft-male-gaze-dominated) rape-revenge thriller genre, as well as addressing recent controversies over college campus assault in bold strokes, the film never shies away from righteous provocation.

As admirable as its aims may be, however, “M.F.A.’s” themes call for a careful, consistent tone that it is rarely able to maintain, and an increasingly ridiculous third act squanders much of the empathy and engagement that Leite works so hard to build in the early going. As a survivor-turned-avenger whose bloody campaigns against her own rapist and others’ become fuel for her art, Francesca Eastwood delivers a tough, eye-opening performance in the lead role, and her character’s vengeance packs a cathartic punch. But too much of the film fails to rise to her level.

Noelle (Eastwood) is a shy, »

- Andrew Barker

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Francesca Eastwood On ‘M.F.A.,’ SXSW, Sexual Assault, Dad Clint Eastwood [Video Exclusive]

20 March 2017 2:46 PM, PDT | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Francesca Eastwood On ‘M.F.A.,’ SXSW, Sexual… by Uinterview Actress Francesca Eastwood, daughter of Clint Eastwood, found a script that deeply resonated with her in the rape revenge film M.F.A. Directed by Natalia Leite, the movie stars Eastwood as Noelle in a visual arts student in an M.F.A. program. Noelle gets entangled with classmate Luke (Peter Vack). After Noelle […]

  Source: uInterview

The post Francesca Eastwood On ‘M.F.A.,’ SXSW, Sexual Assault, Dad Clint Eastwood [Video Exclusive] appeared first on uInterview. »

- Kate Chia

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SXSW 2017 Interview: Daily Dead Chats with the Filmmakers Behind M.F.A.

20 March 2017 12:43 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

In M.F.A., director Natalia Leite and writer/co-star Leah McKendrick effectively rip into the complexities of rape culture, specifically on college campuses, with their revenge thriller about an art student (Francesca Eastwood) whose frustrations mount when her school won’t do anything to help her after she’s attacked. Once Eastwood’s character, Noelle, realizes that she’s not the only who has suffered an injustice, she sets out to right the wrongs against herself and her fellow female classmates, taking out one abuser at a time.

While at the 2017 SXSW Film Festival, Daily Dead had the opportunity to speak with Leite, McKendrick, Eastwood, and producer Mike Manning about the project, their approach to the challenging material in M.F.A., and more.

I watched this movie and I have to admit it absolutely ripped my soul out. I’ve seen other rape revenge movies before, but the way you handled the »

- Heather Wixson

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SXSW Review — ‘M.F.A.’ Butchers Opportunity To Confront Sexual Assault

17 March 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

M.F.A.’ Butchers Opportunity To Confront the Realities of Sexual AssaultThe problematic SXSW title combines a severe mishandling of campus rape with a mediocre psychological thriller.

What could be worse than a fundamental misunderstanding of an issue as important and sensitive as campus rape? The answer, as provided by controversial SXSW title M.F.A., is to write a limp, cliched psychological thriller around it. It is difficult to report negatively about a film that focuses on sexual assault when so few films are brave enough to, but when it is handled as poorly and dangerously as it is here, it is important to address its problems head-on.

From its first moments, M.F.A. wastes no time in establishing its protagonist and the world in which she lives in. This is the story of Noelle (Francesca Eastwood), an art student working on her titular master’s degree at a fictional California university. Immediately, we are introduced to the ins and outs »

- Fernando Andrés

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‘Most Beautiful Island’ Review: Ana Asensio’s SXSW Winner Is a Spellbinding Thriller About Immigrant Life In America

15 March 2017 11:02 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A short, stressful, and utterly spellbinding debut that transforms the immigrant experience into the stuff of an early Polanski psychodrama, Ana Asensio’s “Most Beautiful Island” is a worthy winner of the SXSW Grand Jury Prize for best narrative feature, and — more importantly — strong evidence of a cinematic juggernaut in the making.

Asensio, a thirtysomething Spanish actress whose work is virtually unseen on these shores, not only wrote, directed, and produced this fraught metropolitan thriller, she also appears in just about every frame. And while the film might begin by suggesting that its heroine was chosen at random (a mesmeric prologue follows seven different women as they weave through the sidewalks of Manhattan, the camera picking them out of a crowd as if to wordlessly reassert that most of the Naked City’s seven million stories remain untold), Asensio’s compulsively watchable lead performance splits the difference between the specific and the representational. »

- David Ehrlich

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‘I’m Dying Up Here’ Review: Jim Carrey’s Overstuffed Take on Stand-Up Comedy Loses the Room — SXSW 2017

15 March 2017 10:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The dark side of stand-up comedy is always lurking behind the jokes, and “I’m Dying Up Here,” Showtime’s drama series set in Los Angeles’ ’70s comedy scene, aims to bring it to light. Tracking a group of comedians who work at a club on the Sunset strip, the first episode slowly teases a tragedy meant to tie all these stories together, even if the premiere feels unwieldy before every member of the large ensemble is introduced. An hour-long drama about the lives of comedians feels a tad antithetical even before you start counting expendable plot lines, but “I’m Dying Up Here” shows brief flashes of focused merit in its counter-intuitive take.

What works best among the many ingredients at play is first how producer Jim Carrey and showrunner David Flebotte highlight the serious side of a world made to look lighthearted. Second, and more simply, is Ari Graynor’s Cassie, »

- Ben Travers

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‘I’m Dying Up Here’ Review: Jim Carrey’s Overstuffed Take on Stand-Up Comedy Loses the Room — SXSW 2017

15 March 2017 10:29 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The dark side of stand-up comedy is always lurking behind the jokes, and “I’m Dying Up Here,” Showtime’s drama series set in Los Angeles’ ’70s comedy scene, aims to bring it to light. Tracking a group of comedians who work at a club on the Sunset strip, the first episode slowly teases a tragedy meant to tie all these stories together, even if the premiere feels unwieldy before every member of the large ensemble is introduced. An hour-long drama about the lives of comedians feels a tad antithetical even before you start counting expendable plot lines, but “I’m Dying Up Here” shows brief flashes of focused merit in its counter-intuitive take.

What works best among the many ingredients at play is first how producer Jim Carrey and showrunner David Flebotte highlight the serious side of a world made to look lighthearted. Second, and more simply, is Ari Graynor’s Cassie, »

- Ben Travers

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‘M.F.A.’ Review: Francesca Eastwood Breaks Out in This Unfocused Rape-Revenge Drama — SXSW 2017

15 March 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Even amongst the creative weirdos in her visual arts M.F.A. program, Noelle (Francesca Eastwood) doesn’t quite fit in. She’s a little too restrained, a little too quiet, and her work could benefit from a serious injection of fresh blood — and all that changes when she’s the victim of a terrible act of violence. On the heels of Isabelle Huppert’s lauded turn in Paul Verhoeven’s similarly themed “Elle,” Natalia Leite’s “M.F.A.” is another entry in the rape-revenge genre, with Eastwood’s daring performance emerging as the most compelling element.

“Get messy! Fail! Fail miserably! Make something ugly!” Humiliating Noelle in front of her steely-eyed classmates, her professor (Marlon Young) admonishes the young artist after yet another poor showing. Despite a talent for drawing and painting, Noelle just can’t seem to tap into a creative well, and both her work and her personal energies are suffering because of it. »

- Kate Erbland

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SXSW 2017 Award Winners: ‘Most Beautiful Island’ and ‘The Work’ Win Jury Competition Prizes

14 March 2017 7:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

At a packed Paramount Theater this evening, the SXSW Film Festival, now at the halfway mark, handed out their big film awards. The fest’s two big competition jury prizes went to director Ana Asensio’s “Most Beautiful Island” (Best Narrative Feature) and directors Jairus McLeary and Gethin Aldous’s “The Work” (Best Narrative Feature).

Read More: Terrence Malick Makes a Rare Appearance at SXSW 2017 and Digs Deep On His Process

Asensio, a Spanish actress and filmmaker living in New York, shot her film in super 16mm. It tells the story of undocumented female immigrants struggling to start a life in New York. It is a feature film debut for Asensio, who also stars and wrote the screenplay. “Island” is being billed as a dramatic thriller and was produced by the New York horror master Larry Fessenden’s Glass Eye Pix.

The Doc Prize winner, “The Work,” is an intense »

- Chris O'Falt

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‘Muppet Guys Talking’ Review: Frank Oz’s Doc Is a Loving Tribute to the Creative Spirit (And Muppets) — SXSW 2017

14 March 2017 2:46 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Filmed in 2012 but proving timeless, Frank Oz’s loving and free-wheeling “Muppet Guys Talking: Secrets Behind the Show the Whole World Watched” is a must-see not only for Muppet fans and the people who made them, but for anyone seeking insight into the power of creativity.

Its title is nearly longer than its 65-minute runtime, but that’s a fine length for a doc that plays like a snappy conversation between pals. Oz assembled said “Muppet Guys” (Oz plus Muppet maestros Jerry Nelson, Dave Goelz, Fran Brill, and Bill Barretta) for an unprecedented gabfest, all filmed and assembled into a satisfying inside look at the people behind (and sometimes under) the world’s most beloved puppets. In his introduction, Oz promises a look at “the spirit of The Muppets,” and “Muppet Guys Talking” delivers on that claim.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire SXSW Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted »

- Kate Erbland

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Noël Wells Reflects on Her Buzzy SXSW Debut and Career Post-‘Saturday Night Live’: ‘It’s Actually More Rock ’N’ Roll’

14 March 2017 2:39 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every comedian worth their weight in cheap motels has a “Saturday Night Live” rejection story, it’s only after their careers take off that anyone cares to hear them. In an interview with Vanity Fair, “Master of None” star Noël Wells had some choice words for the comedy giant, whom she calls “Comedy dinosaurs.”

Read More: SXSW 2017: 10 Talents Poised to Break Out At This Year’s Festival

“’S.N.L.’ is the comedy establishment,” said Wells, promoting her directorial debut which she also wrote and stars in, “Mr. Roosevelt” at SXSW.

“Of course you want to go through that, because you want that stamp of approval. But it has its own identity, and our voices didn’t mesh for whatever reason—or they decided we didn’t belong. I think a lot of us would have liked to keep trying and have our own voices shine through. For whatever reason, »

- Jude Dry

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‘The Relationtrip’ Review: In This Modestly Clever Comedy, The Rom-Com Gets Weird — SXSW 2017

14 March 2017 2:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You’ve seen this all before, and that’s the cheery joke driving C.A. Gabriel and Renee Felice Smith’s amusing feature directorial debut, “The Relationtrip.” Clearly a passion project for the real-life couple, the pair wrote, directed, and produced the film, with Smith also stepping in front of the camera for one of the film’s lead roles. (Gabriel also composed music for the feature.) A wicked spin on the often played-out world of indie romantic comedies, “The Relationtrip” packs every conceivable genre trope into a neat 90 minutes, and then happily upends them.

Beck (Smith) and Liam (Matt Bush) are typical La hipsters — he does something with video games, she works in a cafe, they meet at a “salon de music” held in someone’s living room. After their awkward meet-cute, Liam and Beck take to a taco truck to get to know each other better, and while alternately »

- Kate Erbland

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‘The Most Hated Woman in America’ Review: Melissa Leo Stars in a Painfully Unfocused True Crime Story — SXSW 2017

14 March 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A militant defender of the 1st Amendment, Madalyn Murray O’Hair founded the American Atheists organization in 1963 after using her young son William as an opportunity to sue the Baltimore City Public School System, an effort that eventually reached the Supreme Court and effectively led to the end of mandatory Bible prayers in the nation’s education system. William, who now goes by the name Bill Murray, would grow up to become a Baptist minister — today, he serves as the chairman of the Religious Freedom Coalition, his life devoted to reversing the kind of secular progressivism that thrust his mother into the national spotlight.

Pulled taut between the disparate forces of fame and freedom, this is a uniquely American story that’s rich with relevant detail, tantalizingly sordid even before you get to the part where Madalyn is kidnapped from her Austin home in 1995, abducted alongside her underachieving son and Bill’s estranged daughter. »

- David Ehrlich

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‘Residente’ Review: This Hybrid Music Doc From Latin America’s Beloved Hip-Hop Star Bursts With Life — SXSW 2017

14 March 2017 1:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If music be the food of love, the world needs a boatload right about now and pop music ain’t gonna cut it. That’s the sentiment of René Pérez Joglar, the Puerto Rican rapper more commonly known as Residente, as well as co-founder and lead singer of Calle 13, an alternative hip-hop group beloved across Latin America. (Say “Calle 13″ to a Latino person, and you’ll see a face light up.) Joglar has won 25 Grammy Awards, the most ever awarded to a Latin artist. Calle 13 is known for its satirical lyrics that often provide social commentary about Latin American issues, and Joglar is a decorated humanitarian, receiving the Nobel Peace Summit Award in 2015 for his commitment to social justice.

Read More: ‘Dara Ju’ Review: Anthony Onah’s Debut Is a Vital But Unfocused Drama About Immigrant Identity in America

What better way to combine his passions of »

- Jude Dry

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‘The Work’ Is the Most Powerful Group Therapy Session Ever Caught on Camera — SXSW 2017 Review

14 March 2017 1:26 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Imagine a Tony Robbins session with a bunch of testosterone-fueled convicts and you’ll start to get an idea of “The Work,” an emotionally riveting documentary that may very well be the most powerful group therapy ever caught on camera. Co-directors Jairus McLeary and Gethin Aldous gained access to a tense four-day session at Folsom State Prison, where inmates engage with civilians in intimate conversations about their repressed frustrations. Scene by scene, their masculine armor falls away, and the tears erupt with volcanic intensity. The minimalist scenario, almost exclusively set within the confines of a nondescript room, foregrounds the visceral process of confronting anger and regret through a fascinating collaborative approach, with results that are alternately terrifying and cathartic.

The Work” captures one of two annual sessions in which male prisoners and civilians joining together in close quarters to talk through their greatest fears and traumatic memories. While this initially »

- Eric Kohn

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‘Review’ Review: One of TV’s Best Comedies Kicks Off Its Farewell Season with Some Greatest Hits

14 March 2017 9:04 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

If comedy really equals tragedy plus time, Forrest MacNeil might be the funniest character in TV history. He’s been shot, stabbed, buried, framed, arrested, even lost at sea – and that was just from a handful of episodes in Season 2.

As the show-within-a-show “Review” soldiers on in the wake of a highly improbable return (viewers may remember Forrest and his producer Grant careening off of a suspension bridge in the Season 2 finale), Comedy Central has announced that this latest batch of episodes will be its last. So, what to do when your show seemingly has nowhere else to escalate after a murder, a cult-inspired bloodbath and a months-long missing persons case? Luckily for us, Andy Daly and the entire cast and crew of “Review” are back in rare form, putting Forrest back through the ringer with the same trademark brand of blissfully cringe-inducing adventures.

For those worried that a jump »

- Steve Greene

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‘I Love Bekka & Lucy’ Review: Piquant Web Series Presents a Relationship Choice Worth Considering — SXSW 2017

13 March 2017 6:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The idea of finding happiness in platonic friendship rather than romantic love isn’t exactly a new concept. But what makes “I Love Bekka & Lucy” feel fresh (and addictively fun) is that no matter how deeply series’ writer and director Rachael Holder deconstructs the argument, love never leaves the equation. You feel it in every scene, in complex, ever-evolving shades, and thus we learn along with Bekka and Lucy whether or not the proposed lifestyle would or wouldn’t work — for them and for the rest of us.

Everyone, at some point in their life, dreams of living the rest of their days with their best friend, free from the drama, frustrations, and various other forms of emotional turmoil associated with falling in love. Sometimes there’s even times when these desires coincide, and for a few precious months or years, domestic life is nothing but a comfort.

Read More: »

- Ben Travers

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

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