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Colcoa Announces Focus on a Filmmaker and Classics Program

From April 20 to April 28, 2015, filmgoers will celebrate the 19th edition of Colcoa French Film Festival, "9 Days of Film Premieres in Hollywood." The festival has recently unveiled the Focus on a Filmmaker program as well as an exclusive line up of French Classics of predominantly digitally restored films, presented as World, International or North American Premieres. All screenings will take place at the Directors Guild of America. For the first time, the Colcoa Classics Series from Tuesday to Saturday will be free with no reservation, on a first come, first served, basis.

Focus on a Filmmaker: Academy Award-Winner Michel Hazanavicius

Colcoa will honor Academy Award-winning writer-director Michel Hazanavicius on Thursday, April 23 with a special encore presentation of "Oss 117 Cairo Nest of Spies" (2006) (Colcoa Classics), as well as the Los Angeles Premiere of his new film , three years after the triumph of multi-Academy Award- winner, "The Artist." The cast of "The Search" includes Academy Award Nominee Bérénice Bejo and Academy Award nominee AAnnette Bening . "The Search" had its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival last year. Hazanavicius joins writer-directors Cedric Klapisch, Bertrand Blier, Costa Gavras, Florent Siri, Julie Delpy and Alain Resnais, whose key body of work has been cited in past festivals. This will be his third film presented at the festival, following "Oss 117 Cairo Nest of Spies" and the International Premiere of "Oss 117, Lost in Rio." Michel Hazanavicius will meet the audience for a Happy Hour Talk panel dedicated to his work. (Colcoa Classics + Panel + Premiere of "The Search.")

30th Anniversary of Palme D'Or Winner "Paris,Texas"

The digitally restored version of French production "Paris,Texas" (1984) will have its West Coast Premiere at Colcoa. The Cannes Palme d'Or winner, co-written by Sam Shepard and L.M. Kit Carson, and directed by Academy Award Nominee Wim Wenders, will be presented in association with Argos Films and Janus Films. The cast includes Nastassja Kinski who will present the film, Harry Dean Stanton and Dean Stockwell. (Colcoa Classics)

  

North American Premiere of Digitally Restored "La Chienne"

Colcoa will present the digitally restored version of "La Chienne" (1931), the second talking movie co-written and directed by Jean Renoir. It stars Michel Simon, Janie Marèse and Georges Flamant. This exclusive new presentation in the U.S. is made possible thanks to the Franco-American Cultural Fund (Facf), Janus Films La Cinémathèque Française and Les Films du Jeudi. (Colcoa Classics)

World Premiere of Digitally Restored "Will It Snow for Christmas?" 

A special 20th anniversary screening of digitally restored "Will It Snow for Christmas?" (1996) will be offered to the Colcoa audience. The film, written and directed by Sandrine Veysset, starring Dominique Reymond, Daniel Duval and Jessica Martinez, will be presented for the first time in advance of a U.S. release by Carlotta Films. (Colcoa Classics)  

First American Presentation Since 1961 "Five Day Lover"

This romantic comedy by the late writer-director Philippe de Broca, starring Jean-Pierre Cassel François Périer, Jean Seberg and Micheline Presle, will be presented in an American theatre for the first time since its opening in 1961. Colcoa will present the digitally restored version of "Five Day Lover" as a World Premiere. The Cohen Media Group will release the film later this year in the U.S.. (Colcoa Classics) World Premiere of Digitally Restored "Two Men in Town"

A classic film noir written and directed by José Giovanni, starring Alain Delon and Jean Gabin, "Two Men in Town"(1973) will be presented for the first time on the big screen in a digitally restored version. The Cohen Media group will release the film later this year (Colcoa Classics). North American Premiere of Digitally Restored "The Last Metro"

Following last year's homage to the universally renowned François Truffaut, Colcoa is proud to offer the North American Premiere of the digitally restored "The Last Metro" (1980), presented in association with the Franco-American Cultural Fund, La Cinématheque Française, MK2 and Janus Films. This masterpiece was also Truffaut's most successful box office success. It stars Catherine Deneuve and Gerard Depardieu. (Colcoa Classics
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

5 Underseen Apocalypse Movies To Accompany 'Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World'

Apocalypse is an ever-popular idea in cinema. After all, what could be more dramatic than the possibility -- or even the actuality -- of the end of everyone and everything that you've ever known. It's an all purpose metaphor, and can be used to tell all kinds of stories, in all kinds of tones, as highlighted by this weekend's comedy-drama "Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World," which sees Steve Carell and Keira Knightley brought together by the impending end of civilization.

The film's only semi-successful at melding romantic comedy with the end of days, as you'll find from our review, but there's plenty in the film to recommend it as well. And if you're still looking for a little more end-of-the-world drama, we've picked out five lesser-known examples that are worth seeking out Asap. Check out our selections below, and let us know your own favorites in the comments section.
See full article at The Playlist »

Competition: Win French crime thriller 'Gang Story' on DVD

To celebrate the DVD release of Olivier Marchal's gritty French crime thriller Gang Story (Les Lyonnais, 2011) - which stars Gérard Lanvin, Tchéky Karyo and Daniel Duval - on 23 April, the fabulous guys and gals at Organic Marketing have kindly provided us with an amazing Five DVD copies of the film to give away to our gangster-tripping admirers. This is an exclusive competition for our Facebook fans, so if you haven't already, head over to facebook.com/CineVueUK, 'Like' us, and then follow the instructions below.

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See full article at CineVue »

Weinstein Co. Looks To Pick Up A Gang Story

Director Olivier Marchal continued to build his reputation as France’s master of thrillers and his fourth film A Gang Story looks to be heading to U.S. art houses. Variety reported that The Weinstein Co. continued talks to acquire domestic theatrical distribution rights to A Gang Story, to be released in France as Le Gang des Lyonnais. Marchal co-wrote the film with Edgar Marie and follows gang leader Edmond Vidal (Gérard Lanvin) nicknamed Mormon, as he reflects back on his younger days, the rise of his Lyon-based gang and his frequent clashes with police. Marcal shot his fourth film in Lyon with Gérard Lanvin, Daniel Duval, Dimitri Storoge as the younger Vidal, Valeria Cavalli, Stéphane Caillard, Patrick Catalifo and Tchéky Karyo in the cast.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Weinstein Co. Looks To Pick Up A Gang Story

Director Olivier Marchal continued to build his reputation as France’s master of thrillers and his fourth film A Gang Story looks to be heading to U.S. art houses. Variety reported that The Weinstein Co. continued talks to acquire domestic theatrical distribution rights to A Gang Story, to be released in France as Le Gang des Lyonnais. Marchal co-wrote the film with Edgar Marie and follows gang leader Edmond Vidal (Gérard Lanvin) nicknamed Mormon, as he reflects back on his younger days, the rise of his Lyon-based gang and his frequent clashes with police. Marcal shot his fourth film in Lyon with Gérard Lanvin, Daniel Duval, Dimitri Storoge as the younger Vidal, Valeria Cavalli, Stéphane Caillard, Patrick Catalifo and Tchéky Karyo in the cast.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Weinstein Co. Looks To Pick Up A Gang Story

Director Olivier Marchal continued to build his reputation as France’s master of thrillers and his fourth film A Gang Story looks to be heading to U.S. art houses. Variety reported that The Weinstein Co. continued talks to acquire domestic theatrical distribution rights to A Gang Story, to be released in France as Le Gang des Lyonnais. Marchal co-wrote the film with Edgar Marie and follows gang leader Edmond Vidal (Gérard Lanvin) nicknamed Mormon, as he reflects back on his younger days, the rise of his Lyon-based gang and his frequent clashes with police. Marcal shot his fourth film in Lyon with Gérard Lanvin, Daniel Duval, Dimitri Storoge as the younger Vidal, Valeria Cavalli, Stéphane Caillard, Patrick Catalifo and Tchéky Karyo in the cast.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Blu-Ray Review: ‘District 13: Ultimatum’ Falls Short of Predecessor

Chicago – Parkour is a type of physical discipline well suited for the cinema. It trains mere mortals to move like supermen. They can leap from one place to another, while overcoming formidable obstacles, without the need for any harnesses or special effects. The only tools used by parkour practitioners are their own bodies and their surrounding environment. Buster Keaton would’ve excelled at this.

I first discovered parkour upon my viewing of the original 2004 French thriller, “District B13,” which featured two spectacular athletes, Cyril Raffaelli and David Belle, performing the majority of their stunts. The film was terrific popcorn entertainment, blending crowd-pleasing action with a sobering political message, achieving an overall impact similar to Neill Blomkamp’s wholly unrelated “District 9.” Though its plot has often been compared to “Escape from New York,” the titular ghetto in “District B13” felt much more grounded in reality. Yet the film’s fight
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Review: 'District 13: Ultimatum'

  • Comicmix
In 2004, action fans were introduced to a brand new style of stunt work, an acrobatic, athletic style called parkour. One of its creators, David Belle, showed off his stuff in District 13, which benefited from being written and produced by Luc Besson and directed by Pierre Morel.

Set in the near future of 2010, the French film showed Paris in economic and societal decay with District 13 being overrun by gangs. Rather than deal with the problem the ineffective police wind up building a wall around the ghetto, isolating its two million residents.

The combination of action, adventure, and contemporary issues turned it into a success both in Europe and America. Morel went on to make a domestic thriller, Taken, and skipped returning to the inevitable sequel, District 13: Ultimatum. The film was released last year and is out this week on Blu-ray from Magnet Home Entertainment.

The story, also co-written and produced by Besson,
See full article at Comicmix »

'District 13: Ultimatum' review (3/5). Power to the people

You know what's soooo 2004? Parkour. Yes, the urban free-running art form that dazzled fans and haters alike when it made its splash with the 2004 film "District 13," and then really cooked things up in the opening sequence of the James Bond reboot "Casino Royale." But that was then. This is now. Although six years have passed in real life, only two of them have gone by since Leito (David Belle) and Damien (Cyril Raffaelli) cleaned up the drug dealers in the alt.Paris that was set in 2010. So regardless of real life, no sequel to "District 13" would be complete without some serious parkour from Belle, its founding father. Happily, Patrick Alessandrin's follow-up to "Taken" helmer Pierre Morel's original isn't a carbon copy. No, the other thing that was going on back in '04 was that drugs were bad. Not that they aren't bad now, but we're collectively
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

HollywoodChicago.com Hookup: 50 ‘District 13: Ultimatum’ Chicago Passes to Martial Arts Sequel

Chicago – In our latest drama edition of HollywoodChicago.com Hookup: Film, we have 20 admit-two passes up for grabs to the advance Chicago screening of “District 13: Ultimatum”! The film stars Cyril Raffaelli, David Belle, Philippe Torreton, Daniel Duval, Elodie Yung, James Deano, Laouni Mouhid, Fabrice Feltzinger and Pierre-Marie Mosconi.

District 13: Ultimatum” is the sequel to the popular martial arts thriller “District B13”.

To win your free pass to the advance Chicago screening of “District 13: Ultimatum” courtesy of HollywoodChicago.com, just answer our question below. That’s it! This screening will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. in Chicago. Directions to enter this Hookup and immediately win can be found beneath the graphic below.

The movie poster for “District 13: Ultimatum”.

Image credit: Magnet Releasing

Here is the “District 13: Ultimatum” plot description:

Two years have passed since elite police officer
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Banlieue 13: Ultimatum (2009) Movie Review

It’s been three years since the events of “Banlieue 13”, and the more things change, the more they stay the same. Or gotten worst, actually. The wall that separates the slums of District 13 and the more civilized (i.e. less tattooed) populace of Paris has not been torn down as promised, and the alleyways are still choking with violent gangs, separated into different Ak-toting factions. The residents of the slums have a ceasefire with the cops, but that’s about to change when a third party led by sleazy Government official Gassman (Daniel Duval) enters the picture, determined to instigate an all-out civil war designed to bring down District 13 once and for all. It’s up to nomadic District 13 warrior Leito (David Belle) and supercop Damien (Cyril Raffaelli) to save the day. Of course, that’s just become a tad more difficult when a frame
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

Priceless' Salvadori gives 'Full Treatment' towards Tautou

[/link]'s main muse, but Audrey Tautou has forged a new working relationship with comedy helmer Pierre Salvadori. After pairing on the box office darling Priceless (Hors de Prix) where it made plenty of Euros in profits in France and made a whopping over 2 million dollars in receipts for Samuel Goldwyn Films in its domestic run, the two will come together on a new romantic comedy which is also starring Nathalie Baye and Sami Bouajila. Co-written by Salvadori and Benoît Graffin, Soins Complets (Full Treatment) centres on a hair salon manager (Tautou) unable to help her mother (Baye), who has been feeling depressed since her husband left her. But the young woman receives an anonymous love letter which gives her an idea: she changes the name of the address and puts that of her mother's instead. This plan works almost too well: her mother recovers
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Jean de la Fontaine, le defi

Jean de la Fontaine, le defi
PARIS -- Suddenly, France's classical age is in fashion. "Jean de la Fontaine, le defi" ("le defi" means "the challenge") is the second film about a 17th century cultural icon to appear this year, and director Daniel Vigne's portrayal of the willful poet and fabulist inevitably will be compared with "Moliere", the highly successful portrait of the dramatist as a young man released here in January.

Where the earlier costume drama essentially is a lighthearted comic romp, Vigne -- director of the medieval mystery tale "The Return of Martin Guerre" -- aims to pack a thin story with contemporary relevance. The results are diverting but unfocused, and "Fontaine" is unlikely to play as well at the boxoffice.

When the young Louis XIV (Jocelyn Quivrin) ascends to the throne in 1661 and axes the chief minister Fouquet (Nicky Naude) to replace him with his personal favorite Colbert (Philippe Torreton), the air is thick with the turning of coats.

But Fouquet's protege Jean de la Fontaine (Lorant Deutsch), a dreamy, insouciant poet who at 35 has yet to prove himself as a writer, springs to his defense. He denounces his drinking partners Moliere (Julien Courbey) and the tragedian Jean Racine (Romain Rondeau) for their supine indifference to a flagrant injustice and launches a campaign for the release of the imprisoned ex-minister.

He is blackballed for his pains, and the campaign achieves nothing other than to mark him as a troublemaker in the eyes of the ruthless Colbert.

In the process, though, La Fontaine has honed his writing skills. In particular, he develops and perfects the ancient form of the animal fable, using it as a vehicle for a series of satirical portraits of an increasingly conformist society. His pithy one-liners soon are all the rage. He plans to have his fables published in book form, for which he will need the king's authorization.

Being personable, good-looking and well-connected, La Fontaine finds no shortage of ladies of noble lineage willing to offer him food and board, though sometimes he has to wait on tables. But he's more at home among the people. For love interest, he dallies with Perrette (Sara Forestier), the tavern serving girl who seeks to better herself by learning to read.

The movie wends its amiable way to La Fontaine's predictable vindication with just enough incident to keep the spectator interested, notably the arrival of Colbert's hitman Terron (Daniel Duval), who challenges the poet to a duel to which there can be only one outcome but is foiled by the arrival by a group of La Fontaine's lowlife friends.

There is pathos in his midnight confrontation with Racine, whom he accuses of acting "no better than a dog, eating out of the king's hand." But too often in such exchanges the dialogue is overly schematic as the filmmakers hammer home their point about the need for artists to maintain their independence.

The film makes good use of France's heritage locations. As a historical political thriller, it has its moments but fails to thrill. However, the closing scenes provide a convincing visual metaphor for the steady drift under the Sun King to what was to become the prototype of a totalitarian regime.

JEAN DE LA FONTAINE, LE DEFI

Cineteve, France 2 Television

Credits:

Director: Daniel Vigne

Screenwriter: Jacques Forgeas

Producers: Philippe Rey, Fabienne Servan Schreiber

Executive producer: Jean-Pierre Fayer

Director of photography: Flore Thuillez

Production designer: Regis Nicolino

Music: Michel Portal

Costume designer: Florence Sadaune

Editor: Thierry Simonnet

Cast:

Jean de la Fontaine: Lorant Deutsch

Colbert: Philippe Torreton

Perrette: Sara Forestier

Chateauneuf: Jean-Claude Dreyfus

Moliere: Julien Courbey

Louis XIV: Jocelyn Quivrin

Terron: Daniel Duval

Racine: Romain Rondeau

Duchesse d'Orleans: Fabienne Babe

Jannart: Jean-Pierre Malo

Fouquet: Nicky Naude

Running time -- 100 minutes

No MPAA rating

Miou-Miou in 'Temps'

Miou-Miou in 'Temps'
PARIS -- French actress Miou-Miou will star in the new film Les Temps de Porte-Plum (The Time of the Pen-Holder) with actor-director Daniel Duval, a spokesman for Duval said Thursday. Set in the 1950s, Porte-Plume is about a young girl brought up by local social service authorities until she is taken in by a couple of modest means, played by Miou-Miou and actor Jacques Villeret. The largely autobiographical tale will be shot in the French region of Allier, where Duval was raised under similar circumstances. The film, to be released in 2005, reunites the two French stars 24 years after Duval's controversial Memoirs of a French Whore, in which he played the pimp boyfriend of a woman forced into prostitution (Miou-Miou).

Film review: 'Snow for Christmas'

This moving tale of a loving woman and her seven illegitimate children, set on a farm in the south of France, is strongly realized by debut filmmaker Sandrine Veysset, who engrossingly captures the everyday pains and pleasures of rural living. Thirty-year-old Veysset won the Cesar for best debut of 1996 and one looks forward to her work in the future.

A tough sell in the domestic market but a natural for further playdates in international film festivals, the subtitled "Will It Snow for Christmas?" screened Saturday as part of the festival called City of Lights, City of Angels: A Week of New French Films, at the Directors Guild of America. Writer-director Veysset was in attendance.

Stage actress Dominique Reymond delivers an unforgettable performance as the loyal but inwardly suffering lover of a difficult man (Daniel Duval) who keeps her and their kids as indentured servants while living in town with his wife and legitimate offspring.

She works very hard and rarely complains, as do all but the youngest of her children. Despite the rewards of the healthy, relatively uncomplicated lifestyle, their situation is nonetheless dismal as the father demands obedience, rewards them little and denies them such basics of modern life as an indoor toilet and central heating.

Early on, the mother justifies their situation as the best they can hope for, but she confronts the father over his bossiness and lack of compassion. In a leisurely fashion the film unfolds with scenes of farm work and group activities. Although the father is a villain of literary dimensions, the scenario does not demonize him.

Still, he's a harsh critic and threatens the mother with dire consequences should she leave the farm. When he makes a pass at the oldest daughter, however, the mother is badly shaken. As a lonely Christmas approaches, she veers toward the unthinkable. In a stunning, briefly unsettling conclusion, hope for the future is renewed.

Filmed in nine weeks in three seasons, with the principal actors living much like their on-screen counterparts, "Will It Snow for Christmas?" is convincing and avoids melodrama. Veysset and cinematographer Helene Louvart achieve the immediacy of a documentary and revel in striking compositions that evoke the works of such Gallic cinema masters as Jean Renoir, Claude Berri, Marcel Pagnol and Yves Robert.

WILL IT SNOW FOR CHRISTMAS?

Ognon Pictures

Writer-director Sandrine Veysset

Producer Humbert Balsan

Cinematographer Helene Louvart

Production designer Jacques Dubus

Editor Nelly Quettier

Sound Didier Sain

Color/stereo

Cast:

The Mother Dominique Reymond

The Father Daniel Duval

Running time -- 90 minutes

No MPAA rating

See also

Credited With | External Sites