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Amy Ryan Talks About .Win Win!. She Also Dishes On .The Office. Finale! Am I Hearing Wedding Bells?

I love Amy Ryan! I still can.t forget her beautiful performance in .Gone Baby Gone.. In the new excellent dramedy .Win Win,. she plays Jackie Flaherty, the wife of Paul Giamatti.s Mike. I.m strongly supporting this great Thomas McCarthy (.The Station Agent,. .The Visitor. movie!

In this interview, we talked about:

What attracted her to making the film?

Her complex mother figure character

Working with Thomas McCarthy

Finding the right rhythm with Giamatti

How did she pick her roles?

And finally, .The Office!. Her character, Holly Flax, may be the reason why Steve Carrell.s Michael Scott is leaving .The Office!.

To watch my interview with Amy Ryan for "Win Win," click here

Here.s more info on .Win Win. from Yahoo:

Disheartened attorney Mike Flaherty, who moonlights as a high school wrestling coach, stumbles across a star athlete through some questionable business dealings while trying to support his family.
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Bobby Cannavale Interview for .Win Win. . Why You Really Have to See This Gem!

Bobby Cannavale co-stars in the new Fox Searchlight dramedy .Win Win.. He plays Terry Delfino, a friend of Paul Giamatti.s Mike Flaherty. I love this movie from writer/director Thomas McCarthy (.The Station Agent,. .The Visitor.). It.s a testament of our human frailties, about losing everything to win!

In this interview, we talked about:

Cannavale.s interest in working on the film and his character

Working with Thomas McCarthy

How he and Giamatti bonded

Did he wrestle when he was in high school?

Here.s more info on .Win Win. from Yahoo:

Disheartened attorney Mike Flaherty, who moonlights as a high school wrestling coach, stumbles across a star athlete through some questionable business dealings while trying to support his family. Just as it looks like he will get a double payday, the boy's mother shows up fresh from rehab and flat broke, threatening to derail everything.

Genres: Drama and Sports

Running Time: 1 hr.
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Kathryn Bigelow wins DGA Award

Kathryn Bigelow wins DGA Award
In an historic win, Kathryn Bigelow and her tense Iraq War drama "The Hurt Locker" from Summit Entertainment copped the DGA Award for best-directed feature film Saturday.

The win drew cheers from a packed ballroom of the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, where throughout the night it was clear many were pulling for Bigelow to deliver a dramatic victory for female filmmakers. The DGA feature film win was a first-ever by a woman.

"This is the most incredible moment of my life," Bigelow said.

Bigelow overcame competition including Fox-distributed "Avatar," directed by her ex-husband James Cameron; Lee Daniels and "Precious: Based on the Novel 'Push' by Sapphire" from Lionsgate; Jason Reitman and "Up in the Air" from Paramount; and Quentin Tarantino and "Inglourious Basterds" from the Weinstein Co.

The DGA's feature-film award is one of the best gauges of likely success in Oscar's best-director category. The Academy Award for directing
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Producers Guild of America (PGA) Hails "The Hurt Locker" for Best Film! See Complete List of PGA Awards Winners

The Producers Guild of America gave "The Hurt Locker" the best film award. The Kathryn Bigelow film won over "An Education," "Avatar," "District 9, " "Inglourious Basterds," "Invictus," "Precious," "Star Trek," "Up" and "Up in the Air."

In this competitive and unpredictable awards season, "The Hurt Locker" received an all-important ammo to move on, and perhaps win Best Picture at the Oscars.

For the past 20 years, the winner of the PGA awards has matched the Oscar Best Picture winner including last year's "Slumdog Millionaire."

Here's the complete list of winners and nominees of the 2010 Producers Guild Of America (PGA) Awards:

Darryl F. Zanuck Producer Of The Year Award In Theatrical Motion Pictures:

"The Hurt Locker" Winner

Producer(s): Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Nicolas Chartier, Greg Shapiro

"Avatar"

Producers: James Cameron, Jon Landau

"District 9"

Producers: Carolynne Cunningham, Peter Jackson

"An Education"

Producers: Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey

"Inglourious Basterds"

Producer: Lawrence Bender

"Invictus"

Producers: Clint Eastwood,
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Sci-Fi Tops Off the 2010 Producers Guild Nominees

Perhaps the biggest surprise with this morning's announcement of the 2010 Producers Guild Nominees is the inclusion of not just Avatar, but the fact both District 9 and Star Trek made their list of ten films vying for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award.

Along with those three we also have the rest of the Oscar front-runner elite. I have included the complete list below. I'm not sure I would say the winner at the PGA Awards makes for a guaranteed Best Picture winner at the Oscars. Althought the last two Best Picture winners (Slumdog Millionaire and No Country for Old Men) also won the PGA, it's a mixed bag after that with 13 of the 20 Producers Guild winners going on to win the Oscar since 1990.

The complete list of nominees is below and the PGA will announce the winner January 24 in a ceremony at the Hollywood Palladium based on voting by its 4,200 members.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Nominations For The 2010 PGA Awards

  • SneakPeek
The Producers Guild of America (PGA) has announced ten nominations for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in the Theatrical Motion Pictures category that will advance in the voting process for the 21st Annual PGA Awards, Sunday, January 24 @ the Hollywood Palladium, Los Angeles.

The PGA also announced nominees in other categories including: the PGA Producer of the Year Award in Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures; the PGA Producer of the Year Award in Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures; and the David L. Wolper Producer of the Year Award in Long-Form Television.

"...The Producers Guild of America is the non-profit trade group that represents, protects and promotes the interests of all members of the producing team in film, television and new media. The PGA has over 4,000 members who work together to protect and improve their careers, the industry and community by providing members health benefits, enforcing workplace labor laws, the
See full article at SneakPeek »

2010 Producers Guild Nominations Announced

The Producers Guild of America (PGA) announced today the ten nominations for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures category that will advance in the voting process for the 21st Annual PGA Awards, which will take place on Sunday, January 24th at the Hollywood Palladium. The PGA also announced nominees in other categories including: the PGA Producer of the Year Award in Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures; the PGA Producer of the Year Award in Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures; and the David L. Wolper Producer of the Year Award in Long-Form Television. The nominated films and programs are listed below in alphabetical order by category, along with producers. The producers' names listed for each nominated production are listed in alphabetical order and are not necessarily the proper order of credits:Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures:Avatar Producers: James Cameron,
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Avatar,' 'Up' among Producers Guild nominees

The Producers Guild of America is jumping on the "Avatar" bandwagon.

The top-grossing James Cameron film felt its heart go on when it was named among the 10 nominees for the Producers Guild Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award that were announced Tuesday (Jan. 5).

"Avatar" wasn't the only sci-fi film to feel the PGA love. The summer's blockbuster "Star Trek" and "District 9" also grabbed nominations for the prestigious award.

Pixar's "Up" received a double honor by being nominated in two categories: producer of the year and producer of the year for best animated film.

The PGA winners will be announced on Jan. 24 in Hollywood.

Below is the full list of nominees:

Nominees for the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award:

"Avatar"

Producers: James Cameron, Jon Landau

"District 9"

Producers: Carolynne Cunningham, Peter Jackson

"An Education"

Producers: Finola Dwyer, Amanda Posey

"The Hurt Locker"

Producer(s): Awaiting final credit determination.
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Producers Guild of America (PGA) Reveals Nominations

The Producers Guild of America has chosen ten films as nominees for its Best Picture award. The winner will be announced Jan. 24 at the Hollywood Palladium.

I'm proud to say that besides "A Serious Man," their choices of their 10 film nominees are similar to my Top 10 Best Films of 2009. :happy

The PGA opted to expand their nominees to 10 in response to the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences 10 Best Picture nominees.

Oscar watchers take note -- the Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award -- has matched the Oscar Best Picture in 13 of its 20 years. So the film that will win the PGA has a strong chance of winning the Oscars.

Here are the nominees of the 2010 2010 Producers Guild Of America Awards:

Darryl F. Zanuck Producer Of The Year Award In Theatrical Motion Pictures:

"Avatar"

Producers: James Cameron, Jon Landau

"District 9"

Producers: Carolynne Cunningham, Peter Jackson

"An Education"

Producers: Finola Dwyer,
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

The Namesake

The Namesake
TORONTO -- The fiction of Jhumpa Lahiri conveys a sense of disorientation and loss, of melancholy guilt mingling with the embrace of freedom. She writes of the immigrant experience in America and the film adaptation of her first novel, "The Namesake", from director Mira Nair honors her themes with a meticulous, understated, empathetic telling of the story of two generations of a Bengali family in America. What no film could probably do is get across Lahiri's rich descriptions of the quotidian that so vividly dramatizes the contrast in cultural ways of thinking and the identity confusions at the heart of her story. Nair's film settles for something closer to the surface that makes its dramatic points well and brings Lahiri's characters to life but misses the emotional intensity.

"The Namesake" is a highly personal film for its three authors -- Nair, Lahiri and screenwriter Sooni Taraporevala, all women of Indian origin who have lived much of their lives in the West. It is hard to imagine a better cast or production values so the film should find audiences among sophisticated urban adults. Certainly Lahiri's books have created a large fan base around the world for what is a universal story of a family in transition.

The Gangulis from Calcutta settle in New York in the 1970s after a traditional arranged marriage. When the couple has its first child, the task of naming the son falls to the grandmother of Ashima (Tabu). Only her letter never arrives from India and the hospital insists on a name for the birth certificate. So Ashoke (Irrfan Khan) names his son Gogol. This is the name of his favorite Russian author, but reason for that name goes deeper, back to a train wreck he survived as a young man in India.

It is Gogol's story we follow but his story also is that of his family. The first generation assimilates but never quite adjusts to the New World the way Gogol (Kal Penn) and his sister Sonia (Sahira Nair) do. "I feel like I gave birth to strangers!" Ashima declares one day. Not only are accents different but the youngsters' attitudes toward dating and drinking and the American lifestyle must be checked at the front door.

Gogol hates his name. When he enters university, he goes to great bother to legally change his "good name" to Nikhil. This is how everyone he meets from this point on will know him. The name uncertainty and passion to change it, of course, serves as metaphor for greater questions of identity. For Gogol will forever lead a double life: He lives in yet feels estranged from two cultures.

Penn, a fine American Indian actor getting a crack at his first lead in a major film, brings wonderful comic sensibility to the role that makes Gogol a much more companionable and amusing companion than his literary counterpart. But when the moment arrives, where Gogol/Nikhil has to grow up immediately and take over his responsibilities, Penn shows you a man who discovers his Indian-ness. The lightness of his previous scenes gives way to a more somber and perplexed individual. It's a smart performance.

The older actors, Khan and Tabu, who perform mostly in Indian art-house movies, alter their characters too from the novel in subtle ways, suggesting more warmth and love in the parents' lives. Neither actor is Bengali, yet both are more than credible with the accent, language and manner of people from that state.

The movie makes one jolting leap from Gogol as a teen to his job and romance following university graduation with a degree in architecture. It's more than a little bewildering and suggests a drastic postproduction editing decision.

Consequently, Gogol's romances have been reduced to two: with a rich but really nice American named Maxine (Jacinda Barrett), a woman who best expresses the social freedoms of the West, and Moushimi (Zuleikha Robinson), a fellow Bengali who demonstrates what can happen when someone living a dual life takes freedoms too far.

Cinematographer Frederick Elmes and production designer Stephanie Carroll don't push the contrasts between New York and Calcutta; letting those locations speak eloquently for themselves. Nitin Sawhney's Indian-spiced music is just right.

THE NAMESAKE

20th Century Fox

Fox Searchlight Pictures/Entertainment Farm/UTV Motion Pictures presents a Mirabai Films & Cine Mosaic production

Credits:

Director: Mira Nair

Screenwriter: Sooni Taraporevala

Based on the novel by: Jhumpa Lahiri

Producers: Lydia Dean Pilcher, Mira Nair

Executive producers: Yasushi Kotani, Taizo Son, Ronnie Screwvalal Director of photography: Frederick Elmes

Production designer: Stephanie Carroll

Costume designer: Arjun Bhasin

Co-producers: Lori Keith Douglas, Yukie Kito, Zarina Screwvala

Music: Nitin Sawhney

Editor: Allyson C. Johnson

Cast:

Gogol: Kal Penn

Ashima: Tabu

Ashoke: Irrfan Khan

Maxine: Jacinda Barrett

Moushimi: Zuleikha Robinson

Sonia: Sahira Nair

Running time -- 122 minutes

MPAA rating: PG-13

See also

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