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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

9 items from 2017


‘I Love Dick’: Jill Soloway Loves The Theatrical Experience, But Thinks Binge Viewing Is the New Film Premiere

5 May 2017 11:07 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

While the pilot of the Amazon series “I Love Dick,” created by Jill Soloway and Sarah Gubbins, has been available to screen since last summer, the streaming service isn’t the only way to watch the show — at least, if you happened to be in Los Angeles recently for a full-day binge of the upcoming series.

Read More: Jill Soloway on the Audacity of ‘I Love Dick,’ and How It Might Create ‘Radical Feminist Sleeper Cells’

I Love Dick,” based on the book by Chris Kraus, is an intense examination of what it means to be both a woman and a creator, seen through the lens of a female filmmaker named Chris (played by Kathryn Hahn) as she falls under the thrall of a stoic artist named Dick (Kevin Bacon). How this disrupts her marriage and her work is only one strand of the series, which features an eclectic ensemble »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘I Love Dick’: Jill Soloway Loves The Theatrical Experience, But Thinks Binge Viewing Is the New Film Premiere

5 May 2017 11:07 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While the pilot of the Amazon series “I Love Dick,” created by Jill Soloway and Sarah Gubbins, has been available to screen since last summer, the streaming service isn’t the only way to watch the show — at least, if you happened to be in Los Angeles recently for a full-day binge of the upcoming series.

Read More: Jill Soloway on the Audacity of ‘I Love Dick,’ and How It Might Create ‘Radical Feminist Sleeper Cells’

I Love Dick,” based on the book by Chris Kraus, is an intense examination of what it means to be both a woman and a creator, seen through the lens of a female filmmaker named Chris (played by Kathryn Hahn) as she falls under the thrall of a stoic artist named Dick (Kevin Bacon). How this disrupts her marriage and her work is only one strand of the series, which features an eclectic ensemble »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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Hot Docs 2017 Women Directors: Meet Kalina Bertin — “Manic”

28 April 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Manic

Manic” is Kalina Bertin’s first feature. It will premiere at the 2017 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival on April 30.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Kb: “Manic” chronicles my struggle to make sense of the legacy of mental illness wreaking havoc over my siblings’ lives. Convinced that my father holds a key piece of the puzzle, I set out to find the truth about him, and discover a man known alternately as a cult leader, a scam artist, a prophet, and a father of fifteen. “Manic” invites the viewer on a compelling and intimate journey through time and through the mind, where past and present collide.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Kb: I still have vivid memories of my childhood with my father when we lived on the Caribbean island of Montserrat. When his love shone on me, my existence was filled with meaning and purpose. Occasionally experiencing his wrath, no matter how terrifying it could get, seemed to me at the time a natural compromise — part of the process of receiving his love.

But he was constantly in and out of my life. I didn’t have the basic information you normally should have about your father: His name was always changing, so I was confused as to what it actually was; I had no idea where he was from and not a clue what his profession was.

When I was five years old, my mother ran away with my three siblings and myself to Montreal to start a new life. Since then, my father has remained a mysterious character that I longed to know more about. When my father’s sudden murder was announced to us years later, it came as a shock.

It was around this time that my family’s mental health started falling apart. My sister had her first psychotic episode and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. My brother François had been living with bipolar disorder for seven years, but his state was deteriorating.

Could our father have something to do with this? Could his story hold the key to understanding what was happening to us?

There was a deep sense of urgency for me to understand and shed light on the mental illness that became very much part of my daily life, and I suspected it played a major role in my father’s own demise. Filming became my way of coping with what was happening at home but it also became a gateway into my siblings’ worlds, whom I loved and desperately wanted to understand.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Kb: The film has so many layers so I hope that everyone will come out with their own special take on the story. However, I can say that ultimately my goal was to shed light on bipolar disorder, a complex and larger than life condition which most people are unfamiliar with, but which is far more common than you would imagine.

I’m hoping people will leave the theater with a better understanding of what it is like to live with mental illness and how disastrous it can be to lead a life without seeking a successful treatment plan — not only for people suffering from the disorder, but for their loved ones as well.

My father was never successful in treating his own illness and it created a storm that engulfed and shattered so many lives. Ultimately, his children are the ones paying the price for the chaos he created.

On another level, I hope that by exposing this very personal story it will inspire others to tackle their own family issues. I had been haunted by our family secrets all my life and felt the need to face them head-on to set myself free. It was the only way for me to attempt to put an end to this vicious cycle of mental illness and trauma. I found this process to be extremely healing for myself and my family.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Kb: Meeting and interviewing the person who killed my father.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Kb: I pitched my project at the Cuban Hat Pitch in 2013 at the Montreal International Documentary festival and won. This helped establish credibility for the film. I was then able to obtain development funding from Sodec in 2014.

Once I had shot enough footage to put together a demo, EyeSteelFilm, a two-time Emmy winning and independent production company based in Montreal, came on board to help produce the project. We were subsequently able to secure funding through Super Channel, the Canada Media Fund, and Sodec during the production phase.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Hot Docs?

Kb: It’s an incredible honor to have my film screen in such a respected film festival and to have the opportunity to share the film with a documentary film-loving audience.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Kb: The best advice I’ve received is “follow your instinct,” because I’ve found that my instincts have never failed me throughout the process of making this film.

The worst advice would be to “forget about the past.” Growing up, that’s what I was told. But forgetting about the past is dangerous, because that’s how it continues to repeat itself. You need to face it in order to learn from it and build a better future.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Kb: Don’t wait for anyone to give you permission to be a director. Be a director. Know that you will probably have to work twice as hard as any male director to establish credibility for yourself and your projects. It’s a harsh situation and I am really hoping this will change, but for now this is the reality and it’s important to be aware of that.

The way you present yourself to your collaborators is extremely important — always stay true to yourself and remain confident. Claim what is rightfully yours but remain kind. Don’t take any bullshit from anyone and never be afraid to say no. If you have a story for a documentary film, don’t wait for funding to start filming.

Start now and apply for funding as you build the film. Listen carefully to your collaborators advice, including producers, editors, cinematographers, etc; Great gifts can come of it, but always remember that you are the director, so never hesitate to fight for the film you want to make. Make yourself heard and find efficient ways to communicate your vision.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Kb: The first film that automatically comes to mind is “Meshes of an Afternoon,” co-directed by Maya Deren. I was 18 when I first saw it and it had such a powerful impact on me. It opened up a whole other world of storytelling techniques to me. Not only was the film engaging, inspiring, and beautiful, it was made by a women in a male-dominated era. That helped me become more confident in pursuing my dream to become a director.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Kb: Here in Canada, the National Film Board, Telefilm, and Sodec have all recently announced concrete plans to reach woman-men equality by 2020 in the film industry for key creative roles such as director. These measures are important and necessary to give women their rightful place within the industry and to initiate a much needed cultural change.

Even if imposing quotas is just a first step, I must say that these measures have given me hope. Until we reach equality, it will remain a daily combat for women fighting against stereotypes within the industry.

https://medium.com/media/fe7435eaadc1ca939a4202c07b9446e4/href

Hot Docs 2017 Women Directors: Meet Kalina Bertin — “Manic” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Joseph Allen

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6 Filmmaking Tips from Maya Deren

26 April 2017 11:19 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

We celebrate the experimental cinema legend for her centennial. This Saturday is the 100th anniversary of Maya Deren’s birth, making it a time to honor the filmmaker, her work, and her significance and legacy within not just the arena of experimental cinema but film history in general. Regardless of the surreal, poetic content of her […]

The article 6 Filmmaking Tips from Maya Deren appeared first on Film School Rejects. »

- Christopher Campbell

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6 Filmmaking Tips from Maya Deren

26 April 2017 11:19 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

We celebrate the experimental cinema legend for her centennial.

This Saturday is the 100th anniversary of Maya Deren’s birth, making it a time to honor the filmmaker, her work, and her significance and legacy within not just the arena of experimental cinema but film history in general. Regardless of the surreal, poetic content of her films, which include Meshes of the Afternoon (with husband Alexander Hammid) and At Land, she’s important as a pioneer and theorist of independent film. It’s mostly through the latter that we can find her filmmaking advice and lessons, all of them more than 50 years old but still relevant to aspiring cinema artists today. Here are six of the tips, collected from her writings, lectures, and interviews:

1. Amateur Filmmaking is for Lovers

If you’re looking for advice on breaking into Hollywood, Deren’s tips are not for you. She was a big proponent of “amateur” filmmaking, which »

- Christopher Campbell

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The Ultimate Video Essay Guide to David Lynch

21 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

14 looks at cinema’s most provocative auteur.

Is there any contemporary filmmaker more provocative or polarizing than David Lynch? People who love him consider him a genius, and people who don’t consider him a weirdo. His films stubbornly eschew understanding for emotion, rely more heavily upon visual storytelling than that of the more traditional, narrative variety, and actively seek to make the audience uncomfortable as often as possible. Regardless where you stand on his work, you can’t deny Lynch is a capital-a Artist, a jack of all creative trades, and a cultural figure the likes of which we haven’t known since the heyday of Salvador Dali.

As such, that makes Lynch ripe for frequent exploration by video essayists seeking to unearth a little clarity from among his body of work. In my time at One Perfect Shot and Film School Rejects I’ve viewed essays attempting to define his themes and aesthetic, essays »

- H. Perry Horton

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5 Must-See Feminist Films From Women Directors at the Top of Their Games

6 March 2017 11:42 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Inspired by similar feminist film weeks in London and Berlin, the co-founders of Woman With a Movie Camera are bringing New York Feminist Film Week to the city’s Anthology Film Archives. Designed to illuminate cultural and cinematic approaches to feminism — intersectional, transnational and everything in between — the first annual Nyffw features a hearty slate of films directed by filmmakers both known and rising, but you don’t have to be in attendance to catch up on some of the most seminal screenings on their calendar.

Read More: Female Filmmakers Are ‘Grossly Underrepresented’ When It Comes to Directing Opportunities, New Study Finds

The inaugural Nyffw has divided its slate into a series of thoughtfully curated programs which tackle topics as wide-ranging as “Dismantling Islamophobia,” “Trans/Action” and “Bodies,” along with a special tribute to Barbara Hammer and an entire program dedicated to “feminist film genealogies.” Animation fans and those who »

- Kate Erbland

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Deadly Dialogue: Women in Horror Month Edition Featuring Jovanka Vuckovic, Karyn Kusama, Roxanne Benjamin & Annie Clark

16 February 2017 12:32 PM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Hello, readers! Welcome back for the another installment of one our featured columns here at Daily Dead, Deadly Dialogue: A Conversation on Cinema, in which we catch up with notable folks—both in front of and behind the camera—from the horror and sci-fi genres, to discuss the films that inspired them to become the artists they are today.

For February’s installment, I thought the timing was perfect to catch up with the directorial quartet behind Xx, considering it is Women in Horror Month and the anthology is making its way to select theaters and VOD on February 17th. Here’s what Jovanka Vuckovic, Karyn Kusama, Roxanne Benjamin, and Annie Clark had to say when asked about films or filmmakers that inspired them to follow their own creative paths.

Jovanka Vuckovic: I’ve been a horror fan my entire life, and every time I would finish watching a movie, »

- Heather Wixson

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Away with Words: Celia Rowlson-Hall’s "Ma"

18 January 2017 11:53 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Pregnancy and childbirth are intensely physical events. Despite their bodily primacy, these experiences are freighted with various significations, running the gamut from the woman-centered skill sets of midwifery to the all-too-frequent scaremongering and misinformation of anti-choice politics. This is not surprising since bodies have their semiotic dimension. Everything has meaning. However, the fact that these human events are unavoidably located on and in the female body—a body whose very generative capacity has historically made it an object of fear—seems to produce an excess of verbiage, a lot of it denigrating or punitive. And often this discussion leaves little room for other knowledges—the haptic, the gestural, the somatic.So what if, for a brief moment, we observed silence? To be clear, silence is no solution to political aggression against women. The more persistent the braying of misogynist forces who claim to know best, the louder the protests must be, »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

9 items from 2017


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