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1-20 of 22 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Tom Hollander, Andrew Davies, BBC America Bring Dylan Thomas to TCA

9 July 2014 4:33 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

BBC America always adds a big dollop of veddy British seasoning to TCA, but this year the cabler delivered a mini seminar on one of Blighty’s greatest 20th century poets, Dylan Thomas.

Tom Hollander plays the self-destructive Welshman in the telepic “A Poet in New York,” which chroncles Thomas’ last days in New York before his death in 1953 at age 39.

Hollander impresses in the role. It was clear from his appearance at TCA — via satellite because his flight out of France was unexpectedly grounded for weather conditions — that he steeped himself in Thomas lore. That process included weight gain of almost “two stone” in order to depict Thomas in his appropriately bloated, alcoholic state.

“I listened to as much of his poetry on my phone as I could,” Hollander said, noting that he sought out all the recordings of Thomas he could find. “And I thought about all the alcoholics I’ve known. »

- Cynthia Littleton

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Mr Selfridge to end after four series, says creator Andrew Davies

8 July 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Warning: This article contains spoilers that some readers may prefer to avoid.

Mr Selfridge will likely end after four series, its creator Andrew Davies has revealed.

Davies told Digital Spy that the ITV drama "was always conceived" with four series in mind.

"It was always conceived of as four series - that is, if people liked it enough," he explained. "People seem to love it, so I think we can do the four series."

Davies hinted the show's upcoming third run will see Jeremy Piven's Harry Selfridge grow "darker and wilder", following the death of his wife.

"He was just such a good boy all through the second series - I'd like him to cut loose in the third," the writer said.

"[In real life] he became increasingly wild and reckless and finished up penniless - so it's got a tragic arc at the end. I guess we're going to stick to that. »

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House of Cards: The UK classic vs Netflix Us revamp

7 July 2014 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

House of Cards will air on UKTV's Drama from Saturday (July 12) - but the star of this four-part serial is not Kevin Spacey's ruthless Us official Frank Underwood, but rather Tory chief whip Francis Urquhart, played with charming malevolence by Ian Richardson.

Adapted by Andrew Davies - writer of Mr Selfridge, Pride and Prejudice and many more - from Michael Dobbs's original novel, the UK iteration of House of Cards was a smash hit on both sides of the Atlantic. Scoring BAFTA and Emmy wins in the early '90s, it went on to inspire the acclaimed Netflix series.

"I feel flattered that Netflix chose to reconstruct it," says Davies. "And I'm delighted that ours has been rediscovered, and that it's going to be shown again on Drama."

Francis vs. Frank

But how does the original House of Cards compare to its modern counterpart? Though in many ways a »

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BBC America Announces Dylan Thomas Film from Screenwriter Andrew Davies

27 June 2014 1:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

BBC America has acquired A Poet in New York, a film about Dylan Thomas’ final days. The drama is written by Andrew Davies, BBC’s venerable screenwriter most acclaimed for the 1995 Pride and Prejudice as well as more recent well-received series like House of Cards and Little Dorrit.  It features several beloved BBC actors, with Tom Hollander (Rev., Pride and Prejudice) as Dylan Thomas and Essie Davis (Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries) as his wife. Ewen Bremner (TrainspottingPage Eight), and Phoebe Fox (SwitchNew Tricks) co-star.

The film will premiere this fall on BBC America and is directed by Aisling Walsh (Room at the Top, Loving Miss Hatto).

From BBC America -

“One of the most renowned poets in the world, Dylan Thomas is the creator of some of the most memorable lines in the English language. Known for his wild, hard-drinking lifestyle as well as his brilliance, his »

- Claire Hellar

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BBC America to Premiere ‘A Poet in New York’ This Fall

25 June 2014 1:03 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

BBC America has acquired the film “A Poet in New York,” starring Tom Hollander.

Hollander plays Dylan Thomas, the famous poet known for his wild, hard-drinking lifestyle.

Written by screenwriter Andrew Davies (“House of Cards”), the drama explores how Thomas’ experiences made his life virtually untenable and examines how his destructive personality played into his own demise.

The film is directed by Aisling Walsh and also stars Essie Davis, as Dylan’s wife Caitlin, Ewen Bremner and Phoebe Fox.

The film will premiere in the U.S. this fall on BBC America.

»

- Nikara Johns

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Guillermo Del Toro Exits 'Beauty and the Beast' Starring Emma Watson

12 June 2014 5:28 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Guillermo del Toro has bowed out of Warner Bros.' live-action revisionist take on Beauty and the Beast, which still has Emma Watson attached to star.

The studio is currently seeking a new director, although Guillermo del Toro will still be involved as a producer, alongside Denise Di Novi and Alison Greenspan. The filmmaker also co-wrote the script alongside Andrew Davies (Bridget Jones's Diary, The Three Musketeers).

The filmmaker signed on to direct back in February 2012, although he was initially only set to produce before taking on the directorial duties. While no reason was given for his departure from the director's chair, the filmmaker does have a massive number of projects on his slate. He is currently in post-production on his haunted house thriller Crimson Peak, and he is also attached to Haunted Mansion 3D, Frankenstein and Dark Universe, although it isn't known which project will come next.

The earliest »

- MovieWeb

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Colin Firth's 5 best screen roles: Pride and Prejudice, A Single Man

11 June 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

When Colin Firth is good, he's very, very good. And when he's bad, he's in Mamma Mia!. Or Gambit. Or St Trinian's. You can really take your pick.

Judging by the reviews to date, this week's true crime drama Devil's Knot - which stars Firth as a private investigator looking into the case of the West Memphis Three - falls into the latter category. Which, given that Firth's co-stars include Reese Witherspoon, Amy Ryan and Dane DeHaan, is a pretty substantial disappointment.

But why linger on the negative? Instead, we've taken a look back on five of Firth's finest hours across the big and small screens.

1. Tumbledown

Four years after his breakthrough role in Another Country (which just barely missed out on a spot in this list), Firth earned the first of many BAFTA nominations in Richard Eyre's Falklands War drama. He gives a raw and unflinching central performance »

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Can't hear Quirke? Audibility has fallen victim to TV's thirst for realism | Michael Simkins

5 June 2014 7:49 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The paymasters want tears, snot and estuary vowels and actors are willing to please, often to our own detriment

It's enough to make a grown man scream. As if the recent public furore over the poor quality sound in the BBC drama Jamaica Inn wasn't bad enough, now frazzled couch potatoes have been slamming the sides of their TV sets with renewed frenzy in an effort to find out why they can't hear Auntie's latest offering, the crime drama Quirke.

This flagship series has been bedevilled by exactly the sort of issues that plagued its benighted predecessor that of actor inaudibility. And it's no longer just the average punter who is complaining, for this time the outcry has been joined by celebrated screenwriter Andrew Davies, whose frustration carries rather more weight because he wrote the bloody thing. "I could work out what was being said," he admitted sheepishly, but not so his poor wife, »

- Michael Simkins

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Quirke 'mumbling' row: writer admits watching with subtitles

4 June 2014 10:04 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

BBC crime drama is the latest to face criticism over inaudible dialogue, after more than 2,000 complaints about Jamaica Inn

The writer of Quirke, the latest BBC drama to face complaints over inaudible, mumbled dialogue, has admitted watching it with the aid of subtitles.

Andrew Davies, one of the UK's best known screenwriters with credits including Pride and Prejudice, House of Cards and Bridget Jones Diary, said his wife had asked for subtitles to be turned on when they sat down to watch the BBC1 show, which airs on Sunday nights.

Continue reading »

- Jason Deans

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‘Quirke’ Episode 1: Christine Falls Review

27 May 2014 12:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: John Alexander

Screenplay: Andrew Davies

Starring: Gabriel Byrne, Michael Gambon, Geraldine Somerville, Aisling Franciosi, Nick Dunning

The BBC have taken some gambles on high profile detective dramas over the past few years. There was Zen with Rufus Sewell set in sumptuous Italy and Kenneth Branagh’s Wallander in a Sweden of buttery fields and bleak coastlines. The former died on its perfectly-formed backside and the latter took off but its star has a busy schedule. An initially unpromising setting of gloomy 1950s Dublin is the latest stalking ground for Quirke with Gabriel Byrne, and on this evidence there are the makings of a compelling saga with a few chunks of mystery thrown in for good measure.

Based on the books by Benjamin Black, Dr. Quirke is a pathologist, so ideally placed to be in the thick of a case, or at least follow in its aftermath and reawaken it as in tonight’s offering, »

- Steve Palace

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Dylan Thomas: A Poet In New York Review

20 May 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Director: Aisling Walsh

Writer: Andrew Davies

Starring: Tom Hollander, Essie Davis, Phoebe Fox, Ewen Bremner

They say never meet your heroes. In the case of poet Dylan Thomas this appears to have been resolutely the case, if a new BBC biopic is to be believed.

Portrayed by Tom Hollander as a bloated and hopeless case, with the echo of a glint in his eye, A Poet In New York examines Thomas’s final days staggering around the bars and women of New York, leading up to his undignified exit in 1953. It takes a few minutes to adjust to Hollander as a debauched figure, especially if your main exposure to him has been via priest sitcom Rev, but his skilled performance soon draws you in. Hollander has a short stature but a way of exerting a sudden, deep and powerful hold on camera, a quality that has served him well in »

- Steve Palace

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Unthinkable? A rethink of classic remakes | Editorial

25 April 2014 2:14 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Andrew Davies, the man who had Darcy rise up from the waters of Pemberley, once said: 'You have to get sex into the spine of the story'

It's been 21 years since the BBC last did Lady Chatterley's Lover, so isn't it time for a new one? No doubt it will be very good, with the lovemaking scenes a bit more explicit than before, and perhaps poor old Sir Clifford getting a bit more sympathy. But should we be going back to the well quite as often as we do? True, Lady Chatterley, which has been remade only four or five times, is well behind Pride and Prejudice, which the BBC first did on radio in 1924, and which has had as many as 20 retellings, depending how many foreign versions and loose interpretations you count. Andrew Davies, dean of classic adaptations, and the man who had Darcy rise up from the waters of Pemberley, »

- Editorial

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Dr Who: films of Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy

15 April 2014 2:13 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Alex Westthorp 16 Apr 2014 - 07:00

Alex's trek through the film roles of actors who've played the Doctor reaches Peter Davison, Colin Baker and Sylvester McCoy...

Read the previous part in this series, Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker, here.

In March 1981, as he made his Doctor Who debut, Peter Davison was already one the best known faces on British television. Not only was he the star of both a BBC and an ITV sitcom - Sink Or Swim and Holding The Fort - but as the young and slightly reckless Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great And Small, about the often humorous cases of Yorkshire vet James Herriot and his colleagues, he had cemented his stardom. The part led, indirectly, to his casting as the venerable Time Lord.

The recently installed Doctor Who producer, John Nathan-Turner, had been the Production Unit Manager on »

- louisamellor

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'House of Cards' Season 2 Debuts on Blu-ray and DVD June 17th

14 April 2014 10:29 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The highly anticipated and critically acclaimed political drama, House of Cards: The Complete Second Season, produced by Media Rights Capital, arrives on Blu-ray and DVD June 17 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. The series returns with two-time Academy Award winner Kevin Spacey (American Beauty, Best Actor in a Leading Role, 1999; The Usual Suspects, Best Actor in a Supporting Role; 1995) as the newly appointed Vice President of the United States, along with Robin Wright, this year's Golden Globe winner for her role as his wife, Claire Underwood (Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Drama). This series continues to sizzle with intensity as the ruthless Underwoods stop at nothing to climb the political food chain.

All 13 episodes will be available on the four-disc Blu-ray and four-disc DVD sets for House of Cards: The Complete Second Season with stunning collectible packaging on both releases, along with five bonus featurettes. »

- MovieWeb

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John David Coles Joins ‘House Of Cards’ As Executive Producer

2 April 2014 12:17 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

After directing three episodes of the second season of House Of Cards, director-producer John David Coles (The West Wing) is joining the Netflix drama series full time for Season 3 as executive producer/director. Coles previously was co-executive producer/director on CBS’ Elementary and executive producer/director on NBC’s Law & Order: Criminal Intent. He most recently helmed episodes of A&E’s Bates Motel and Starz’s upcoming drama series Power. On Mrc-produced House Of Cards, Coles — repped by UTA and Rain Management Group — will serve as an Ep alongside star Kevin Spacey, director David Fincher and writer Beau Willimon as well as Josh Donen, Eric Roth, Dana Brunetti, Lord Michael Dobbs and Andrew Davies. Related: Maryland House Fights Back Over ‘House Of Cards’ Tax Break Threat »

- NELLIE ANDREEVA

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Now it's The Walking Dead for kids – must we all be teenage zombies? | Michael Moran

25 March 2014 4:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

I can't think of many popular TV dramas this year that weren't focused on the Key Stage 3 set. Our society is becoming juvenile

Fox has just announced that one of its big hit series – The Walking Dead – is getting a family-friendly edited version to be broadcast earlier in the evening. Leaving aside the obvious gags about how the bowdlerised version of a bloodthirsty action drama set after a zombie-driven collapse of civilisation might make for a tidy five minutes of airtime, why?

There really is no shortage of "young adult" fiction, either on the page or on the screen, sloshing around our collective culture right now. Teen drama is omnipresent. If it didn't start with Harry Potter, the tales of the boy wizard were at least a tipping point.

Right now, the big Tumblr-friendly fantasy drama is Divergent. It's a sort of Brave New World knockoff that owes a substantial »

- Michael Moran

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Mr Selfridge to return for a third series on ITV

19 February 2014 9:22 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - TV news news »

Mr Selfridge is to return for a third series.

The period drama, fronted by Jeremy Piven, has been recommissioned by ITV, says Radio Times.

A second series is currently airing on Sunday nights at 9pm opposite BBC One's The Musketeers, which has also been picked up for another series.

Mr Selfridge returned to ITV in January, with 6.76m viewers tuning in for series two's opener.

The most recent episode pulled in an overnight average of 4.59m on February 16.

Frances O'Connor, Katherine Kelly and Grégory Fitoussi also star in the historical drama, from writer Andrew Davies.

Mr Selfridge: Alfie Boe sings in new clip - watch »

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Rewind TV: House of Cards; Babylon; Line of Duty – review

15 February 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The vindictive Claire came into her own in the first episode of the returning House of Cards, while Babylon searched for laughs in New Scotland Yard

House of Cards (Netflix)

Babylon (C4) | 4oD

Line of Duty (BBC2) | iPlayer

House of Cards, the four-part 1990 TV series adapted by Andrew Davies from Michael Dobbs's novel, was a fabulous hybrid of political satire and human drama. By turns gleefully astute and magisterially arch, the show revelled in a theatrical duplicity that was neatly distilled in the hero-villain's memorable catchphrase: "You might very well think that; I couldn't possibly comment."

One of the reasons it was so enjoyable was because all the serpentine machinations were indulgently native. It seemed like a story that simply couldn't exist without the history and histrionics of real-life Westminster. The culture of PMQs was Hoc's Usp, as British as Vat. Qed BBC. But then, more than 20 years later, the »

- Andrew Anthony

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Rewind TV: House of Cards; Babylon; Line of Duty – review

15 February 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The vindictive Claire came into her own in the first episode of the returning House of Cards, while Babylon searched for laughs in New Scotland Yard

House of Cards (Netflix)

Babylon (C4) | 4oD

Line of Duty (BBC2) | iPlayer

House of Cards, the four-part 1990 TV series adapted by Andrew Davies from Michael Dobbs's novel, was a fabulous hybrid of political satire and human drama. By turns gleefully astute and magisterially arch, the show revelled in a theatrical duplicity that was neatly distilled in the hero-villain's memorable catchphrase: "You might very well think that; I couldn't possibly comment."

One of the reasons it was so enjoyable was because all the serpentine machinations were indulgently native. It seemed like a story that simply couldn't exist without the history and histrionics of real-life Westminster. The culture of PMQs was Hoc's Usp, as British as Vat. Qed BBC. But then, more than 20 years later, the »

- Andrew Anthony

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The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 30-21

26 January 2014 9:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

We’ve reached the near mid-point of this Definitive List; 20 down, 30 to go. As we move forward, the story of “boy meets girl” becomes more complicated, as plenty of stumbling blocks stand in the way: lack of experience, insecurity, unsupportive parents, and, as in most cases, ego. So, when we watch all these films, what do we learn? Hundreds of romantic comedies end happily, but none end in the same way. Perhaps there’s a method to the madness, but the more we tread through these highlights, the more it’s clear that to make an impact, you have to change the game or perfect the existing one.

#30. Bull Durham (1988)

Baseball movies had worn out their welcome a bit in the mid-80s and audiences weren’t clamoring for a romantic comedy based around the national pastime. Enter writer/director Ron Shelton, who decided to write a film based on »

- Joshua Gaul

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002

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