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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2003

1-20 of 74 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Awakenings, part 1 by Anne-Katrin Titze

24 November 2014 2:24 PM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

The Sleepwalker director/writer Mona Fastvold and co-writer/actor Brady Corbet: "Yes, juxtapositions are what we've been looking for." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Director/writer Mona Fastvold and co-writer/actor Brady Corbet of The Sleepwalker, starring Gitte Witt, Christopher Abbott, Stephanie Ellis and Corbet, connect Michael Haneke's Caché and Funny Games, in which Corbet starred with Naomi Watts, Tim Roth and Michael Pitt, to Ingmar Bergman's Hour Of The Wolf and Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris. We discussed Borderline Films' productions of Sean Durkin's Martha Marcy May Marlene and Simon Killer by Antonio Campos and how it began for Corbet. Lars von Trier's love of Douglas Sirk and Melancholia led the discussion to the films of Claire Denis, Bruno Dumont, Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne. Scarlett Johansson's performance in Jonathan Glazer's Under The Skin in contrast to an Aki Kaurismäki film conjures up choices for all filmmakers to consider. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Mar del Plata Fest Mixes Auteurs, New Talent, Looks to Build Industry Heft

17 November 2014 1:57 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Some things don’t change. Graced by Viggo Mortensen and Paul Schrader, the International Competition jury prexy, Argentina’s 29th Mar del Plata Festival will bow Nov. 22 with Abel Ferrara’s “Pasolini.”

Its choice as Mar del Plata’s opening night movie is pretty well a declaration of principles that Latin America’s only “A” grade festival will go on through thick and thin – and, with only 29 editions in 60 years, there’s been much of both – to forefront latest titles from and here even about heavyweight auteurs.

That is not necessary If Variety’s reviewers are to go by, 2014 in general has caught some of the great auteurs in world cinema at the top of their game. If Cannes Festival sales had any narrative this year, it was how fast its big art film winners sold – think “Leviathan,” “Winter Sleep” – compared to bigger budget U.S. indie projects.

Adding cache »

- John Hopewell

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Viennale 2014 Review: Bruno Dumont Reinvents Himself and The Possibilities Of TV-Series In His Li'l Quinquin

27 October 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

In a mesmerizing and totally unexpected move French filmmaker Bruno Dumont has reinvented not only himself but also the crime-genre and the format of television series. In his Li'l Quinquin which has been astonishing critics since its premiere at this year's Director's Fortnight in Cannes Dumont explores a fascinating urge into aggressive humor and surreal exaggeration. The series which was originally produced for French/German television station arte consists of four parts that were presented in one screening (320 minutes) at the Viennale. At the core of the story lies a classical murder mystery which will lead into a whodunit. It is just that the serious story Dumont tells is loaded with preposterous figures, slapstick scenes and a hilarious over-the-topness. Nevertheless one can sense a spiritual...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Bouchareb receives Adff honour, talks career

25 October 2014 1:42 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

French-Algerian filmmaker and producer Rachid Bouchareb, who is being honoured with a career achievement award at the Abu Dhabi Film Festival, talked extensively about his career at a special ‘in conversation’ event.

Born to Algerian parents who moved to Paris just after the Second World War, twice Oscar-nominated filmmaker Rachid Bouchareb recounted how he was originally destined to work in manufacturing like his father.

“I was sitting at work one day when I decided to call the offices of a local broadcaster. I got through to a receptionist who I asked ‘how do people get into cinema’. She had more important things to do than talk to me but she gave me some names of schools nonetheless,” said Bouchareb, who would go onto make his first feature Bâton Rouge in 1985 with the support of the late producer Humbert Balsan.

The director, whose best known credits include Oscar-nominated Days of Glory and Outside the Law as well as »

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Bouchareb receives Adff honour, talks career

25 October 2014 1:42 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

French-Algerian filmmaker and producer Rachid Bouchareb, who is being honoured with a career achievement award at the Abu Dhabi Film Festival, talked extensively about his career at a special ‘in conversation’ event.

Born to Algerian parents who moved to Paris just after the Second World War, twice Oscar-nominated filmmaker Rachid Bouchareb recounted how he was originally destined to work in manufacturing like his father.

“I was sitting at work one day when I decided to call the offices of a local broadcaster. I got through to a receptionist who I asked ‘how do people get into cinema’. She had more important things to do than talk to me but she gave me some names of schools nonetheless,” said Bouchareb, who would go onto make his first feature Bâton Rouge in 1985 with the support of the late producer Humbert Balsan.

The director, whose best known credits include Oscar-nominated Days of Glory and Outside the Law as well as »

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Daily | Viennale 2014

24 October 2014 8:57 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The Viennale is off and running through November 6 and, as Patrick Holzapfel notes at Twitch, there'll be "around 150 feature films and documentaries. Among the highlights are P'tit Quinquin by Bruno Dumont, Winter Sleep by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, From What Is Before by Lav Diaz, Jauja by Lisandro Alonso, Birdman by Alejandro González Iñárritu, Hard to Be a God by Aleksei German or Pasolini by Abel Ferrara…. Further highlights are tributes to the actor Viggo Mortensen, the director Tariq Teguia, the late filmmaker Harun Farocki (who passed away sadly this summer), the work of Fritz Kortner and a special hommage to Jean-Luc Godard." » - David Hudson »

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Daily | In the Works | Argento, Loach, Tavernier

15 October 2014 4:40 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup of interesting projects that have been announced in the past week or so: Iggy Pop and Dario Argento are collaborating on an adaptation of E.T.A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman"; an interactive documentary on Ken Loach is in the works; Bertrand Tavernier is working on a personal exploration of French cinema; Bruno Dumont is open to the idea of a second season for P'tit Quinquin; Scarlett Johansson is will star in and executive produce an eight-episode adaptation of Edith Wharton's 1913 novel The Custom of the Country; Stephen Sondheim is at work on a new musical with the playwright David Ives (Venus in Fur) based on two renowned films by Luis Buñuel, El ángel exterminador and Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie; and more. » - David Hudson »

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Interview: Bruno Dumont on his 'Camille Claudel 1915'

13 October 2014 12:41 PM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

French director Bruno Dumont's Camille Claudel 1915 (2013), which premièred at last year's Berlin Film Festival, sees Juliette Binoche take the lead as the famous French artist and lover of Auguste Rodin. The main thrust of Dumont's latest sees Camille placed by her brother, the Catholic poet Paul Claudel (Jean-Luc Vincent), in a remote mental institution where she remained for 30 years up until her death. Here, Dumont constructs a stripped-down formal universe that bends not inwards to his tragic heroine, but pushes her outwards towards transcendental hopelessness and an easy acceptance of her desperate situation. Earlier this year we caught up with Dumont to discuss Camille Claudel 1915, his first collaboration with Binoche and the complexities of mental illness.

»

- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Camille Claudel 1915'

13 October 2014 12:30 PM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★☆☆If French director Bruno Dumont's last work, the enigmatic Hors Satan (2012), was a horror film devoid of genre convention then his latest, Camille Claudel 1915 (2013), is an enticing deconstruction of the period drama. The film, released on DVD in the UK this week after premièring at last year's Berlinale, is at its best when it attempts to reconcile the director's confrontational aesthetic with the early 20th century setting. On the whole, it's not so much the taming of a provocateur as it is the recontextualisation of a distinctive body of work. It's an unflinching portrait of an artist's imprisonment, featuring an ever-watchable Juliette Binoche stripped of both her humanity and the very means to create.

»

- CineVue UK

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Desire Without Language

13 October 2014 5:51 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 4. Desire Without Language

Weekend 3 - Jan.24-26th

The fourth chapter of the Harvard-Gulbenkian program stages a unique extended dialogue between Manuela Viegas and Lucrecia Martel, two artists who share a similar ambition to dramatically renew the potential of the cinema as an audio-visual and uniquely sensorial medium. Unseating the long-standing hierarchy of the visual in the cinema, the films of Viegas and Martel are intensely tactile and audio-visual, enriched by complex soundscapes that awaken the invisible, immeasurable space beyond the frame, animating and decentering the dynamically abstract mise-en-scene favored by both filmmakers. Despite their relatively small respective oeuvres—to date Martel has completed three features, Viegas just one—their every film is career defining and milestone. Indeed, with each work Viegas and Martel define a new paradigm of narrative cinema, a different means of reaching far beyond mere representation and story to open the all too often untapped phenomenological »

- Cinema Dialogues: Harvard at the Gulbenkian

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French TV Dramas Gain Popularity Around the World

8 October 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In the global game of TV program distribution, France is a rising player.

The land where only a few years ago U.S. series monopolized the primetime airwaves is now becoming one of Europe’s top creators of international drama skeins.

Not long ago French industryites were lamenting the aging of the local talent pool and the lack of homegrown, upscale series. Today, as the second edition of Direct to Series — a two-day confab and showcase in L.A. on Oct. 27-28 — underscores, France has established itself as a fertile ground for innovative narratives, up-and-coming talent and singular settings that, for U.S. and international buyers, represent a viable alternative to Scandinavian drama series.

This globalization trend has been bolstered by the launch of big-scale, globally driven companies like EuropaCorp TV (“Taxi Brooklyn”), Lagardere’s Atlantique (“Transporter”), Newen’s Capa Drama (“Versailles”), Haut et Court TV (“The Returned”), Shine Films »

- Elsa Keslassy

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David Cronenberg Says History Has Absolved His Cannes Jury For Awarding The Dardennes For 'Rosetta' In 1999

7 October 2014 12:44 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The year was 1999, and the competition at the Cannes Film Festival was pretty fierce. Takashi Kitano was in the mix with "Kikujiro," Jim Jarmusch was walking the red carpet with "Ghost Dog: The Way Of The Samurai," and David Lynch arrived with "The Straight Story," but the two movies causing the most buzz on the Croisette were Bruno Dumont's "L'humanité" and Pedro Almodovar's "All About My Mother." Those films were widely seen to be battling for the coveted Palme d'Or but that year, the prize somewhat controversially went to Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes' "Rosetta." It was their first Palme, followed by another in 2005 for "L'Enfant," and for David Cronenberg, who was jury president at the time, history has vindicated what was seen as a shocker fifteen years ago. "I think about [Fidel] Castro’s words. He said, 'history will absolve me.' I don’t know if that’ll work for Castro, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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NDM Acquires Gust Van den Berghe’s Rome World Preem ‘Lucifer’ (Exclusive)

2 October 2014 5:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rio De Janeiro — Just ten years ago, a rapidly-plexing Latin America seemed like a wasteland for arthouse distribution, as U.S. and overseas exhibition groups constructed multiplexes ideal for the exhibition of Hollywood blockbusters to Latin American youth and families.

Now the boot is – just slightly – moving towards the other foot. In its latest move, NDM, the adventurous Paris/Mexico based sales company launched by Jaime Romandia’s Mantarraya and Carlos Reygadas’ No Dream Cinema, has acquired world sales rights to “Lucifer,” from the almost preternaturally young Belgian director Gust Van den Berghe. When just 24, Van den Burghe burst onto the scene with “Little Baby Jesus of Flandyr,” which played Directors’ Fortnight in 2010, as did his follow-up, “Blue Bird.”

His third feature, “Lucifer” will world premiere in the main Cinema d’Oggi competition for emerging talent at mid-October’s Rome Festival.

The pick-up comes just six weeks after Ndm pounced »

- John Hopewell

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Daily | Nyff 2014 | Bruno Dumont’s Li’L Quinquin

1 October 2014 12:51 PM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

"It’s not HBO, it’s (French) TV," begins Adam Nayman in Cinema Scope, "and it’s also paradoxically the best movie that Bruno Dumont has made since L’humanite (1999)—a good point of comparison because Li’l Quinquin is basically a remake, give or take." "Is it Dumont’s best?" Michael Pattison asks in a conversation in the Notebook, to which Neil Young replies that "my gut reaction is to say yes, with the obvious caveat that Quinquin benefited massively from being such a volte-face…. There are moments of humor dotted through even Dumont’s ostensibly dourest efforts (I’m thinking of the hands poking out of the doors in Hors Satan proffering David Dewaele his grub) with the possible exception of Camille Claudel 1915. Not many guffaws in that one." We've got more reviews and the trailer. » - David Hudson »

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Montreal’s Festival du Nouveau Cinema unveils world-class line-up

23 September 2014 4:31 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

From October 8 to 19, the 43rd edition of the Festival du nouveau cinéma will run. This year’s lineup of 380 films (152 features and 228 shorts from 55 countries) includes 40 world premieres, 51 North American premieres and 41 Canadian premieres. The festival opens with the English language debut of Philippe Falardeau, The Good Lie and closes with the feature documentary The Salt of the Earth co-directed by Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado.

Always balancing the best of local and world cinema, this year’s line-up features favourites of the festival circuit including a number of key world premieres. Some key releases include, Félix and Meira (winner of best Canadian feature at Tiff), Adieu au langage (Jean- Luc Godard), Horse Money (Pedro Costa), Hard to Be a God (Aleksey German), Jauja (Lisandro Alonso), Maps to the Stars (David Cronenberg), P’tit Quinquin (Bruno Dumont), Wild (Jean-Marc Vallee), A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (Ana Lily Amirpour »

- Justine Smith

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Directors: Bruno Dumont, Martin Campbell And Katie Holmes Line Up New Projects

17 September 2014 11:08 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

After taking something of a left turn with his latest, the lighthearted TV miniseries "P'tit Quinquin," Bruno Dumont is moving in yet another interesting, unforeseen direction. The filmmaker is sticking in the world of TV, preparing a musical titled "Jeanette" for the channel Arte. It is about the childhood of Joan of Arc, and is based on the works of writer Charles Péguy, who wrote poetry and plays about the religious figure and "her personal struggle to come to terms with evil and her despair regarding the coming of God's kingdom." If anyone can pull off a musical about that, we suppose it's Dumont. [Telerama] "Hunter Killer" has hooked many directors over the years—Antoine FuquaPhillip NoyceMcG and Steven Quayle—without actually being made, and now Martin Campbell ("Casino Royale") is the latest to come in through the rotating doors of the forever developing movie. If it actually films. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Tiff 2014 Mubi Coverage Roundup

16 September 2014 4:40 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Below you will find our total coverage of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival, including a round up on experimental short films, reviews, and the festival-spanning dialog between our two main critics at Tiff. More interviews will be added to the index as they are published.

Correspondences

Between Fernando F. Croce and Daniel Kasman

#1

Fernando F. Croce on Pedro Costa's Horse Money, Lisandro Alonso's Jauja, and Olivier Assayas' Clouds of Sils Maria

#2

Daniel Kasman on Pedro Costa's Horse Money, Peter Ho-Sun Chan's Dearest, Roy Andersson's A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence, Takashi Miike's Over Your Dead Body, and Sono Sion's Tokyo Tribe

#3

Fernando F. Croce on Sono Sion's Tokyo Tribe, Jessica Hausner's Amour Fou, Johnnie To's Don't Go Breaking My Heart 2, and Abel Ferrara's Pasolini

#4

Daniel Kasman on Alexandre Larose's brouillard passage #14, Friedl vom Gröller's »

- Notebook

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Toronto Film Festival: Too Many Gems, No Sole Standout

10 September 2014 3:04 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As this year’s Toronto Film Festival hits its midpoint, the headlines are that sales have been slow and that Oscar prognosticators are still looking for The One — that mythical, anointed cinematic being that will appear before them (like Neo in “The Matrix” or the giant mechanical claw in “Toy Story”) and reveal itself to be this year’s odds-on best picture favorite. Meanwhile, for those of us who care more about the art of movies than the hype and the business, this over-programmed, over-scheduled but nonetheless essential festival of festivals has (as usual) been an embarrassment of riches. Of course, those who stick to Toronto’s starry, red-carpeted world premieres (here, as at most North American fests, milquetoast sops to the deep-pocketed donor-sponsor crowd) are bound to go home disappointed, though at least one of those much-buzzed titles, Chris Rock’s outrageously funny “Top Five,” was »

- Scott Foundas, Justin Chang and Peter Debruge

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Cracking Up: A Conversation on Bruno Dumont's "Li'l Quinquin"

10 September 2014 12:06 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The following exchange took place between critics Michael Pattison and Neil Young over email between 4 and 8 August, not long after Li’l Quinquin screened at Wrocław’s New Horizons International Film Festival—following its world-premiere at Cannes earlier this year, and now playing at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Set in a village in northern France and originally made in four parts for transmission on French television, Bruno Dumont’s latest work is 200 minutes in length and chronicles an unorthodox murder investigation conducted by Capt Van der Weyden (Bernard Pruvost) under the watchful eyes of a rambunctious kid known only by his nickname, Li'l Quinquin (Alane Delhaye).

Spoiler Warning: this exchange reveals and discusses significant plot details of Li’l Quinquin

Michael Pattison: You remarked on Twitter earlier that you were still thinking about Li’l Quinquin a day after seeing it—that, having slept on it, the film »

- Neil Young

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Boyhood wins top Fipresci critics award

5 September 2014 4:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Richard Linklater’s 12-year project beats Ida, The Grand Budapest Hotel and Winter Sleep.

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood has been named the best film of the past year by the members of the International Federation of Film Critics, Fipresci.

The poll for the Fipresci Grand Prix 2014 - Best Film of the Year gathered votes from 553 members throughout the world.

In the first phase, participants nominated feature-length films that received their world premiere no earlier than July 1, 2013. This led to a final round between the four finalists: Boyhood by Richard Linklater, Ida by Pawel Pawlikowski, The Grand Budapest Hotel by Wes Anderson, and Winter Sleep by Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

This is the first Linklater has won the prize, which has previously gone to Michael Haneke, Paul Thomas Anderson, Jafar Panahi, Pedro Almodóvar, Jean-Luc Godard and Nuri Bilge Ceylan, among others, since its establishment in 1999.

Boyhood will have a special screening at the San Sebastián Film Festival on Sept »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2003

1-20 of 74 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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