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The Unknown Girl Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Unknown Girl Movie Review
The Unknown Girl The Un(La fille inconnue) Director: Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne Written by: Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne Cast: Adèle Haenel, Olivier Bonnaud, Jérémie Renier, Louka Minella Christelle Cornil Screened at:Critics’ link, NYC, 9/1/17 Opens: September 8, 2017 At a time that the American people are faced with both threats and exhortations by our president […]

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Dardenne Brothers on Finding the Rhythm of ‘The Unknown Girl’ and Forgetting the Past

Those with any standing interest in the Dardenne brothers are well aware that The Unknown Girl is not a standard project, at least in how it’s traveled from creation to release. Breaking their long-standing one-every-three-years tradition, premiering but two (two!) years after Two Days, One Night, is one thing, and a forgivable thing at that had it earned the critical plaudits and awards handed them every single go-round. That it hobbled out of Cannes with, at best, “friendly” notices (if that) and nothing else in tow is, in and of itself, enough, but then the perfectionist pair went and reedited the film on account of these issues. Are some of the world’s most acclaimed filmmakers handing us a damaged object?

To my mind, no. The Unknown Girl is über-Dardenne brothers, a seemingly slight detective story collapsing nearly innumerable aesthetic, formal, and thematic interests into a warm embrace, reminding
See full article at The Film Stage »

15 Films to See in September

If you’ve already read our comprehensive, three-part fall-movie preview totaling 80 films, then you already have a strong sense of what will be included in this monthly round-up, but as new titles make their way to release calendars and our reviews come in, things will certainly shift. This month features the kick-off of fall film festivals, including Venice, Tiff, and Nyff, so check back for our coverage from each.

In the meantime, check out our recommendations of new releases below. It should be noted that this weekend, a 40th-anniversary restoration of Close Encounters of the Third Kind will get a nationwide release, thus proving to be the best option in an otherwise scarce lineup.

15. It (Andrés Muschietti; Sept. 8)

Synopsis: A group of bullied kids band together when a monster, taking the appearance of a clown, begins hunting children.

Trailer

Why You Should See It: Following The Dark Tower, the next
See full article at The Film Stage »

10 Best Movies to See in September: 'It,' Jennifer Lawrence and Lego Ninjas

10 Best Movies to See in September: 'It,' Jennifer Lawrence and Lego Ninjas
It's September: The young 'uns are back in school, going outside doesn't mean you'll automatically sweat through half your clothes and the movies bounce back from the annual August lull. Translation: Darren Aronofsky and Jennifer Lawrence invite you to a casual gathering from hell; a gruesome Stephen King adaptation gets served up; the kids get a new Lego movie (this time it's Ninjago!); and Jake Gyllenhaal plays a real-life hero and does a Boston accent, which must mean the awards-circuit season is starting up. Here are your 10 best reasons to
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Guilt as Madness: An Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

  • MUBI
Photo by Darren HughesThe Unknown Girl opens with a handheld close up of Dr. Jenny (Adèle Haenel) examining a patient. “Listen,” she says, handing her stethoscope to Julien (Olivier Bonnaud), a medical student who is interning at her clinic. Never ones to shy away from a glaring metaphor, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne announce in that brief exchange their film’s driving thematic and formal concerns. When Jenny later learns that her decision to not allow a late-night visitor into the clinic might have contributed to the young woman’s death, she puts her skills and training to new purpose: listening for clues that might help solve the murder.The Unknown Girl differs from the Dardennes’ previous fiction films only in its more obviously generic plotting. This seems to have contributed to the uncharacteristically mixed reviews that greeted the film at its 2016 Cannes premiere, where it was faulted for failing to
See full article at MUBI »

Curzon launches monthly subscription VoD offering

  • ScreenDaily
Curzon launches monthly subscription VoD offering
Exclusive: Curzon12 will stream recent and classic movies; first lineup revealed.

Curzon is beefing up its online offering with the launch of Curzon12, a monthly VoD service built into its membership packages.

The service will host 12 recent and classic movies which will be available to stream when logging in with a Curzon membership.

Scroll down for first lineup

Each month’s curated lineup, taken exclusively from Curzon’s library, is selected by the company’s programming team and is designed to complement the films playing across Curzon’s cinemas and its day-and-date service on Curzon Home Cinema that month.

The collection will feature the work of directors such as Yorgos Lanthimos, Charlie Chaplin, Andrea Arnold, Satyajit Ray and Agnes Varda as well as lesser known filmmakers.

The offering will be accompanied by a monthly newsletter that will delve deeper into three headline titles for that month.

The subscription is a benefit for existing and future members at no additional
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U.S. Trailer for the Dardennes’ ‘The Unknown Girl’ Uncovers a Mystery

It’s been a long wait for the latest drama from Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, but now after some re-tooling, The Unknown Girl, which premiered at Cannes to mixed reviews (including our own), will get a release this fall. Following a young doctor (Adèle Haenel) who is propelled to uncover the identity of a patient who died after refusing treatment, Sundance Selects have now debuted a new trailer.

In our review, we said, “The plot is entirely predicated on the kind of contrived coincidences that any screenwriting 101 professor would urge against, persistently dispelling the film’s realism.” Starring Adèle Haenel, Olivier Bonnaud, Jérémie Renier, and Louka Minnella, check out the trailer below.

The new film from acclaimed directors the Dardenne brothers (Two Days, One Night) is a searing saga of guilt and redemption. One evening after work hours, Jenny (Adèle Haenel), a young doctor, allows the door buzzer at
See full article at The Film Stage »

New Us Trailer for Dardenne Brothers' Latest Film 'The Unknown Girl'

"Think it over before giving up your career." Sundance Selects has revealed an official Us trailer for the film The Unknown Girl, the latest from French filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne. This premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016, to mixed reviews from critics, and is just now finally getting a release in the Us (after already opening in every other country). Adèle Haenel stars in The Unknown Girl as a young doctor at a clinic. After refusing to open the door after hours, the next morning the police come to question her about a person found dead nearby. She also starts her own obsessive investigation, attempting to figure out the woman's identity. The cast includes Olivier Bonnaud, Jérémie Renier, and Louka Minnella. If you're into the Dardennes' films, it's worth a watch, otherwise it's hard to recommend. Here's the official Us trailer (+ intl. poster) for the Dardennes' The Unknown Girl,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Trailer Watch: A Doctor Investigates a Murder in “The Unknown Girl”

“The Unknown Girl”

A doctor makes a life-changing decision not to open a door in a new trailer for “The Unknown Girl.” Dr. Jenny Davin (Adèle Haenel, “Love at First Fight”) and her assistant have worked more than an hour past closing when someone buzzes the door of the clinic they’re working in. Jenny is haunted by her choice not to answer when she finds out that the caller she refused has been murdered. The police can’t identify the girl’s body and their investigation leads them to Jenny.

“I can’t accept the idea they’ll bury her with no name,” Jenny says in the spot. Her guilt and sadness prompt her to do some digging of her own. She repeatedly asks the police for updates, and is told the case is none of her business. “We’re detectives, not you,” a surly officer explains.

It’s clear that Jenny’s obsessed with the case, and her desperate need for answers is causing her to risk her career. “She’s in my head all the time. But a good doctor has to control her emotions,” Jenny admits.

Written and directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (“Two Days, One Night”), “The Unknown Girl” hits U.S. theaters September 8. The French-language film made its world premiere at Cannes last year.

https://medium.com/media/66d86523961af62b6b8ad2c6bd5af236/href

Trailer Watch: A Doctor Investigates a Murder in “The Unknown Girl” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘The Unknown Girl’ Trailer: A Fateful Mistake Turns a Doctor Into a Detective in the Dardenne Brothers’ Mystery — Watch

‘The Unknown Girl’ Trailer: A Fateful Mistake Turns a Doctor Into a Detective in the Dardenne Brothers’ Mystery — Watch
A modern morality tale told with meticulous suspense, “The Unknown Girl” is the latest film from Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. Known for realist stories grounded in themes of economic and social justice, the Dardennes play with genre and mystery for their tenth feature. Premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016, where it received mixed reviews, “The Unknown Girl” has been described as “social-realist film noir.” The film released its official U.S. trailer today.

Read More:‘The Unknown Girl’ Directors The Dardenne Brothers Say They’re Really Just One Person

After refusing after-hours care to a mystery woman found dead outside her clinic, a young doctor (Adele Haenel) becomes obsessed with discovering the fate of the unidentified caller. Plagues by guilt, she begins a methodical search to learn more about the young woman’s life and death. The film also stars Jeremie Renier, Olivier Bonnaud, and Louka Minnella.
See full article at Indiewire »

Exclusive: U.S. Trailer For Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne’s ‘The Unknown Girl’

Any film from sibling directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne is cause for celebration. The filmmakers, known for their intimate stories that carry a big emotional impact, have carved out their own, highly satisfying niche in the arthouse world, and fans will soon have another reason get excited. Their latest film, “The Unknown Girl,” is headed to U.S. cinemas and today we have the exclusive trailer.

Starring Adele Haenel, Jeremie Renier, Olivier Bonnaud, and Louka Minnella, the story follows a young doctor who embarks on a journey to learn the identity of a woman she turned away, and who later wound up dead.

Continue reading Exclusive: U.S. Trailer For Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne’s ‘The Unknown Girl’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

80 top film-makers sound alarm over EU copyright rules

80 top film-makers sound alarm over EU copyright rules
Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors
See full article at ScreenDaily »

80 top film-makers demand changes to EU copyright rules

80 top film-makers demand changes to EU copyright rules
Petition calls for unified EU vision on copyright and culture.

Cannes Palme d’Or contenders Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Michel Hazanavicius have joined 80 top European film-makers in a petition calling for a unified European Union vision on copyright and culture in the digital age.

“We believe that European filmmaking reflects Europe’s positive values. That it can inspire ambition and renewal in Europe’s cultural policies. Europe isn’t just jobs, territories, markets and consumers, European culture also supports multiple identities, democracy and freedom of expression,” the petition said.

Published to coincide with the European Film Forum in Cannes on Monday, it highlighted four key areas where the European Union needed to renew and reinforce its legislation to protect European culture.

Top of the filmmakers’ demands was the maintaining of the territoriality of copyright.

The European Parliament voted last week in favour of a European Commission proposal to de-territorialise digital rights, but the directors
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Festival, Argentina’s Incaa Re-Up on Ventana Sur Through 2020

Cannes Festival, Argentina’s Incaa Re-Up on Ventana Sur Through 2020
Cannes — Continuing its biggest overseas initiative outside its May event on France’s Riviera, the Cannes Festival has re-upped with Argentina’s National Film and Audiovisual Arts Institute (Incaa), for a further three editions of Ventana Sur, running over 2018-20.

A bold venture close to Cannes delegate general Thierry Fremaux’s heart, Ventana Sur was launched in 2009 by the Cannes Festival and Cannes Film Market on one hand and Argentina’s Incaa, its cornerstone film.TV funding agency, on the other.

Staged just after Thanksgiving in a delightfully early-Summer Buenos Aires, Ventana Sur aimed when launching to become a movie export market in Latin America for Latin America movies. Parallel to the market, Fremaux initiated a Cannes Festival Film Week in Buenos Aires which showcased key titles from May’s edition of the Cannes Festival.

Aimed at helping movies’ distribution in Argentina and Latin America, and presented with typical pizzazz by Fremaux,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Liege Becomes Burgeoning Hub for Belgian Cinema

Four times smaller than Brussels and with a population of around 700,000, the Francophone city of Liège has emerged as a major hub in the Belgian filmmaking industry. Bordering Germany and the Netherlands, Belgium’s easternmost city has been steadily growing its production and post-production infrastructure over the past several years, playing host to more than 41 shoots in 2016, as well some the most dynamic and consequential production shingles in the country.

This was not always the case. When native sons Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (winners of the Palme d’Or for the “Rosetta” and “The Child”) opened Les Films du Fleuve in 1994 to finance their own films, they were pretty much the only game in town, alongside Les Films de la Passerelle, a non-fiction outlet devoted to socially minded documentaries.

A series of public reforms changed all that. In January 2000, the Walloon government introduced Wallimage, a regional investment fund with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Here Comes the Rain Again—Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “After the Storm”

  • MUBI
Many critics accuse directors like Terrence Malick, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, and Asghar Farhadi of making the same movie each time out. The inherent laziness of this argument says more about the writer than the artist, but it also easily disregards stylistic and thematic motifs that are still evolving within a body of work. Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda regularly experiences such reductive forms of analysis. Quietly patient and wise, his films are breezy dramatic miniatures that examine the nuances of everyday life. Most impressively, they challenge preconceptions about dramatic redemption, giving conflicted characters the opportunity to grieve, learn, rejoice, and evolve at their own pace. Kore-eda’s After the Storm follows a similarly measured trajectory. It appreciates the present moment even as its lead protagonist continues to dwell on the past. Once a successful novelist, Ryota (Hiroshi Abe) moonlights as a private detective using the job’s free-ranging latitude to
See full article at MUBI »

‘Elle’ Star Isabelle Huppert Wins Best Actress, Xavier Dolan Wins Best Director at France’s Cesar Awards

‘Elle’ Star Isabelle Huppert Wins Best Actress, Xavier Dolan Wins Best Director at France’s Cesar Awards
Paris — Oscar nominee Isabelle Huppert won best actress at the 42nd Cesar Awards, the country’s top film prize.

Out of 16th Cesar nominations, Huppert had only won once for her performance in Claude Chabrol’s “La Ceremonie.”

Huppert has been on a laureled path since “Elle” competed at Cannes: she notably won the Golden Globe award. Set in France and produced by Said Ben Said and Michel Merkt, “Elle” has been described as a powerful rape-revenge thriller laced with dark humor. The movie was acquired by Sony Pictures Classics at Cannes.

The biggest surprise of the night was Xavier Dolan winning best director and editing with “It’s Only The End of the World” which also earned Gaspard Ulliel the best actor prize. Dolan is currently shooting “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan” in Prague.

Dolan won over Paul Verhoeven (“Elle”), Houda Benyamina (“Divines”), François Ozon (“Frantz
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The view from the mountain by Anne-Katrin Titze

Graduation (Bacalaureat) director Cristian Mungiu: "Everything in the film has a real level and a real explanation." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The director of Beyond The Hills, starring Cristina Flutur and Cosmina Stratan, and Cannes Palme d'Or winner for 4 Months, 3 Weeks And 2 Days, explored his latest film with me when we met for a conversation at the 54th New York Film Festival. Graduation (Bacalaureat), co-produced by Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, had its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival where he shared Best Director honors with Olivier Assayas.

Romeo (Adrian Titieni), a doctor in the hospital of a provincial town wishes nothing more urgently than for his daughter Eliza (Maria-Victoria Dragus) to be awarded a scholarship to Cambridge so that she can leave for "civilised" England. All Eliza has to do, is pass the graduation exams with her usual, excellent grades.

Marius (Rares Andrici), Eliza (Maria-Victoria Dragus) and Romeo
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »
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