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1-20 of 40 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Adrian Noble to direct La Rue biopic

16 December 2014 8:21 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Biopic currently in development with BFI Film Fund; aiming for 2015 shoot.

UK production outfits Blacklisted Films and Leopard Drama (both part of the Argonon group) have attached theatre director Adrian Noble to direct their Danny La Rue biopic.

Based on an original screenplay by Martyn Hesford, the film is currently in development with the BFI Film Fund and is expected to go into production in 2015. 

Sir Danny La Rue, OBE was an British entertainer known for his singing and cross-dressing performances.

Noble, former artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, said: “What drew me to the project was Martyn’s brilliant and funny screenplay which tells two unexpected love stories in an unexpected way.

“Over the course of his life Danny stood at the fulcrum of a changing British society and his story is filled with potent images where a man could dress as a woman and rub shoulders with royalty and gangsters alike.”

Argonon’s most »

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Noble To Direct The Danny La Rue Biopic

16 December 2014 6:52 AM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Adrian Noble, the famed former artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, is set to helm the Danny La Rue biopic for Blacklisted Films and Leopard Drama.

Sir Danny La Rue, OBE was an British entertainer known for his singing and cross-dressing performances. Noble says: "Danny stood at the fulcrum of a changing British society and his story is filled with potent images where a man could dress as a woman and rub shoulders with royalty and gangsters alike.”

Martyn Hesford penned the script and filming is slated to get underway next year. Blacklisted Films are also developing an adaption of Richard McCann's novel for "Mother of Sorrows" by Terence Davies, and the psychological horror thriller "The Willows".

Source: Screen »

- Garth Franklin

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Daily | Books | Martin, Mekas, Pasolini

12 December 2014 9:20 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The prolific critic Adrian Martin has a new book out, Mise en Scène and Film Style: From Classical Hollywood to New Media Art. You may remember that in August, he wrote about the mise en scène of Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious (1946). Also in today's books roundup: Jonas Mekas on the poetry of Pier Paolo Pasolini, an excerpt from a new book on Asghar Farhadi, a review of another on Terence Davies, Ted Hope's story about Hal Hartley’s Flirt, memoirs by Anjelica Huston and Lena Dunham, a biography of John Wayne and more. » - David Hudson »

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International Star You Should Know: Agyness Deyn

5 December 2014 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dedicated followers of fashion know Agyness Deyn, 31, as the British supermodel to whom style bible iD once devoted an entire issue. But to British auteur Terence Davies, she was just another unknown actress when she auditioned for the lead in his latest opus “Sunset Song.”

“Terence doesn’t engage with the contemporary world of celebrity, so he had no idea who she was,” says producer Bob Last. “Even to this day, I think he’s oblivious.”

Potential-‘Pusher

Her bigscreen debut as Aphrodite in “Clash of the Titans” conformed to the supermodel stereotype — a bit of decorative typecasting in a blockbuster, with as few lines as possible. But she caught the attention of casting agents with her London stage debut in “The Leisure Society” in 2012, and that same year showed her screen potential with a gritty supporting role in the U.K. remake of Danish thriller “Pusher.”

Electric Lead

This year, »

- Adam Dawtrey

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Friends and colleagues remember Chris Collins

11 November 2014 2:55 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Colleagues including Elizabeth Karlsen, Adrian Wootton, Hugo Heppell and Amma Asante pay tribute to the late BFI Film Fund executive

I first met Chris at the Dinard FIlm Festival. I’d just watched Sarah Gavron’s beautiful rendition of Brick Lane, which Chris had produced.  After the screening he, Sarah and I sat at small table outdoors in the brilliant sunshine talking about films, the pressures of being an independent producer, our daughters and  how much I loved Brick Lane. I hope he knew that I was speaking from the heart. I was struck then by his quiet intelligence, his gracious and kind nature and his absolute devotion to and passion for independent film making. I could see that Sarah had enjoyed tremendous commitment from him as a producer on her first film. I was lucky enough, with my partner Stephen Woolley, to work with him consistently over the next eight years. He was unfailingly »

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Daily | Film Quarterly, Antonioni, Christie

23 October 2014 9:48 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The new issue of Film Quarterly tops today's round of news and views. Also: Brad Stevens on novelizations, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Michelangelo Antonioni, Jeff Reichert on Martin Scorsese, Michael Koresky on Terence Davies, Nick Pinkerton on Pee-wee's Playhouse, David Schmader on Drew Christie, plus news of forthcoming work from Philippe Grandrieux, Charlie Kaufman and Steve Carell, Robert Budreau and Ethan Hawke, and Jonathan Demme and Justin Timberlake. And the lineup for this year's AFI Fest is set. » - David Hudson »

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The Noteworthy: Bill Morrison at MoMA, Cinema Technique, Viff by Bordwell & Thompson

15 October 2014 5:12 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Edited by Adam Cook

Above: if you are fortunate enough to be in the vicinity of MoMA between now and November 21st, you may want to consider visiting their Bill Morrison exhibition. David Ehrlich of The Playlist interviews Mia Hansen-Løve about her new film Eden, as well as her next project.  In a web exclusive piece for Sight & Sound, Michael Pattison writes on experimental films from the London Film Festival and 25Fps in Zagreb:

"All art is by its very nature experimental. In the face of an increasingly standardised narrative cinema, one defining feature of the experimental mode might be miscellany. Festival programmes celebrating ‘experimental cinema’ subsequently accommodate everything from the impenetrably personal to the familiarly abstract.

More than most, when housed together, such works demand an omnivorously receptive sensibility: preferences are fine, but one’s sustained appreciation of this genre seemingly depends upon how long one is able to keep an open mind. »

- Notebook

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Daily | Books | Directors’ Novels

14 October 2014 1:26 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Iris Barry is "one of the secret heroines of the history of cinema—in fact, of the very idea that there is such a thing as a history of cinema," argues Richard Brody. Also in the New Yorker, Hilton Als reviews John Lahr's Tennessee Williams biography. For the Los Angeles Review of Books, Jordan Cronk talks with Michael Koresky about his new book on Terence Davies. At Flavorwire's Jason Bailey has posted an excerpt from his book on Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. And now that David Cronenberg's written a novel, Saul Austerlitz looks back on the many other filmmakers who've tried their hands at literature. » - David Hudson »

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Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

11 October 2014 5:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus, »

- Andre Soares

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Daily | Poitras, Manifestos, Tsai

17 September 2014 6:40 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Today's big news: Laura Poitras's film about Edward Snowden will see its world premiere at the New York Film Festival before screening in London and hitting theaters at the end of October. Also in today's roundup: A sampler of film manifestos, David Lowery on Tsai Ming-liang, Crystal Chan on Norman McLaren and David Gregory Lawson on Richard Linklater; interviews with David Lynch, Terry Gilliam and David Fincher; videos featuring Martin Scorsese and Terence Davies; and podcasts on Lauren Bacall and Ian McKellen. » - David Hudson »

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Pride review: Breakout British hit is a warm, witty triumph

10 September 2014 10:11 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Director Matthew Warchus; Screenwriter Stephen Beresford; Starring: Bill Nighy, Andrew Scott, Imelda Staunton, Dominic West, Paddy Considine; Running time: 120 mins; Certificate: 15

Writing an essentially feel-good movie about a group of gay men and women in the 1980s is no mean feat for a few very obvious reasons, and yet Matthew Warchus's homegrown breakout hit Pride walks the tonal tightrope with aplomb. Its very British brand of wit and salt-of-the-earth warmth inspires Billy Elliot and Full Monty comparisons, but first-time writer Stephen Beresford doesn't gloss over the darker corners of the true story he's adapting.

We begin at the 1984 London Pride march, where meek, closeted young Joe (George MacKay) gets inadvertently and literally swept along with a group of spirited protestors led by Mark Ashton (Ben Schnetzer), who are fed up of their message falling on deaf ears. Out of this frustration comes the idea for Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners, »

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Daily | Brooklyn Rail, Japan, Lonergan

8 September 2014 6:17 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The new Brooklyn Rail features articles on Terence Davies and Hou Hsiao-Hsien. Also in today's roundup of news and views: Mark Schilling on 25 years of Japanese cinema; surveys of the careers of James Woods, Rian Johnson and Eileen Chang; and Joan Crawford in the silent era. Plus Fipresci's choice for best film of the year is Richard Linklater's Boyhood. Kenneth Lonergan and Matt Damon have teamed up again. And remembering Donatas Banionis, star of Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris. » - David Hudson »

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Daily | Books | Godard, Herzog, Davies

7 September 2014 8:48 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In a roundup on new books, we point to an excerpt from Michael Koresky's Terence Davies, gather reviews of Paul Cronin's collection of interviews with Werner Herzog, cite Jonathan Rosenbaum's recommendation of Michael Witt’s book on Jean-Luc Godard's Histoire(s) du cinéma (no other book on late Godard "seems quite as durable, both as a beautiful object and as a user-friendly intellectual guide"), make note of strong reviews for a volume on Paul Thomas Anderson and consider the origins of British noir. » - David Hudson »

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Daily | Durgnat, Bordwell, Davies

4 September 2014 5:42 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The new issue of Cineaste is out, featuring interviews with Joaquim Pinto (What Now? Remind Me) and Andrew Rossi (Ivory Tower). Also in today's roundup of news and views: Henry K. Miller on 1963 as a watershed year for film criticism; an interview with Armond White; Michael Koresky on Terence Davies; David Bordwell looks back on the evolution of archives; Fabrice du Welz (Alleluia) revisits a moment in Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon; R. Emmet Sweeney writes about Jacques Tourneur's Out of the Past; Bob Fosse on All That Jazz; a trailer for a David Lynch exhibition—and more. » - David Hudson »

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Picturehouse acquires David Hockney doc

2 September 2014 12:23 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Satellite event planned live from Hockney’s Los Angeles studio.

Picturehouse Entertainment has acquired Randall Wright’s feature documentary on artist David Hockney and will open it across the UK on Nov 28.

The launch of Hockney will be driven by an exclusive preview at cinemas around the UK, followed by a satellite Q&A with David Hockney live from his studio in Los Angeles on Nov 25.

The 77-year-old artist granted unprecedented access to his personal archive of photographs and films for the documentary for the first time.

An important contributor to the Pop Art movement of the 1960s, Hockney is considered one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century and is perhaps most famous for his series of paintings of swimming pools, including 1967 work A Bigger Splash.

The documentary chronicles Hockney’s career, from his early life in working-class Bradford, where his love for pictures was developed through his admiration for cinema, to his relocation »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Picturehouse acquire David Hockney doc

2 September 2014 12:23 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Satellite event planned live from Hockney’s Los Angeles studio.

Picturehouse Entertainment has acquired Randall Wright’s feature documentary on artist David Hockney and will open it across the UK on Nov 28.

The launch of Hockney will be driven by an exclusive preview at cinemas around the UK, followed by a satellite Q&A with David Hockney live from his studio in Los Angeles on Nov 25.

The 77-year-old artist granted unprecedented access to his personal archive of photographs and films for the documentary for the first time.

An important contributor to the Pop Art movement of the 1960s, Hockney is considered one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century and is perhaps most famous for his series of paintings of swimming pools, including 1967 work A Bigger Splash.

The documentary chronicles Hockney’s career, from his early life in working-class Bradford, where his love for pictures was developed through his admiration for cinema, to his relocation »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Daily | Straub-Huillet, Welles, Davies

24 August 2014 6:28 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

A primer on and an interview with Jean-Marie Straub and the late Danièle Huillet, both from the early 80s, top today's round of news and views. Also: Three takes on Orson Welles, an excerpt from a new book on Terence Davies, a review of a new biography of John Gielgud, remembering Austrian filmmaker Florian Flicker, appreciations of two little-known 30s-era actresses, Glenda Farrell and Marjorie Rambeau, Guy Gilles Day at DC's, the trailer for Erol Minta's debut, Song of My Mother, the big winner at the Sarajevo Film Festival—and more. » - David Hudson »

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Lfs's Ben Gibson to join Aftrs

3 July 2014 5:46 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Outgoing director of the London Film School to join Australian Film School.

Ben Gibson, the departing director of the London Film School, has been appointed to a new senior role at Aftrs, the Australian Film Television & Radio School, as director, degree programs. He will start work in Sydney in September.

Gibson will play a key leadership role in ensuring the successful delivery and development of a new three-year Aftrs Bachelor of Arts (Screen) degree and Aftrs Screen and Screen Business Masters degrees, which are being restructured and relaunched for 2015.

Prior to joining the Lfs in 2001, Gibson worked as a film distributor and independent producer, and as head of production at the British Film Institute (BFI) from 1988 to 1998.

His production and executive production credits include Terence DaviesThe Long Day Closes, Derek Jarman’s Wittgenstein, John Maybury’s Love is the Devil, Carine Adler’s Under the Skin and Jasmin Dizdar’s Beautiful People, as well as »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Should Brit Star Tom Hiddleston Take on Country Icon Hank Williams?

12 June 2014 5:34 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

As high as I am on Tom Hiddleston, the idea of him playing all-American country music icon Hank Williams gives me pause. Somehow this role should go to an American actor. This casting feels like a foreign sales decision. Hiddleston, who is bankable thanks to playing Loki in two Thor films and "The Avengers," is set to play Williams in writer-director Marc Abraham's "I Saw the Light," based on Colin Escott’s biography.  Via Sony Atv, the biopic has secured rights to the Williams music catalogue including such hits as “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” “Hey Good Lookin’” and “Your Cheatin’ Heart.” Not that Hiddleston isn't a gifted actor and singer. After supporting roles in Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" and Steven Spielberg's "War Horse," Hiddleston starred opposite Rachel Weisz in Terence Davies' drama "Deep Blue Sea," in the TV series "The Hollow Crown, »

- Anne Thompson

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Screen unveils 2014 UK Stars of Tomorrow

5 June 2014 2:55 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Screen International is today unveiling its 2014 UK Stars of Tomorrow, profiling rising actors, writers, directors, producers and heads of department.Click here for the digital edition [Subscribers]Gallery: UK Stars of Tomorrow 2014

The 2014 Class of Screen International UK Stars of Tomorrow are: (click on each name for individual profile)

The Actors

Jamie Blackley

The South London native will star opposite Chloe Grace Moretz in If I Stay for Warner Bros/MGM.

Olivia Cooke

The 20-year-old Manchester native is already a familiar face in the Us, where she stars in TV series Bates Motel.

Sophie Cookson

The Oxford School of drama graduate landed the female lead in Matthew Vaughn’s Kingsman: The Secret Service.

McKell David

At just 17, this Harrow teenager is a veteran of his own YouTube show and will star in three new features: Don’t Grow Up, Legacy and Montana.

Calvin Demba

The 20-year-old East Ender has just shot an episode of Babylon and will star »

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