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Thomas Dolby Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (5) | Personal Quotes (4)

Overview (4)

Date of Birth 14 October 1958London, England, UK
Birth NameThomas Morgan Robertson
Nicknames Tom
Dolby
Height 5' 6" (1.68 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Thomas Dolby was born on October 14, 1958 in London, England as Thomas Morgan Robertson. He has been married to Kathleen Beller since July 2, 1988. They have three children.

Spouse (1)

Kathleen Beller (2 July 1988 - present) (3 children)

Trivia (5)

Once sued by Dolby Laboratories, the company that holds the patent on the Dolby noise reduction system. He won.
Has three children with Kathleen Beller: Harper, Talia, and Graham.
An avid windsurfer; divides his time between his homes near San Francisco and England's East coast--both good windsurfing locations.
Was interviewed by writer, commentator and actor Martin Trees for a windsurfing celebrity story in the UK's Boards magazine (spring 2000).
Was given the nickname "Dolby" by friends in the late 1970s because he loved to toy with electronic music equipment. When he began his professional music career, he chose this nickname as part of his stage name.

Personal Quotes (4)

[on why he didn't produce more records] Producing means months in the studio with a fair amount of responsibility. There's the budget, the deadline, the drummer's drug problem, whatever. You have to be a grown-up, really. When you're the artist, you're allowed to be a crazy kid, and everyone around you supports that behavior, because they know that's where the excitement starts. So they allow you to be irresponsible. I tend to ping-pong between the child and the adult, and I don't think I could've spent all my time in the back seat. Also, I'm something of an exhibitionist. I need to express myself and have my own name attached to it, rather than somebody else's. In balance, you know? In good measure.
People would like to believe that Morrissey lived in a housing project on the outskirts of Manchester, and that he got up every day, dressed in rags, and wrote a couple of heartbreaking songs before his tea brewed. But by the time most people had heard of Morrissey, he was already a millionaire. I've got nothing against him. I think that's great. But it's an unfair requirement to make of musicians to expect them to have no shoes on their feet, or it's not "authentic." That's not reasonable.
[on finding the right performance venue] My least favorite is when it's in the sit-down, table-type venues and there are waitresses busing tables and people pouring beer. My favorite is the old movie theatres that we've done a few of. They have a history about them. People can settle into a comfortable chair, they've had their panini and a glass of wine, and they're prepared to give you their attention for an hour-and-a-half. That works well for me.
[on a 15 year sabbatical away from performance] Initially I got a grant to investigate interactive music, and how music should play in video games and in virtual reality and in location-based entertainment, and eventually the Internet. And over the course of the '90s we made some very innovative music applications - not unlike the apps you can download today. They enabled non-musicians to play music by moving blobs around or or clicking on different buttons to create their own mixes.The core technology was a synthesizer called Beatnik.

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