IMDb > Andrew Davies > News
Quicklinks
Top Links
biography by votes awardsNewsDeskmessage board
Filmographies
overviewby type by year by ratings by votes awards by genre by keyword
Biographical
biography other works publicity photo galleryNewsDeskmessage board
External Links
official sites miscellaneous photographs sound clips video clips

News for
Andrew Davies (I) More at IMDbPro »

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002

18 items from 2016


Pride and Prejudice and Zombies review – undead breathe no life into revamp

11 February 2016 3:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This gimmicky reworking of Jane Austen’s classic uses deadpan decapitations to satire the prim costume drama but its gags are ultimately unearned

This laborious single-joke movie could well convince you that the mashup is the single most overrated thing in popular culture. Based on the 2009 bestseller attributed to “Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith”, the film is an elaborate spoof of Pride and Prejudice, taking place in an alternative England where the undead roam the land. The haughty Darcy (Sam Riley) is a renowned zombie hunter and Lizzie (Lily James) a dazzling ninja warrior. You get the elegant badinage, and then you get the people with half-eaten faces getting their bonneted heads blown off. It’s meticulously acted with deadpan attention to form – as well acted, in fact, as any conventional Austen adaptation – and it could conceivably be read as a satire of the traditional middlebrow tea-time costume drama (Andrew Davies »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


House Of Cards Season 4 Trailer is Here!

10 February 2016 6:52 PM, PST | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

Netflix has released a new trailer for the upcoming fourth season of its political drama House Of Cards, which you can check out below.

The critically acclaimed Emmy®-nominated drama has its Golden Globe® winning stars Kevin Spacey (as Francis Underwood) and Robin Wright (as Claire Underwood), whose characters have always been each other's’ strongest allies, showing cracks in their relationship. In an election year, the stakes are now higher than ever, and the biggest threat they face is contending with each other.

House Of Cards also stars Michael Kelly, Mahershala Ali,  ayne Atkinson, Neve Campbell, Derek Cecil, Nathan Darrow, Kim Dickens, Elizabeth Marvel, Dominique McElligott, Molly Parker, Paul Sparks, with Ellen Burstyn, Cicely Tyson and Joel Kinnaman.

Based on the BBC miniseries of the same name, the fourth season of House of Cards is executive produced by David Fincher, Kevin Spacey, Dana Brunetti, Joshua Donen, Eric Roth, Beau Willimon, »

- Kellvin Chavez

Permalink | Report a problem


'House of Cards' Season 4 Trailer Is Tearing the Underwoods Apart

10 February 2016 5:23 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

House of Cards Season 3 ended with on a bittersweet note for Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), who was named as the Democratic party's nominee for the 2016 election, but the final moments showed that his longtime wife Claire (Robin Wright) is leaving him, right in the middle of the campaign, following a violent fight the previous evening. Will The First Lady come back and stand by her man as the Presidential campaign heats up? That doesn't seem likely, as teased in the new trailer for Season 4 of House of Cards, which debuts Friday, March 4 on Netflix.

The trailer features Frank Underwood arguing with his estranged wife Claire, teasing that their relationship is more contentious than ever. We also get our first glimpse at a few new characters, played by Joel Kinnaman, who appears to be a new adversary for Frank, along with Neve Campbell and Ellen Burstyn, although no details have been »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


War and Peace … and then what?

8 February 2016 10:40 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Andrew Davies’s triumphant TV series has caused sales of Tolstoy’s epic to soar. Here are five more big reads to fill the gap – from Finnegans Wake to Gravity’s Rainbow. And every one is ripe for the small screen

Let the bells ring. War and Peace concludes in triumph. 5.7m viewers can’t be wrong. The critics agree: the man did it. He crammed Tolstoy’s massive quarts into half a dozen pint pots. Genius in a box set. Andrew Davies, reportedly, is signing up for Les Misérables. No warbling. No subtitles. If it has to be Victor Hugo I rather wish he’d gone for Toilers of the Sea, just to see how TV handled the giant squid (beats Moby-Dick any day of the week).

Davies’s breakthrough was Middlemarch, long ago in 1994. It was a book which Victorians like Trollope thought far too difficult for the »

- John Sutherland

Permalink | Report a problem


War and Peace watched by 5.7m as writer signs up for Les Misérables

8 February 2016 2:10 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Andrew Davies set to follow success of Tolstoy drama with adaptation for BBC of Victor Hugo novel

War and Peace bowed out with 5.7 million viewers on Sunday as it was revealed that scriptwriter Andrew Davies is set to follow the drama’s success with another period epic, Les Misérables.

Davies told the Telegraph he has signed up film producer Harvey Weinstein, who co-produced War and Peace, to the project, and is due to begin talks with the BBC. The Guardian reported earlier on Sunday that War and Peace producers Lookout Point were in “active” talks with Davies and his team about working on another “major classic”.

Related: War and Peace recap: episode six – bows out with a bonkers beard

Continue reading »

- Jasper Jackson

Permalink | Report a problem


Flashing the flesh – a history of TV nudity

2 February 2016 7:11 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

A Russian soldier in the buff on War and Peace is just another notch on the bedpost of TV nakedness – and proof that a penis can still prick people’s attention

Two decades ago, the screenwriter Andrew Davies gave Colin Firth a skinny-dipping scene in a BBC TV adaptation of Pride and Prejudice. It has become YouTube’s most popular man-in-water footage that doesn’t involve Tom Daley. Now Davies, in his current BBC1 version of War and Peace, has gone for what is technically known as a longer shot. On Sunday night, a Russian soldier, walking out of a lake, revealed a flash of penis 26 minutes after 9pm – the time known, with unusual appropriateness in this case, as the “watershed” for family viewing.

This shift of a couple of inches between the Austen and Tolstoy adaptations marks another notch on television’s bedpost of flesh-flashing.

Continue reading »

- Mark Lawson

Permalink | Report a problem


'House of Cards' Renewed for Season 5 with One Big Change

28 January 2016 6:13 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Netflix's hit series House of Cards will return with all 13 episodes of Season 4 streaming on Friday, March 4. Earlier today, the streaming service issued an early renewal for Season 5, which will debut sometime in 2017. However, the news also came with the announcement that series creator, executive producer and showrunner Beau Willimon is leaving the show. Here's what both Netflix and production company Media Rights Capital had to say in a statement, courtesy of Deadline.

"Netflix and Mrc owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to Beau Willimon for his strong narrative vision for House of Cards over the show's first four seasons. As an Academy Award nominated writer, he made his first foray into television and built a riveting and critically acclaimed series, establishing his place in TV history. The producers, cast and crew join us in wishing Beau the best in his next creative adventure."

Beau Willimon is an accomplished playwright »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


What Paul Dano and the Cast of 'War & Peace' Discovered About Harvey Weinstein's Favorite Page-Turner

19 January 2016 8:59 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

"War and Peace" is considered one of the densest works of literature ever written, filled with not just a huge number of characters and massive plotting, but much of the personal philosophy of author Leo Tolstoy. It also happens to be mega-producer Harvey Weinstein's favorite book, which is why he's helped to bring the novel to the screen in a four-part A&E/Lifetime/History miniseries event starring everyone from veteran actors like Gillian Anderson, Stephen Rea and Jim Broadbent to young but well-known faces like Paul Dano, Lily James and James Norton. Read More: Why Legendary Writer Andrew Davies Does Adaptations: 'F*ck All Happens to You' Directed by Tom Harper ("Misfits," "Peaky Blinders") and written by the legendary screenwriter Andrew Davies (nearly every great British novel adaptation of the last 25 years), "War and Peace" tracks the epic story while focusing largely on the awkward but well-meaning Pierre »

- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


What Paul Dano and the Cast of 'War & Peace' Discovered About Harvey Weinstein's Favorite Page-Turner

19 January 2016 8:59 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

"War and Peace" is considered one of the densest works of literature ever written, filled with not just a huge number of characters and massive plotting, but much of the personal philosophy of author Leo Tolstoy. It also happens to be mega-producer Harvey Weinstein's favorite book, which is why he's helped to bring the novel to the screen in a four-part A&E/Lifetime/History miniseries event starring everyone from veteran actors like Gillian Anderson, Stephen Rea and Jim Broadbent to young but well-known faces like Paul Dano, Lily James and James Norton. Read More: Why Legendary Writer Andrew Davies Does Adaptations: 'F*ck All Happens to You' Directed by Tom Harper ("Misfits," "Peaky Blinders") and written by the legendary screenwriter Andrew Davies (nearly every great British novel adaptation of the last 25 years), "War and Peace" tracks the epic story while focusing largely on the awkward but well-meaning Pierre »

- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


'War and Peace': TV Review

18 January 2016 11:08 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Once such a conspicuous totem of idealized literacy that poor Charlie Brown was forced to read it over winter vacation, Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace remains a core element of the literary canon, but it's likely that fewer people than ever are pretending to have read the book. Perhaps that will change with the new miniseries adaptation of War and Peace, airing in four two-hour episodes on A&E, Lifetime and History, starting Monday (Jan. 18) night. Written in its totality by Andrew Davies (the beloved Colin Firth Pride and Prejudice) and directed by Tom Harper, this new War and

read more

»

- Daniel Fienberg

Permalink | Report a problem


New Teaser Trailer For House Of Cards Pulls In

18 January 2016 5:11 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

It may come as something of a shock to be reminded that the upcoming new season of the award-winning Netflix Original, House Of Cards, is only its fourth. The American adaptation of the BBC drama of the same name – which was itself adapted from the novel by Michael Dobbs – was created by Beau Willimon, and boasts Dobbs and BBC writer Andrew Davies among its scribes, and the impressive creative talent involved goes some way to explaining how the show has come so far in only 39 episodes.

The series has thus far charted the rise to power of Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) – from influential U.S. Congressman to President of the United States – and has depicted all the grimy, unpleasant, and often criminal actions he has undertaken to reach the highest office in the land. By his side is his manipulative, and equally scheming (though, perhaps, less bloodthirsty) wife, Claire (Robin Wright »

- Sarah Myles

Permalink | Report a problem


War and Peace recap: episode two – forget pecs appeal, it's all about the flop of the fringe

10 January 2016 2:01 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

As the war against Napoleon continues, Pierre gets taken for a fool and Princess Marya learns of Prince Vassily’s plans, while Andrei and his quivering quiff go missing

Phew. That tricky second episode. So much to live up to after the first outing. And yet it delivered. With a side order of stuffed pig. I’m not sure whether to credit director Tom Harper or screenwriter Andrew Davies for the pacing (I suspect it’s a combination of the two) but it’s the balance of varying speeds in this adaptation that makes it so satisfying. Maybe I’ve had too much of a sniff of Dolokhov’s brandy-laced breath, but this felt like a dance that draws you in. Slow, slow, quick, quick, slow.

Is there anything this series can do wrong? Not much when Paul Dano is on screen. It’s hard to imagine a better casting for this role, »

- Viv Groskop

Permalink | Report a problem


The week in TV: War and Peace; Beowulf: Return to the Shieldlands; Deutschland 83; Spin; You Make Me Feel Like Dancing

9 January 2016 11:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Beautifully done if all too brief, the BBC’s six-hour War and Peace trounces ITV’s extravagantly awful Beowulf

War and Peace BBC1 | iPlayer

Beowulf: Return to the Shieldlands ITV | ITV Hub

Deutschland 83 C4 | All 4

Spin More 4 | All 4

You Make Me Feel Like Dancing BBC2 | iPlayer

Right: much to get through, so I’ll need to go lickety-split to cram in all the words. Adapter Andrew Davies had, some might say, an even tougher job, having chosen on some mad whim last year to pick up War and Peace.

For £29,000 a minute they barely managed to slather everyone in mud and stick Gollum’s face on an outsize dust bunny

Continue reading »

- Euan Ferguson

Permalink | Report a problem


The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 30-21

9 January 2016 4:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

We’ve reached the near mid-point of this Definitive List; 20 down, 30 to go. As we move forward, the story of “boy meets girl” becomes more complicated, as plenty of stumbling blocks stand in the way: lack of experience, insecurity, unsupportive parents, and, as in most cases, ego. So, when we watch all these films, what do we learn? Hundreds of romantic comedies end happily, but none end in the same way. Perhaps there’s a method to the madness, but the more we tread through these highlights, the more it’s clear that to make an impact, you have to change the game or perfect the existing one.

#30. Bull Durham (1988)

Baseball movies had worn out their welcome a bit in the mid-80s and audiences weren’t clamoring for a romantic comedy based around the national pastime. Enter writer/director Ron Shelton, who decided to write a film based on »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


War and Peace is a hit. But Britain can’t keep living in the past | Jonathan Freedland

8 January 2016 11:36 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

British TV’s period dramas are hugely popular, but they tell the world that our best days are behind us

Who can resist War and Peace? When it was a 1,300-page Russian novel, the answer was: plenty of us. But now it’s on television, its second episode airing on BBC1 on Sunday, millions of Britons find it just too tempting.

Last week a quarter of the entire UK audience watched the new £2m per episode adaptation. The women are beautiful, the men are handsome, the costumes gorgeous, the locations lush: throw in Tolstoy’s enduring story and characters, stripped, says adapter Andrew Davies, of all the “boring bits”, and no wonder it’s irresistible.

Related: War and Peace review – this silly Russian saga is a bit too English

Glimpses inside the servants’ quarters [in Downton Abbey] too often came through a lens misted with condescension

Continue reading »

- Jonathan Freedland

Permalink | Report a problem


Making war and peace with the other side | Letters

6 January 2016 11:04 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Stuart Jeffries calls for a revolution in British television to rid us of those costume dramas that have helped to keep us supine during the austerity years and not rise up and execute George Osborne for the public good (Last night’s TV, 4 January). As a Guardian columnist, is it inevitable that in his review of War and Peace, he brings in a “Bullingdon-meets-drones-club montage of poshos on the raz with unconvincing prostitutes”? All criticism is political and Jeffries’s overtly, so it was with a little surprise I discovered that he is actually hooked on Andrew Davies’s “latest sexed-up dozier of the classics”. Has he gone over to the other side?

Janice Ketley

Englefield Green, Surrey

• Your obituary of Lord Ezra (24 December) omitted his key role in master-minding Eisenhower’s “Transportation Plan” in 1944, which was the pivotal factor in preventing Rommel from getting reinforcements to the Normandy beachhead in time. »

- Letters

Permalink | Report a problem


War and Peace: what the newspaper TV critics think

4 January 2016 1:30 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

BBC1’s new series is, variously, ‘a masterpiece’, a drama that ‘would impress Napoleon himself’ and ‘too English’ with actors ‘swallowing their lines’

What did the newspaper critics think of the first episode of BBC1’s War and Peace? Some editors thought it important enough to warrant running reviews prominently on news pages.

The reaction was largely positive, with much praise for the adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s epic novel by Andrew Davies.

Related: War and Peace review – this silly Russian saga is a bit too English

Continue reading »

- Roy Greenslade

Permalink | Report a problem


Victorian classics don’t need TV to sex them up - they’re risque enough already | Kathryn Hughes

1 January 2016 9:19 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From George Eliot’s menstruation references to Anne Brontë’s depiction of alcoholism, 19th-century literature is less uptight than you might think

Those who watched TV over the festive period could be forgiven for thinking that people in the past barely bothered to get dressed. In And Then There Were None, the BBC’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s classic murder mystery, we were treated to Aidan Turner, playing one of the chief suspects, naked and deliciously slippy in nothing but a bath towel. This weekend, in Andrew Davies’s version of Tolstoy’s War and Peace, brother and sister Hélène and Anatole Kuragin will be seen snuggling incestuously in bed.

Related: Incestuous affair 'crucial' to BBC's War and Peace series

Continue reading »

- Kathryn Hughes

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2003 | 2002

18 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners