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Review: Wildlife (Sundance)

  • JoBlo
Plot: The disintegration of a marriage, as seen through the eyes of a couple’s fourteen-year-old son. Review: Wildlife marks the directorial debut of actor Paul Dano, in a film he co-wrote with his partner, Zoe Kazan, and is based on the short novel by Richard Ford. Already, it’s raking-up acclaim, with many critics here claiming Dano’s film is nothing short of brilliant. While I... Read More...
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Paul Dano Brings Carey Mulligan To Sundance With His Directorial Debut ‘Wildlife’ – Sundance Studio

Paul Dano Brings Carey Mulligan To Sundance With His Directorial Debut ‘Wildlife’ – Sundance Studio
Paul Dano has been a Sundance fixture since his first trip to the festival when he was 16. He returns this year for the first time as a director, with his adaptation of Richard Ford’s Wildlife, co-written by Zoe Kazan. At Deadline’s Sundance Studio he expounded on his love of Ford’s work. When he picked up Wildlife, he told me, “Pretty much from the first sentence I knew I was going to love this book. I thought after reading it there might be a film here and maybe a film…
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Scott Reviews Paul Dano’s Wildlife [Sundance 2018]

The prestige debut film is cornerstone of the modern art house market, and thus a persistent presence at Sundance. They are beautifully (almost too-cleanly) photographed, ostentatiously performed, over-explanatory, and narratively tidy. Paul Dano’s Wildlife has some of these pitfalls – in particular, it feels terribly insular to the point that anyone besides the four main performances feels under-directed – but is on the whole a mature, thoughtful film that I found awfully affecting.

Joe (Ed Oxenbould) has been on the move. His parents are habitually restless, rambling generally eastward in search of new jobs, new neighborhoods, new lives. At fourteen, he’s too old to keep going through it and too young to do anything about it. Lately, they’ve settled in Montana. They don’t know anyone. Jerry (Jake Gyllenhaal), is making the best of his job at a golf course, which means nothing when he is suddenly fired. His wife,
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Wildlife review - Carey Mulligan plays flirtatious under big skies in Paul Dano's directorial debut

Mulligan is an unhappy wife and mother looking to break free in this adaptation of Richard Ford’s Montana-set novel

They call Montana “Big Sky Country” which I’ve always found to be the most beautiful nickname. It doesn’t quite make sense – how could the sky be bigger there than in London or Paris or Asbury Park, New Jersey? – but somehow an image still develops in the mind. Those snowy mountaintops and unobstructed horizons get plenty of screen time in Wildlife, a small gem of a film directed by Paul Dano, adapted by him and Zoe Kazan from a Richard Ford novel.

It is a quiet, subtle story and, as is so often the case when an actor takes their first trip behind the camera, a showcase for terrific performances. Front and center here is Carey Mulligan as a young wife and mother in 1960 edging toward independence. Jeanette (Mulligan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Astounds in Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut | Sundance 2018

Wildlife is a film about faces. The face of a young boy, confused and inquisitive, attempting to untangle the mystery behind his parents’ quiet conversations. The face of a mother, resilient yet fragile, attempting to put on a façade of optimism when surrounded by impending destruction. The face of a father, embarrassed and defeated, trying to maintain a shred of dignity as he loses his job. That Paul Dano chose the Richard Ford novel Wildlife as his directorial debut was a feat of ambition, but in practice—working from a meticulous and introspective script he co-wrote with Zoe …
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Keira Knightley Says Streaming Services Are Helping Create More Compelling Roles for Women in Film — Sundance 2018

Keira Knightley Says Streaming Services Are Helping Create More Compelling Roles for Women in Film — Sundance 2018
There’s no big secret as to why Keira Knightley keeps gravitating towards historical and period-set movies: they just happen to offer her the kind of roles she’s eager to sink her teeth into. Recently, the actress told Variety, “I don’t really do films set in the modern day because the female characters nearly always get raped. I always find something distasteful in the way women are portrayed.” For her, the “very inspiring” characters keep showing up in movies set decades, even centuries ago.

Such is the case with Wash Westmoreland’s “Colette,” which just debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, starring Knightley in the eponymous role of the trailblazing French author. But while “Colette” itself includes plenty of “modern” touches and ideas, Knightley is also enthused by what she sees as an uptick in better, beefier roles for women in modern-set movies.

Read More:Keira Knightley Stays Away
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Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance

Carey Mulligan Talks About Being Directed by Longtime Friend and First-Time Filmmaker Paul Dano — Sundance
Friendly collaboration is a part of independent film, but it’s always a challenge to work with your actual friends. At the IndieWire Sundance Studio presented by Dropbox, “Wildlife” star Carey Mulligan shared her experiences working with longtime friends Paul Dano and Zoe Kazan.

“There was a kind of triple threat of fear involved in working with people I’ve known as friends for a decade,” Mulligan said. “It was really amazing to be able to work with someone who understands acting so well and understands the holes that you get into when you can’t understand something or the problems that you have in the room, in the moment with that one line.”

Read More:‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018

Mulligan stars in the film as Jeanette, a mother trying to keep her family intact after her husband
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Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review]

Sometimes actors can really direct. Case in point, Paul Dano. Having worked with masters of the form in his short but impressive career, Dano seems to have learned a lot from the likes of Steve McQueen, Denis Villeneuve, Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson. One would easily think that the 35-year-old actor, now turned filmmaker, looked closely and attentively at these filmmakers at work to prepare for his eventual debut, “Wildlife.” The result is a precise, controlled, but perhaps emotionally distant adaptation of Richard Ford’s short novel.

Continue reading Carey Mulligan Shines In Emotionally Distant ‘Wildlife’ [Sundance Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018

‘Wildlife’ Review: Carey Mulligan Is on Fire in Paul Dano’s Stunningly Beautiful Directorial Debut — Sundance 2018
Families are built upon two things: blood and belief. They can get by on the strength of one or the other (to have both is something of a luxury), but when the latter starts to wither, the former can only do so much to save it. This strange alchemy — the science responsible for so many American lives — percolates inside every frame of Paul Dano’s remarkable “Wildlife,” a tender, gorgeous, and exquisitely understated drama about a family that loses its faith in itself.

Adapted from Richard Ford’s 1990 novel of the same name, “Wildlife” begins in a calm and idyllic Montana town circa early 1960s. More specifically, it begins on the front lawn of a small house where a father and son are throwing a football just before dinner, disrupting the Edward Hopper tableaux like a fleck of stray paint. The two of them disappear around the side of the property,
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‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis

‘Wildlife’ Review: Paul Dano’s Directorial Debut Is an Austere Portrait of a Family in Crisis
Actors Paul Dano and Idris Elba both premiered their feature directing debuts on Saturday at the Sundance Film Festival, but it would be hard to imagine two films more dissimilar than Dano’s “Wildlife” and Elba’s “Yardie.” The latter, which TheWrap will cover separately, is a rough and violent story set in East London in the 1970s. But Dano’s film, which he adapted with his partner, Zoe Kazan, from the Richard Ford novel, is quiet and contemplative; there’s emotional tumult, to be sure, but “Wildlife” is stylishly understated and slow-paced to a degree that may alienate some viewers, who’ll find the...
See full article at The Wrap »

'Wildlife': Film Review | Sundance 2018

'Wildlife': Film Review | Sundance 2018
Actor Paul Dano has made a small gem in Wildlife, his first film as a director. Precise, controlled and emotionally acute, this adaptation of Richard Ford’s short fourth novel, published in 1990, examines the disintegration of a marriage from the point of view of the couple’s 14-year-old son (he was two years older in the book) and does so with gentle precision and narrative economy. Unusually restrained and unemphatic by contemporary standards, the film possesses an integrity and economy of means that earns respect, even if it will probably feel old-fashioned to contemporary adolescents in the same age bracket as...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Wildlife’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Wildlife’
As an actor, Paul Dano, with his long-faced gaze of inquiring gloom, has always radiated a sense of unease. That’s far from the only thing he communicates (he was spectacular as Brian Wilson in “Love & Mercy,” a performance that beautifully merged Wilson’s disturbance and his joy). But a kind of hushed foreboding remains the vintage Dano mood, and “Wildlife,” his directorial debut, is suffused with it.

The movie, adapted from a novel by Richard Ford, takes place in 1960 in the small town of Great Falls, Montana (the setting for several other Ford tales), and Dano instantly establishes his command as a filmmaker by re-creating the period with an authenticity that’s scrupulous enough to seem downright exotic. The desks in the school, the stacks and stacks of cans in the supermarket, the clunky way the channel changer works on the TV set — and, above all, the calm that hovers on the edge of desolation:
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Review: ‘Wildlife’ is a Remarkably Assured Directorial Debut for Paul Dano

“I feel like I need to wake up, but I don’t know what from… or to,” Carey Mulligan’s Jeanette declares to her teenage son Joe (Ed Oxenbould) in Wildlife, Paul Dano’s remarkably assured, thematically rich directorial debut. The haze Jeanette finds herself in is due to her husband Jerry (Jake Gyllenhaal) having abandoned them to fight a wildfire close to the Canadian border. The absence of a patriarchal figure in their family, who have recently relocated to small-town Montana, leads to Jeanette discovering newfound, untidy emotional independence and her son is there to witness the protracted, quietly devastating unraveling of a marriage.

Dano has worked with the likes of Denis Villeneuve, Bong Joon-ho, Rian Johnson, Steve McQueen, and Paul Thomas Anderson, but the past collaborations that he seems to draw the most from for Wildlife are Ang Lee and Kelly Reichardt. Blending the emotional subtleties of a
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘American Animals’ Director Bart Layton Reveals the True Story Behind His Stranger-Than-Fiction Sundance Caper — Watch

‘American Animals’ Director Bart Layton Reveals the True Story Behind His Stranger-Than-Fiction Sundance Caper — Watch
The cast and crew of “American Animals” stopped by the IndieWire Studio Presented by Dropbox earlier today, with director Bart Layton explaining what compelled him to dramatize a real-life heist that went horribly wrong in his new Sundance caper. Watch below.

Read More:‘American Animals’ Review: A True Heist Story About Four Idiot Kids Who Fowled Up — Sundance 2018

“I’d read about the story of this crime, and everything about it seemed quite unusual — not least the fact that it was perpetrated by a group of seemingly well-educated young men from pretty good backgrounds,” Layton says. “I initially thought it sounded like a good yarn, and the more I read about it, the more it seemed, like all capers, it was well planned but it didn’t quite go according to plan.”

Those young men actually appear in the film at one point, something that stars Evan Peters and Barry Keoghan both found necessary.
See full article at Indiewire »

Carey Mulligan: If Dee Rees Was a White Man, She’d Be Directing the Next ‘Star Wars’

Carey Mulligan: If Dee Rees Was a White Man, She’d Be Directing the Next ‘Star Wars’
Actress Carey Mulligan called out the “Star Wars” franchise’s lack of female directors as well as their lack of representation at award shows while at the Sundance Film Festival.

“If Dee Rees was a white man she’d be directing the next ‘Star Wars,’ she’d be nominated for an Oscar without question,” Mulligan said at Variety’s Sundance studio, just prior to Tuesday’s Academy Award nominations.

Many thought that Rees, who directed the critically-acclaimed “Mudbound,” was snubbed from this year’s Golden Globes race for Best Director along with “Lady Bird’s” Greta Gerwig and “Wonder Woman’s” Patty Jenkins.

“There’s something not right, and we’re working on it,” she added. “I think Greta [Gerwig] and Patty Jenkins have been overlooked for too long. If it doesn’t happen I fell like it will send out a big signal and I think that people will react to that.”

On the “Star
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'American Animals', Blindspotting' among early Sundance buzz

'American Animals', Blindspotting' among early Sundance buzz
Saturday premieres bring Colette, Leave No Trace, Yardie, among others.

While the industry awaits the first big on-site deal in Sundance, where the much-fancied American Animals is expected to close soon, buzz is starting to emerge on several other titles heading into the first weekend.

Juliet, Naked, Blindspotting, Monsters And Men, and The Catcher Was A Spy were all in play on Saturday ahead of a cluster of anticipated premieres that includes Colette, Leave No Trace, Sorry To Bother You, Yardie, and Wildlife.

UTA Independent Film Group represents Us rights to American Animals, Bart Layton’s Us Dramatic Competition entry that impressed in its Friday night premiere and features Barry Keoghan (The Killing Of A Sacred Deer) in the tale of four youngsters who attempt an art heist. Sierra/Affinity handles international sales on Layton’s dramatic debut and first feature since the acclaimed Sundance 2012 documentary The Imposter.

Jesse Peretz’s Nick Hornby adaptation Juliet, Naked, a three-header
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'American Animals', Blindspotting' among early Sundance buzz (update)

Saturday premieres bring Sorry To Bother You, Colette, Leave No Trace, Yardie, among others.

While the industry awaits the first big on-site deal in Sundance, where the much-fancied American Animals is expected to close soon, buzz is starting to emerge on several other titles over the first weekend.

Boots Riley’s outrageous satire Sorry To Bother You drew multiple key buyers to Saturday evening’s world premiere at The Library, with Amazon Studios, Focus Features, Neon, Aviron, Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions, and Samuel Goldwyn Films among those in attendance. Endeavor Content represents worldwide rights.

Across town Wash Westmoreland’s Colette starring Keira Knightley was receiving its premiere in the Eccles and has been high on buyers’ must-see lists. The Premieres selection from Number 9 Films, Killer Films and Bold Films stars Knightley as the titular French author. Westmoreland directs and shares a writing credit with his late husband and collaborator Richard Glatzer (who died in 2015) and Rebecca Lemkowicz. [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sundance 2018 Deals: The Complete List of Festival Purchases So Far

Sundance 2018 Deals: The Complete List of Festival Purchases So Far
The 10-day-long Sundance Film Festival — the first major fest on every cinephile’s calendar — begins this afternoon in the Utah mountains. Last year’s slate produced current Oscar hopefuls “Call Me by Your Name,” “Get Out,” “Mudbound,” and “The Big Sick,” the latter being two of the biggest buys witnessed at the festival, garnering a respective $12.5 million from Netflix and $12 million from Amazon Studios.

Distributors are descending on Park City, Salt Lake City, and Sundance in search of their successors, hoping not to repeat last year’s blunder by Fox Searchlight, which paid $9.5 million for “Patti Cake$,” a film that reaped only $800,000 domestically.

Here’s our constantly-updated compendium of every 2018 Sundance acquisition.

Read More:Top 20 Acquisition Titles of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival Star Keira Knightley, Ethan Hawke, and More

Title: “Seeing Allred”

Buyer: Netflix

Section: U.S. Documentary Competition“I feel fortunate that ‘Seeing Allred’ captures my passion and battle for
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire Announces Our First-Ever IndieWire Studio at Sundance

IndieWire is proud to announce the inaugural IndieWire Studio at Sundance, presented by Dropbox, on Park City’s Main Street. With daily video interviews at its exclusive studio, it will serve as a destination for scores of actors, directors, producers, screenwriters, composers and documentary subjects.

From from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, January 19 through Monday, January 22, IndieWire will sit down with approximately 100 entertainment luminaries at 625 Main Street. Among those scheduled are Aubrey Plaza (“An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn”),Chloë Grace Moretz (“The Miseducation Of Cameron Post”), Chloë Sevigny (“Lizzie”), Chris O’Dowd and Rose Byrne (“Juliet, Naked”), Daveed Diggs (“Blindspotting”), Elle Fanning, Peter Dinklage, and Reed Morano (“I Think We’re Alone Now”), Ethan Hawke (“Blaze” and “Juliet, Naked”), Idris Elba (“Yardie”), Gus Van Sant (“Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot”), Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Kindergarten Teacher”), Joan Jett (“Bad Reputation”), Keira Knightley (“Colette
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance: How Will Festival Tackle #MeToo, Political Turmoil, and More?

June Pictures CEO Alex Saks was having an amazing 2017. Her first three productions sold to Focus, Netflix and eOne after their Park City premieres; A24 picked up her Oscar contender “The Florida Project” in Cannes; and her latest sales title, “Wildlife,” was selected for the U.S. Dramatic Competition at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

But just a month ago, after sexual misconduct allegations surfaced against chairman Andrew Duncan, Saks took sole operating control of June and arrived at terms to buy out his stake.

“Unfortunately, when allegations like that exist, the place that we built is no longer a home,” Saks says. “It’s tarnished, so [taking over] felt like the necessary thing to do to protect these amazing pieces of work.” Though Duncan denied the accusations in a Dec. 15 statement, Saks says he “has very graciously chosen to take [his producer credit] off ‘Wildlife’ to give us the best opportunity for success” in Park City.

Following 2016 protests
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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